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Author Topic: MPPT Solar Charge Controller, best for RFI ?  (Read 16147 times)
N6YFM
Member

Posts: 516




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« on: August 21, 2016, 07:01:05 PM »

I am planning to build a semi-portable (field day style, not hiking) Solar kit
for field operation.   I would like to use between 2 and 4 100watt panels from
Amazon.com, likely Renogy unless you have better ideas.

I was wondering if anyone has experience with recent model/brand MPPT charge
controllers, and which ones have less RFI for the HF ham bands?
I would like purchase a 30 or 40 Amp MPPT controller, so I have flexibility to
use between 2 and 4 panels.

Anyone have personal experience with good MPPT controller, low RFI/noise?

Thanks in advance for any advice/education.

Neal
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W7ASA
Member

Posts: 473




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« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2016, 07:17:00 AM »

So far, I've been pleased with Morning Star charge controllers. It's what I used while a live-aboard sailor and use a similar model now on my ham shack. They have a jumper that can be set for a less efficient but even lower RFI mode if you happen to need it, shock I never have.

73 and please let us know your progress.

Ray
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AFA6MD
Member

Posts: 31




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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2016, 11:06:33 PM »

Have great experience with a Genasun controller. Made in USA, but don't think they have a 40Amp model, but 4 10Amp models may work for you?
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AC7CW
Member

Posts: 1002




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« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2016, 04:42:15 PM »

On the off chance you don't need the efficiency of a smps you could build an analog one and have no noise much at all to worry about
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Novice 1958, 20WPM Extra now... (and get off my lawn)
W4KYR
Member

Posts: 1598




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« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2016, 11:06:12 PM »

I am planning to build a semi-portable (field day style, not hiking) Solar kit
for field operation.   I would like to use between 2 and 4 100watt panels from
Amazon.com, likely Renogy unless you have better ideas.

I was wondering if anyone has experience with recent model/brand MPPT charge
controllers, and which ones have less RFI for the HF ham bands?
I would like purchase a 30 or 40 Amp MPPT controller, so I have flexibility to
use between 2 and 4 panels.

Anyone have personal experience with good MPPT controller, low RFI/noise?

Thanks in advance for any advice/education.

Neal

I just saw a video by "Commsprepper" on YouTube about grounding an MPPT controller.  He uses both VHF and HF in the shack .  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AT1VBZUjHqA

He might have other videos on the subject. This is his main channel.

https://www.youtube.com/user/Commsprepper/videos


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The internet and cellphone networks are great until they go down, what then? Find out here. 
https://www.eham.net/ehamforum/smf/index.php/topic,111948.0.html

Using Windows 98 For Packet...
AA4HA
Member

Posts: 2384




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« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2016, 02:04:33 PM »

If you want a totally noise-free charge controller you would go with a linear regulator based upon a component like the LM358 device.

The charge controllers that are out there today are based upon MPPT and PWM schemes that do generate RFI. To get totally quiet you need to take a few steps back to what we had in the early 1980's.

Here is a good schematic. You will end up spending less than $20 in parts.

http://microcontrollerslab.com/15-ampere-solar-charge-controller-without-microcontroller/
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
Free space loss (dB) = 32.4 + 20 × log10d + 20 × log10 f
KK5JY
Member

Posts: 81




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« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2016, 04:17:21 PM »

If you read up on MorningStar, you will see that they were specifically designed to work in close proximity to receivers, at places like tower sites.  I have used a couple of different models, and never seen any RFI issues related to the charge controller, even with an HF antenna directly overhead.

Inverters, on the other hand, are an entirely different matter...
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K7AAT
Member

Posts: 21




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« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2016, 08:36:19 PM »


With little doubt,  the best MPPT solar charge controller for absolute minimal RFI can be found at  DIYSOLARFORU.COM.   We installed this controller in our club's new comm trailer and measure near zero RFI compared to massive RFI from other MPPT controllers we tried.  Several members have changed over to this unit for our personal solar systems, too.
www.diysolarforu.com

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N6YFM
Member

Posts: 516




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« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2016, 12:53:35 PM »


With little doubt,  the best MPPT solar charge controller for absolute minimal RFI can be found at  DIYSOLARFORU.COM.   We installed this controller in our club's new comm trailer and measure near zero RFI compared to massive RFI from other MPPT controllers we tried.  Several members have changed over to this unit for our personal solar systems, too.
www.diysolarforu.com



So this product can handle 1 or 2 panels at most, depending on panel size.
What do you do if you want 3 or 4 panels?   Are they building a larger 25 or 30 Amp model?

Or are there easy methods to combine the outputs, or do they end up fighting each other on
charge details?

Thanks,

Neal
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N6YFM
Member

Posts: 516




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« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2017, 03:43:12 PM »

So far, I've been pleased with Morning Star charge controllers.

I noticed that MorningStar MMPT 30A controllers start at close to $400 (USD).  OUCH!  :-)

Has anyone tested or tried the Tracer 4215BN series sold on Amazon and Ebay
under various labels like EP Power, EP Solar, EPeaver, and, of course, Tracer.
These are approx half that cost, and for building a two panel (2 x 100watt) system,
it seems easier to justify $200 instead of $400 for the charger, *IF* this unit
is not already known to be a terrible noisy RF hash generator?  Any experiences?

If no one knows, I may just try one under the 30-day Amazon return policy?

Neal
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KD8SKM
Member

Posts: 9




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« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2017, 01:27:42 PM »

Neal:

We are working on higher power controllers - now offer 12 and 24 volts in same unit and at 24 volts it does 460 watts real output.  16 amps per unit is about the practical limit for the physical size.

The problem is as you increase current the heat is a squared function... you can only dissipate so much in a 4x6x1.5 inch metal box before it gets too hot to be useful... we keep losses under 4 watts total out of 200 watts output for power losses.

I^R losses are the culprit here....

To answer your previous question - yes they can be parallel connected to increase current and there is no limit on how many.  We have 12 of them at our off grid cabin that combined deliver over 185 amps into the batteries.

So check us out at www.diysolarforu.com

Cheers,

Rob
KD8SKM
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