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Author Topic: Do all radios need an external power supply  (Read 10271 times)
W5RBB
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Posts: 35




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« on: February 18, 2017, 03:04:36 PM »

Thinking of upgrading to a new radio. Yaesu ftdx3000 or ICOM 7600 and was trying to figure out i have to get an external power supply like I did with my ICOM 7000. Or do these come with a plug to go into an outlet?
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SOFAR
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« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2017, 03:08:25 PM »

I usually skim through the user manual, before any radio purchase. Gives me insight into all the features. Most manuals are available online.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2017, 04:47:00 PM »

Personally, I wouldn't want a radio with an internal AC power supply. First, it makes operation from a battery or vehicle in an emergency difficult. Second, if the internal power supply fails, you will be in for a pretty expensive repair (if you can even purchase a replacement internal supply). External 13.8VDC supplies are fairly inexpensive and can be used to power accessories as well as the radio.
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Bob  AA4PB
Garrisonville, VA
W8JX
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« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2017, 07:32:32 PM »

Personally, I wouldn't want a radio with an internal AC power supply. First, it makes operation from a battery or vehicle in an emergency difficult. Second, if the internal power supply fails, you will be in for a pretty expensive repair (if you can even purchase a replacement internal supply). External 13.8VDC supplies are fairly inexpensive and can be used to power accessories as well as the radio.

I would not have a expensive base station rig without a built in power supply. Not being able to run on 12 volts is not aa big a problem as you suggest. Better rigs also use more than 13.8 volts for finals anyway. I used to use my 830 portable when traveling many years ago and it was kinda a all in one box, All I needed was 120 volts and a resonanbly resonant antenna as the 830 could handle 3 to 1 one or a bit more SWR without fuss and it was a lot easier lugging it than a rig, antenna tuner and a power supply back then.
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Ham since 1969....  Old School 20wpm REAL Extra Class..
GM1FLQ
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Posts: 794




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« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2017, 03:02:13 AM »

Like a lot of things some radios have good built in power supplies and others don't.

I had 2 x Icom R7000 receivers that in standard form are mains powered, they ran excessively hot when using this source, so much so that I reckoned on premature failure of components - I used the molex on the back panel to supply 13.8V from an external supply for a nice cooler solution.

Did the same with my Icom R7100 as it ran way too hot also when powered via its own internal supply.
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W8JX
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« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2017, 05:21:42 AM »

Like a lot of things some radios have good built in power supplies and others don't.

I had 2 x Icom R7000 receivers that in standard form are mains powered, they ran excessively hot when using this source, so much so that I reckoned on premature failure of components - I used the molex on the back panel to supply 13.8V from an external supply for a nice cooler solution.

Did the same with my Icom R7100 as it ran way too hot also when powered via its own internal supply.

Must have linear supplies in them. Switchers run much cooler.
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Ham since 1969....  Old School 20wpm REAL Extra Class..
WD0BMS
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« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2017, 07:12:33 AM »

Both the FTDX 3000 and the IC 7600 require external power supplies.
The FTDX 5000 MPL, TS 990S, and IC 7700 are a few current transceivers that have power supplies built in.
73,
Dave WD0BMS
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W5RBB
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« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2017, 09:18:32 AM »

Good things to know when considering a purchase. Really been eyeing the FTDX 3000. It has some great rebates right now.
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WB2EOD
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« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2017, 07:09:50 PM »

Only the "top of the line" 200 watt radios have built in power supplies. 
Just about all the "standard" 100 watt rigs require an external power supply.
A 100 watt transceiver will draw as much as 23 amps key down at full power.   The exception to this is the Kenwood TS-480HX which can run 200 watts.  For this, you will need 2 power supplies or one that can do 40-45 amps
Linear or switching, the choice is yours.  Good names are Astron, Samlex, Powerwerx, Alinco.
Hope this helps
73
WB2EOD
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AF5CC
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« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2017, 05:14:53 PM »

Some of the older 100 watt radios had an internal PS as an option, so if you find one on the used market, it may or may not have an internal PS.  These include the Icom 740, 745, 751, and 751A, and the Yaesu FT990 and FT650.  You could get a Yaesu FT1000MP without an internal ps, but those are pretty rare.  Every FT1000MP I have seen has the internal PS installed.

Other 100 watt solid state rigs that came with an internal PS include:

Icom 761 and 765
Yaesu FT1000MP MK5 field, FT980, FT767, FT One, FT2000
Kenwood TS930, TS 940

Greater than 100 watt rigs with internal power supplies include:

Icom 775, 781, 7800, 7700, 7850, 7851
Yaesu FT1000D, FTDX5000, FTDX9000D, FTDX9000Contest
Kenwood TS950S, TS950SDX, TS990
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W8JX
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« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2017, 06:37:01 AM »

 The exception to this is the Kenwood TS-480HX which can run 200 watts.  For this, you will need 2 power supplies or one that can do 40-45 amps

This is not correct. Many take the worst case scenario rating that are in theory at 13.8 plus 15% or when powered with 15.9 volts. At 13.8 is is much less. Also one power jack feed a final section and raido's logic/receiver circuit anf the other strictly that second set of finals so it is not power draw x 2. I do not own a HX but I own a 480 SAT and it draws about 18.5 amps on 13.8 volts at 100 watts out. When you consider radios logic and its regulator takes about 2.5 amps to power that means second feed will need about 15.5 amps so 18.5 + 16 is approx 34.5 amps which means a 35 amp supply will  power it. Also remember that a 35 amp supply does not stop at 35 amps but typically is start to fold back at 10 to 15% or more over that. Many merely quote specs with little understanding of what they mean or first hand experience as they are not nominal real world ratings but worst case at a over voltage 15.9 volts. If they put current draw at 13.8 volts in spec someone would complain if it was higher when supply voltage was higher. 

BTW, the 480HX is the only rig I am aware of they is rated for more than 100 watts out and still using 13.8 volts. That being said, the ability to run on a external supply is not as big a asset as some think because it limits power out and type of output devices used. With a internal power supply, higher supply voltages are possible and there are more options for output devices. Also, not having a built in power supply also lower cost of designing and building rig.
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Ham since 1969....  Old School 20wpm REAL Extra Class..
VE3TMT
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Posts: 878




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« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2017, 08:21:09 AM »

Thinking of upgrading to a new radio. Yaesu ftdx3000 or ICOM 7600 and was trying to figure out i have to get an external power supply like I did with my ICOM 7000. Or do these come with a plug to go into an outlet?


A very quick Google search would have provided you the answers you seek.

http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/hamhf/3000spec.html

http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/hamhf/0076spec.html
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KQ4YA
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« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2017, 05:45:41 AM »

One of my first radios when I came back to ham radio after a long absence was a Kenwood TS-830S. It had a built-in power supply. Despite being bulky and heavy compared to today's transceivers, it was still handy to take along on a trip. And since it was a hybrid with a tube type transmitter it matched loads pretty well with no need for an antenna tuner. It was great to be able to just grab the carrying handle and go - nothing else needed other than an antenna.

I still have a radio with a built-in power supply - the FTDX5000MP. But I have to admit it wouldn't be handy to take that sucker along, way too big, way too heavy.

But every time I'm at a hamfest and see a TS-830S I'm tempted to buy it (to my wife's great delight I've so far resisted).
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W8JX
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« Reply #13 on: March 13, 2017, 11:21:32 AM »

One of my first radios when I came back to ham radio after a long absence was a Kenwood TS-830S. It had a built-in power supply. Despite being bulky and heavy compared to today's transceivers, it was still handy to take along on a trip. And since it was a hybrid with a tube type transmitter it matched loads pretty well with no need for an antenna tuner. It was great to be able to just grab the carrying handle and go - nothing else needed other than an antenna.

I used my 830 same way a several times many years ago. Like poster said all you needed was a antenna and a 115vac and you were ready to roll. My 830 even made a few cross country trips for portable use.
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Ham since 1969....  Old School 20wpm REAL Extra Class..
KC8Y
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Posts: 476




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« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2017, 06:32:18 AM »

Had an icom 736 HF xcvr with a built-in 120v power supply. It ran great Smiley
Never any problems.

Ken KC8Y
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