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Author Topic: Any strange propagation during the solar eclipse?  (Read 4705 times)
WA2ISE
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Posts: 1057




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« on: August 21, 2017, 12:16:20 PM »

Not near my rigs.  Anyone notice any unusual propagation during the eclipse?
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K0UA
Member

Posts: 1464




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« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2017, 12:37:15 PM »

YES.   weird QSB on 20, and 160 and 80 opened up like evening, I saw contacts out to about 800 miles.
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AC8SW
Member

Posts: 50




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« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2017, 02:05:15 PM »

Yes, my 40m JT65 reception was running 6-8 decodes per minute during our local eclipse peak, now down to 2-3 per minute three hours after the event.  Normal early afternoon count is zero.
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AC8SW
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Posts: 50




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« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2017, 02:46:54 PM »

Follow-up.  Made 8 40m JT65 QSOs during the early afternoon eclipse today, all 300 - 600 miles. My experience is that the 40m JT65 frequency decodes no traffic until about 2 hours before sundown.
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WB8VLC
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Posts: 427




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« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2017, 03:10:29 PM »

Here in Salem Oregon I had multiple stations on 40 and 6 meters, one 40 cw and two 6meter, one on 6 cw and the second on 6 FT8.

During and an hour after our 100% eclipse period,  40 meters cw was very busy with stations east out to 900 miles heard, most days there is no cw activity on 40 until sunset.

On 6 meters a sole cw station from near Boulder Colorado was coming in 59A with Aurora sounding cq's while my 6 element was pointed at ~110 degrees along the eclipse route at 1820utc.

There were no FT8 decodes for me on 6 only the single aurora sounding cw station.

The 40 meter cw stations were readable until 1825 utc  and the 6meter cw station was heard at 1822 utc.

The sun finally reappeared for us from 100% eclipse around ~1720 utc so signals were still in on 40 and 6 cw up to an hour later.
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K0UA
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Posts: 1464




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« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2017, 12:24:41 PM »

What I found the most stunning were the 160 meter stations in 4 land easily copied here in Southwestern Mo.   I normally don't hear anything on 160 in midday here.
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W8JX
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Posts: 12094




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« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2017, 01:54:36 PM »

What I found the most stunning were the 160 meter stations in 4 land easily copied here in Southwestern Mo.   I normally don't hear anything on 160 in midday here.

It actually makes complete sense. D layer is responsible for daytime absorption on 160 and 80 (and to some extent on 40m too)  and it quickly dissipates when sun sets or suns is blocked.   
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--------------------------------------
Ham since 1969....  Old School 20wpm REAL Extra Class..
K0UA
Member

Posts: 1464




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« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2017, 05:13:50 PM »

What I found the most stunning were the 160 meter stations in 4 land easily copied here in Southwestern Mo.   I normally don't hear anything on 160 in midday here.

It actually makes complete sense. D layer is responsible for daytime absorption on 160 and 80 (and to some extent on 40m too)  and it quickly dissipates when sun sets or suns is blocked.   

Agreed..I had never seen that before, but I have never operated in an eclipse before either.   Smiley
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KB8GAE
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Posts: 227




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« Reply #8 on: August 27, 2017, 05:50:38 AM »

I had a lot of fun working cw on 160 thru 10 meters during the SEQP, running 100 watts to an OCF dipole inverted vee at 30 feet from grid EN91OA in NE Ohio.

The eclipse at my QTH started at 1709z, peaked (80%) at 1833z, and ended at 1953z.  Sunset was at 0008z.

I sent a series of CQ’s at least once every hour on each band.

After the party I downloaded the raw data from the reverse beacon network and looked at my spots.
 
From 1400z to 2000z I was spotted on 80 meters by North American nodes between 36 and 470 miles from me. 

From 20:00 to 22:00 I was not spotted on 80 meters by any North American nodes.  I was spotted by HB9JCB at 2022z with a snr of 20db and distance of 4,192 miles from me, and by DO4DXA at 2128z with a snr of  21db and distance of 4281 miles from me.  These were 2 ½ to 3 ½ hours before sunset.

Both VOCAP and W6EL prop show zero probability of propagation to Europe at this time of day on 80 meters. 

I sent CQ’s on 80 meters Saturday and between 2000z and 2200z and was spotted on the RBN in North America but not Europe.

I would be interested if  anyone else observed 80 meters going long during the SEQP.

73's Rich KB8GAE
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KA1R
Member

Posts: 1




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« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2017, 07:08:32 PM »

Rich, I think that, unfortunately, your spots from HB9JCB and DO4DXA
didn't happen: they're the result of a software bug affecting your use
of the raw data. The current
http://reversebeacon.net/raw_data/dl.php?f=20170821 download contains:

  (these three lines around 20:22 were adjacent)
  HB9JCB,HB,EU,3520,80m,UR3ABI,UR,EU,CQ,7,2017-08-21 20:22:31,20,CW
  W8WTS,K,NA,7025,40m,W9S,K,NA,CQ,15,2017-08-21 20:22:32,23,CW
  W8WTS,K,NA,3527,80m,KB8GAE,K,NA,CQ,14,2017-08-21 20:22:32,20,CW

  (these three lines around 21:28 were adjacent)
  DO4DXA,DL,EU,3562,80m,DL6ZB,DL,EU,CQ,20,2017-08-21 21:28:49,21,CW
  DO4DXA,DL,EU,18074.8,17m,SM7GVF,SM,EU,CQ,6,2017-08-21 21:28:49,27,CW
  K4KDJ,K,NA,3527,80m,KB8GAE,K,NA,CQ,16,2017-08-21 21:28:49,20,CW

In other words, maybe the software bug is causing the spotted station
to be found two lines AFTER the spotting station. HB9JCB indeed has a
"20" entry at 20:22 on 80m, but the spotted station was UR3ABI, not
you. Similarly, DO4DXA has a "21" entry at 21:28 on 80m, but the
spotted station was DL6ZB, not you. (The other issue here is that 20
and 21 are CW speeds, not dB values.)

In any case, the raw data clearly shows only four spots for KB8GAE on
80m after 20:00 UTC: by K4KDJ, W8WTS, K2MFF-2, and K4KDJ (again).

(I've also been looking at the RBN raw data for the
http://wu1itu.club/2017-08-21-eclipse-40m-asia report, and I think the
eclipse contributed to DXing on 40 meters but not 80.)
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KB8GAE
Member

Posts: 227




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« Reply #10 on: August 30, 2017, 06:32:33 AM »

Matt,

I agree with your analysis.  I was not spotted on 80 meters by HB9JCB or DO4DXA. 

I don’t think it is a bug in the RBN data as upon review it appears my spreadsheet file got corrupted.

My data shows both a speed and a db column.

Thanks for correcting my error.

73's Rich KB8GAE
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WA2ONH
Member

Posts: 404




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« Reply #11 on: September 04, 2017, 05:47:36 AM »

As noted at The SWLing Post site on Sept 4th...

https://swling.com/blog/2017/09/guest-post-eclipse-2017-shortwave-propagation-observations/
Guest Post: Eclipse 2017 – Shortwave Propagation Observations
by Bob LaRose (W6ACU)


"DXers know that the reception of overseas Shortwave Broadcast stations offers one of the best ways to immediately gauge shortwave radio propagation conditions from your location to distant areas of the world. For the eclipse of 2017 I decided to see how reception of SW broadcast stations on lower shortwave  broadcast frequencies (and to a smaller extent medium wave AM) reacted to the short term effects of the eclipse.

(Article continues at the above LINK)" 
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73 de WA2ONH   ... Charlie
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"There is no shame in not knowing; The shame lies in not finding out"
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