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Author Topic: E vs Es Propagation  (Read 3842 times)
AC8SW
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Posts: 50




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« on: August 27, 2017, 07:22:58 PM »

I'm an old (72) new ham, just in my 3rd year of HF work.  I'm getting into 6m ops in order to work Sporadic E (Es) digital modes, especially FT8.  I've seen DX logs that categorize contacts as either "Tropo" or "Es".  Question, please: How do you distinguish between Es and normal E-layer propagation? Thanks.
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K0UA
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« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2017, 07:57:30 PM »

I'm an old (72) new ham, just in my 3rd year of HF work.  I'm getting into 6m ops in order to work Sporadic E (Es) digital modes, especially FT8.  I've seen DX logs that categorize contacts as either "Tropo" or "Es".  Question, please: How do you distinguish between Es and normal E-layer propagation? Thanks.

I always thought the subscript s in the term Es was just a shorthand way of saying Sporadic E layer propagation.  I didn't think there was any other kind of E layer except the Sporadic one.  Tropospheric bending is down in the atmosphere not the Ionosphere.   At least that was what I thought.  I could be wrong.
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KM4DYX
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« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2017, 03:43:06 AM »

"Regular" E layer propagation can occur anytime during the day at lower frequencies. Short skip, or NVIS, propagation on 80 meters has been possible for most of the contiguous US as of late, at least for some part of the day.

"Sporadic" E is a random event whereupon an unusual "cloud" of heavily ionized gas forms and allows unusual propagation, such as 50 MHZ DX.

chart of e layer critical freq that determines short skip opening:

http://spacew.com/www/foe.html

73,
Al
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AC8SW
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« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2017, 07:21:35 AM »

Thank you, all.  I'm new to this, so all feedback is appreciated.
73
AC8SW
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G8YMW
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« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2017, 08:54:06 AM »

There are several E layer modes.
Sporadic E which is not solar
Auroral E which is solar. Hard to tell from sporadic E is Tone 9
Aurora with its distinctive distortion.
Trans Equitorial Propagation (I think that is E layer)
Meteor Scatter from the ionised trails of meteors as they burn up
The last mode is another suited to some data modes
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73 de Tony
Windows 10:  Making me profane since March 2017
W4KYR
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« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2017, 07:35:18 AM »

Over the years I have observed these Sporadic E-Skip characteristics

1. Rapid fading to full local strength in seconds.

2. Depending on the frequency, mileage can vary. On the FM broadcast band, sporadic E-Skip can average 800 to 1,200 miles +/-. On six meters this can be from 500 to 1,000 miles +/-. On 10 meters the range can be even be lower from 350 miles to 1,000 miles. My record for short skip was about 300 miles from Pittsburgh PA to Northern NJ some 25 years ago.

3. Sporadic E-Skip generally has a season that runs from May until early August, and again from December through January. (Although it can happen anytime)

4 . Time for sporadic E-Skip seems to be 8 to 10 AM and again from 11 AM to 1 PM and with a bigger peak in the afternoon from 4 PM till 8 PM or longer depending on the band. (All day openings are certainly possible)

5. Multi-hop Sporadic E-Skip is not only possible but can be common on 6 meters and below with openings across the 'pond' or to the West Coast from the East Coast. Multi-hop sporadic e-skip on the FM broadcast band is pretty rare but it has happened with FM broadcast stations from the U.S. and Canadian east coast being picked up in Europe.

6. While the MUF can go into the FM broadcast band , 88 - 108 mhz. It can go much higher into the two meter band and even on occasion reach the 220 Mhz band.

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AA2UK
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« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2017, 03:51:09 PM »

Another observation, when E's skip gets short on 6 meters <300-325 miles watch 2 meters for E's. This is an indicator the MUF is rising. MUF being the maximum usable frequency. I have worked E skip on 2 meters almost yearly but it's rare.
I have worked a dozen or so 222mHz E openings over the last 20 years, that's very rare.
Bill, AA2UK
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