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   Home   Help Search  
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Author Topic: The future of HF?  (Read 11557 times)
K0UA
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Posts: 1448




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« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2017, 06:12:31 AM »

Or, you can go to FT8 and work DX all day any day on 15 and sometimes on  10 meters. Even when the band is "dead"  Of course any of the lower bands are full of DX digital signals. 
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AC7CW
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Posts: 1002




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« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2017, 09:49:41 AM »

Or, you can go to FT8 and work DX all day any day on 15 and sometimes on  10 meters. Even when the band is "dead"  Of course any of the lower bands are full of DX digital signals. 

FT8 is very encouraging. What was the motivation to build a station when you couldn't work anybody? Getting ready for the sunspots a few years down the line, what? Now 10 watts will work the world at the bottom of the sunspot cycle. It's a new era of Amateur Radio.
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Novice 1958, 20WPM Extra now... (and get off my lawn)
OZ8AGB
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Posts: 345




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« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2017, 03:52:41 AM »

End of sun spot cycle is not the end of HF.
At the bottom of the last cycle I worked my very first VK station on 20m SSB with a wire loop antenna. Only got a 55 report but a complete QSO.
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K0UA
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Posts: 1448




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« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2017, 09:05:14 AM »

End of sun spot cycle is not the end of HF.
At the bottom of the last cycle I worked my very first VK station on 20m SSB with a wire loop antenna. Only got a 55 report but a complete QSO.

Agreed, all is not doom and gloom,  Just go lower in frequency.  The lower HF bands usually work fine in low sunspot activity time.  I will be improving my 160 meters antenna as soon as the ticks and chiggers are put to bed.
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AA2UK
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Posts: 363




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« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2017, 03:48:51 PM »

All is not lost or bad last night and the night before 6 meters was open to South America using a mode called TEP.
Don't make it about climate change cause there is no historical data to support your theory.
Yes if we are at the true bottom the true top is in 5.5 years plus or minus.
73, Bill AA2UK
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RENTON481
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Posts: 188




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« Reply #20 on: November 27, 2017, 09:18:16 PM »

SWBC may die out in most of the world before the sunspots come back. There will be holdouts broadcasting to Asia and Africa.

Medium wave will be in existence a bit longer than that. The US and Canada have plenty of MW stations, as does Asia.

The internet is great for radio except for geo-blocking, which seems to be increasing incrementally.

I hate to say it but the future looks dimmer and dimmer for international broadcasting of any type.

I hope I'm wrong.
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ONAIR
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Posts: 3535




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« Reply #21 on: November 29, 2017, 01:30:14 AM »

SWBC may die out in most of the world before the sunspots come back. There will be holdouts broadcasting to Asia and Africa.

Medium wave will be in existence a bit longer than that. The US and Canada have plenty of MW stations, as does Asia.

The internet is great for radio except for geo-blocking, which seems to be increasing incrementally.

I hate to say it but the future looks dimmer and dimmer for international broadcasting of any type.

I hope I'm wrong.
    Good point, but the real question is whether or not those abandoned frequencies will ever be given to hams?
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VK5EEE
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Posts: 1160




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« Reply #22 on: November 29, 2017, 02:45:15 AM »

FT8 is very encouraging. What was the motivation to build a station when you couldn't work anybody? Getting ready for the sunspots a few years down the line, what? Now 10 watts will work the world at the bottom of the sunspot cycle. It's a new era of Amateur Radio.
So you can with 3W of CW: on 30m Long Path I had QSO to Europe from VK with 3W, and to USA, Japan, DU...

Good point, but the real question is whether or not those abandoned frequencies will ever be given to hams?

They already have been! In Indonesia you can buy a radio without a license and use it freely on any frequency on HF, generally without problems.
Back in the day a hundred years ago or so, ALL of HF above I think it was 3MHz, was given to any experimenter who cared, without any license. Only after those in Europe and America started using HF and made contact with each other, did the 'authorities' realise that HF was valuable, and took most of it away.
Now, there are plenty of hams, but FEW are active on air, as they spend more time on the Internet, under control of XYL, watching Tell-lie-Vision, or whatever.
So it's not like hams NEED more bands, but, those in Indonesia, for example, have simply helped themselves. They may not call themselves hams, and they may not experiment, I don't know, but they operate freely on ANY frequency without license and can be heard every day and evening across the lower half of HF.
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever

Support CW and join CW clubs. QTT: FIST#1124, HSC#1437, UFT#728, RCWC#982, SKCC#15007, CWOPS#1714, 30CW#1,
RENTON481
Member

Posts: 188




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« Reply #23 on: November 29, 2017, 02:35:05 PM »


Good point, but the real question is whether or not those abandoned frequencies will ever be given to hams?

They already have been! In Indonesia you can buy a radio without a license and use it freely on any frequency on HF, generally without problems.
Back in the day a hundred years ago or so, ALL of HF above I think it was 3MHz, was given to any experimenter who cared, without any license. Only after those in Europe and America started using HF and made contact with each other, did the 'authorities' realise that HF was valuable, and took most of it away.
Now, there are plenty of hams, but FEW are active on air, as they spend more time on the Internet, under control of XYL, watching Tell-lie-Vision, or whatever.
So it's not like hams NEED more bands, but, those in Indonesia, for example, have simply helped themselves. They may not call themselves hams, and they may not experiment, I don't know, but they operate freely on ANY frequency without license and can be heard every day and evening across the lower half of HF.

The Indonesian ham pirates you refer to, I'm guessing they must be the ones that sometimes run a net just below 7000 kHz, sometimes ranging between 6995 and 7150 or so. A lot of them in Borneo / Kalimantan. I used to hear them a lot when conditions to the Pacific and Asia were good on 41 meters. Like a net of sorts. Sometimes with chanting and recording and playback. Some of it was very odd to hear.

But your point is well taken. I'm surprised more pirates don't use the SWBC bands now.
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