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Author Topic: Do all of the Internet radios carry SWL stations?  (Read 4115 times)
N1AUP
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Posts: 38




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« on: October 13, 2017, 06:29:18 PM »

Do all of the popular internet radios (Crane, Sangean, Ocean, etc) carry SWL stations like Radio Moscow, Havana, China, Netherlands, etc? 

Looking at the Amazon descriptions doesn't tell me much.

Thanks
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WW7KE
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Posts: 605




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« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2017, 07:18:49 PM »

Do all of the popular internet radios (Crane, Sangean, Ocean, etc) carry SWL stations like Radio Moscow, Havana, China, Netherlands, etc? 

Looking at the Amazon descriptions doesn't tell me much.

Thanks

A few things...

1.  "Popular internet radio" is an oxymoron.  There are a few out there, but most consumers, especially in the US, use TuneIn, or other specialized app, on their phone, PC, or tablet.  Check the listings there -- there are plenty of broadcasts from just about every country you can think of.

2.  Radio Moscow hasn't existed since the fall of the USSR in 1991.  Post-Soviet Russia had the Voice of Russia until it shut down a couple of years ago.  Radio Nederland, like most other "classic" international broadcasters, is gone as well.  Radio Australia still streams, as do VOA and the BBC, but the former also shut down its shortwave operations last year, and the latter two are just shadows of their former selves.

3.  The main SW broadcasters still running full schedules are American bible-bangers and brokered stations like WRMI Miami, and the remnants of the communist world -- Cuba, North Korea, China.  There are a few others, like Japan and South Korea, but the heydey of international shortwave broadcasting is long gone. 

Even the South American stations in the so-called "tropical" bands (120, 90, 60 meters), which used to fill the dial, are just about gone.  Those bands are occupied by US religious stations as well.
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He speaks fluent PSK31...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
KC2QYM
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Posts: 860




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« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2017, 10:23:53 AM »

Yes sir, your boatanchors are just about worth the scrap metal weight since the SW world is so diminished.  This is especially true if you only understand English.  So all you guys out there thinking you have a valuable collection of vintage radios should think again.  Nobody but radio fetishists want those grand old Nationals, Hallicrafters, Hammarlunds, etc. since the viable programming and stations are just history.  It's a shame but you need to realize what the truth is today in SWL.  I tried to sell my great condition Hallicrafters SX-110 (true, it's a mediocre but viable radio) over the last few years.  Started at $175, months later to $150, then $125....no takers.  Right now it sits in my living room as a great sounding AM broadcast band receiver and placed on top of a huge floor speaker which sounds great and glows in the dark.  Otherwise, no viable SWL appears to be out there.
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WW7KE
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Posts: 605




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« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2017, 04:44:45 PM »

There are still quite a few SW broadcasters, but you have to speak Chinese to understand them.  China uses shortwave for its regional stations, and many are audible in the US.

But trying to find English-language programming other than US-based religious and brokered stations, plus Radio New Zealand, the VOA, and the BBC (what's left of them)?  Fuggedaboudit!

And those old boat-anchors and later cheap solid-state radios aren't worth much in 2017, other than (in some cases) nice examples of industrial design, while others are just plain butt-ugly and they always were, even as new (**cough**National**cough**).  They're museum pieces, too insensitive and too unstable for today's Amateur Radio use.  Digital modes, and even CW these days, require rock-stable synthesized LOs, and those old tube rigs just don't have them.
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He speaks fluent PSK31...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
VA3VF
Member

Posts: 932




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« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2017, 05:00:13 PM »

Do all of the popular internet radios (Crane, Sangean, Ocean, etc) carry SWL stations like Radio Moscow, Havana, China, Netherlands, etc? 

Looking at the Amazon descriptions doesn't tell me much.

Thanks

It all depends on the station aggregator the manufacturer uses, but some radios allow the user to add stations, provided the full URL is known.

I don't follow it now, but when I purchased my internet radio, there were two big aggregators available.

Also note that since I purchased my radio, additional distribution formats have been introduced. Stations that were available back then, no longer work, because of the new system the station is using. This, I believe, is done so that the station can keep the listener on its own web page, and monetize it with ads.
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TECSUN660
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2017, 02:45:41 PM »

Via Amazon, I purchased an Ocean Digital WR60 internet/FM radio.  The sound quality is great.  Ocean Digital states there are about 17,000 radio stations available on this radio.  You can hear Radio Australia, New Zealand, Radio France, Ireland, various incarnations of the BBC, etc.  If your interest is classical music it's there, every US states' public radio station,  NPR news feed, JFK airport, New York city police, etc. China Radio International is not available, but other Chinese stations are, plus Hong Kong radio stations, including RTHK 3, the English service of Hong Kong TV radio. The menus goes by continent, county, music/news format, etc.  A WIFI connection is needed. Rock, country music, etc can be heard.  Ocean Digital uses mediau as it's internet aggregator. Below is a link for searching the list of stations by continent.  Some stations on this list are not available but many are.  Ocean Digital manufactures the C Crane internet radio. Don't worry the radio comes preloaded with lots of radio stations.

http://www.mediayou.net/web/search.php?lan=eng&loc_id=location
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N4UE
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Posts: 709




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« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2017, 03:56:55 PM »

Back decades ago when I started as an SWL, the SW bands were full. Today, it's a vast wasteland. Yes, the bible thumpers are there with megawatts.
Strange, that we as hams are 'concerned' about the loss of spectrum, when there is a LOT available. And more empty space almost daily.
Using a radio with a spectrum scope, tune across the 'old' SW bands.
It appears that this 'valuable' HF spectrum is unused.
Yes, I have a huge GC receiver collection. Pretty, but pretty useless. ha ha

ron
N4UE
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VA3VF
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Posts: 932




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« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2017, 04:08:57 PM »

Back decades ago when I started as an SWL, the SW bands were full. Today, it's a vast wasteland. Yes, the bible thumpers are there with megawatts.

ron
N4UE

I was of the same opinion, until I started using the UTwente SDR. I know, it's a remote, but I don't care about reception reports or QSLs these days. I want to listen to different programming. Shortwave listening in Europe is still worth spending some time on. I'm sure it has declined over the years, but it's not yet a wasteland like in NA.
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RENTON481
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Posts: 188




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« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2017, 12:04:27 PM »

Whether SWBC truly is a wasteland or not is a matter of opinion. Sure, most of the interesting stuff is in a foreign language, usually Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, or a different Eurasian or African language.

Some of the broadcasts still play some music.

So you learn a few words of other languages and learn to ID stations that way. It's still a form of DXing.

Hams have to acquire decoders for some modes, and it takes  a lot more time to learn to read and send CW efficiently than it takes to learn to ID a foreign language, where all you have to do is learn a couple words and vowel inflections.

Just another take on it.

But yeah, the bands are mostly empty. 31 and 25 meters used to be wall to wall from late in the afternoon to late in the morning, with a dip around noon when conditions weren't so hot. Now one is lucky if there are 8 or 9 stations on either of those bands, even when conditions are good. Everyone's points are well taken on that one.
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