Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Coax ends  (Read 4917 times)
KOP
Member

Posts: 245




Ignore
« on: November 02, 2017, 09:19:59 PM »

I've had so much trouble with pre-made coax connectors lately I was simply at a loss.
I finally turned to an old friend and he suggest I contact J.R. "Bob" Dobbs .

C/O P.O. Box 181417, Cleveland Hts, OH 44118-1417

For just $35 I was able to get the job done and the patch cables not only are solidly put together I can detect no losses whatsoever! In fact the entire batch may actually exhibit some gain!

I'm so happy I found someone who understands the plight of the amateur radio operator. Memorizing the entire extra class question pool never prepared me for failed patch cords and incompetent soldering.

If snail mail is beneath your modern ways "Bob" can also be reached through

stang@subgenius.com  or Phone/Fax: 216.320.9528 which I believe switches between phone and fax on alternate days.





Be the slack :-)
Logged

October 02, 2017, 07:53:41 PM
ON5MF
Member

Posts: 137


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2017, 11:39:42 PM »

In fact the entire batch may actually exhibit some gain!

 Shocked Roll Eyes Shocked Roll Eyes Shocked Roll Eyes
Logged

Mostly (low power) rtty contesting using OQ6A, sometimes dxing using ON5MF
in november '14,'15,'16,'17 and '18 also OP5MF, special prefix in commemoration of 100 years WW 1

www.on5mf.be
W0DLM
Member

Posts: 158




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2017, 07:07:48 AM »

I'm sure they're well put together patch cables, BUT... Yeah, sorry, you cannot get any "gain" from patch cables no matter how good they are!
Logged
SWMAN
Member

Posts: 1084




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2017, 12:30:22 PM »

 Unless they come from the magic cable patch.
Logged
DL8OV
Member

Posts: 769




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2017, 12:53:53 AM »

Guys, come on, we're radio amateurs. Is it THAT difficult to make up some patch cables with some scrap coax and a handful of plugs? Download a few YouTube videos, try it, learn from your mistakes then do it right.

With a factory produced antenna, purchased cables and a transceiver that came off the production line there's not much you can do when it comes to the training aspect of our hobby.

Peter DL8OV
Logged
N8AUC
Member

Posts: 317




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2017, 07:04:14 PM »

This is sad.

Coax patch cables should be something you make, not something you buy.

Putting a PL-259 on the end of a piece of coax correctly, isn't exactly rocket science.

And gain from a piece of cable? Sorry, that's nonsense.

73 de N8AUC
Eric
Logged
VK3BL
Member

Posts: 1351


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2017, 07:18:27 PM »

This is sad.

Coax patch cables should be something you make, not something you buy.

Putting a PL-259 on the end of a piece of coax correctly, isn't exactly rocket science.

And gain from a piece of cable? Sorry, that's nonsense.

73 de N8AUC
Eric


I found the original post quite humorous, self deprecation and jokes thrown in. 

I've found that if you're running barefoot any quality of coax will tend to 'work fine unnoticed', however, preparing cables to legal limit standards is another thing entirely.

Personally, I've invested around $300 usd just in termination tools for a variety of coaxial cables and twisted pair.  Good tools make all the difference between burning out a PL-259 socket (oxidising the female centre pin over time) and keeping them shiny gold.

Given what can go wrong with a bad termination at high power, unless you can justify investing in the tools (I'm a licensed cabler), then I highly recommend reaching out to someone who has got the tools and skills.

DX Engineering make the best value RG-8, RG-213 & LMR-400 crimp tool if you're into using Amphenol's connector series, as you should be.
Logged

J.D. Mitchell - VK3BL / XU7AGA - http://vk3bl.wordpress.com
KOP
Member

Posts: 245




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2017, 08:53:01 PM »

...and the score is 3 to 3 after 6 posts.















may the slack be with you
Logged

October 02, 2017, 07:53:41 PM
G4AON
Member

Posts: 1027




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2017, 06:23:45 AM »

Basic soldering is a requirement of the novice training in the UK, while I appreciate not many hams are going to build transceivers these days, I would be embarrassed to buy patch cables, except for those amazing value RG316 cables with SMA plugs from China on eBay... I can’t buy the plugs for their prices, let alone the crimp tool.

73 Dave
Logged
NK7Z
Member

Posts: 1844


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: November 05, 2017, 06:53:26 AM »

Dave (G4AON),
I am with you, if I had to buy a patch cable I would slink into and out of wherever I bought it/them from, hoping no one would see me...  I have a friend that watched a few Youtube videos, showing how to do coax connectors, (unfortunately for him, the ones he watched all said no need to solder the shield), and had to redo the entire set of cables for his new shack he built, three antenna, tower, plus lightening, etc., a very well thought out installation save the connectors.  

Something like 40 or more connectors in all.  He, at first, was going to buy cables and replace.  I managed to convince him that he needed to make his own cables, not buy them.  He is now on connector 30 or so, and can slam out a good coax connector in no time.  I doubt he will ever buy a jumper again...  He tests each one he makes with a meter and an antenna analyser and a 50 ohm resistor...  He is now getting about a 98% success rate, and able to run in SS, which is what he wanted to do.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2017, 06:57:22 AM by NK7Z » Logged

Thanks,
Dave
For reviews and setups see: http://www.nk7z.net
K0UA
Member

Posts: 1447




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2017, 08:51:17 AM »

OK, so if I have this right, and I buy enough of these patch cables with gain, and enough barrel connectors to splice them all together, I can forgo that Kilowatt amplifier?  I mean how much actual gain are we talking about here in each connection? Inquiring minds want to know. Grin ( I am hoping for about 3 dB per connector?)
Logged
KB2WIG
Member

Posts: 360




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: November 05, 2017, 12:49:57 PM »




I've herd the Vegan connectors have higher gain.


KLC
Logged
VK3BL
Member

Posts: 1351


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2017, 08:29:44 PM »

I'd rather be seen buying a patch cable knowing my own limits, than solder one poorly and take out a set of finals.

Each to their own, however.  I know one thing - I will never use a connector soldered by someone I don't trust, or soldered to the wrong kind of cable.

For example, LMR-400 SHOULD NOT be used with soldered connectors, full stop.  Its just *way* to easy to damage the foam.
Logged

J.D. Mitchell - VK3BL / XU7AGA - http://vk3bl.wordpress.com
WB4SPT
Member

Posts: 496




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: November 13, 2017, 01:49:23 PM »



For example, LMR-400 SHOULD NOT be used with soldered connectors, full stop.  Its just *way* to easy to damage the foam.

the trick is to use a wet sponge to cool the shell after each "hole" is soldered.  and use a multi-hundred watt iron. 
Logged
N6YFM
Member

Posts: 516




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: November 13, 2017, 04:03:38 PM »

Anyone can be taught to solder.   Anyone, that is, EXCEPT MFJ employees.

If you have a desire, someone in a local club can teach you.

I personally had more than 4 professionally made jumpers in the last 2 years that
were CRAP, and either shorted, or opened, or had the connector pull right off.
So I bought the strippers and connectors, both solder and crimp, both UHF and Type N,
and started making my own.   My first 2 were crap like the ones I bought.
The rest of them are far better than what I was buying.
I now make both LMR400 (RG-8 / RG-213 size), and also LMR-240UF / RG-8X size cables,
both with PL-259 UHF solder and crimp, and Type N crimp.
All of them have heat shrink tubing over the end.

For each cable, I run it on a high-pot insulation tester, and then do a sweep on
my antenna analyzer.    I am happy with  the results.   And I know who to blame
if I am not :-)

The BEST cable I have found for jumpers is the ABR Industries RG-8X and LMR-400UF types.
I bought several brands of cable and compared it to actual Times Microware cable.
I found the ABR Industries cable more flexible in both sizes, and much easier to work with the shield and foil.
[The Times Microwave LMR-240UF was also impossible to separate the foil shield from the white foam, for example,
so even using crimp connectors, it was very hard to prepare. Too much labor.]  I am VERY happy with ABR cable.

I no longer pay $35 for a jumper.    I pay $2 per connector, the coax price per foot,
and 20 minutes of my time.  Toss in a few pennies for heat shrink tubing, double layered on each end.

Anyone can do it, if you have a desire to learn.
If you don't, keep paying.

Neal
« Last Edit: November 13, 2017, 04:09:37 PM by N6YFM » Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!