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Author Topic: Kon Tiki expedition in 1947 was QRP power  (Read 2018 times)
AK0B
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« on: November 11, 2017, 09:49:13 PM »

 Kon Tiki expedition's transmitters were powered by batteries and a hand-cranked generator and operated on the 40, 20, 10, and 6-meter bands. Each unit was water resistant, used 2E30 vacuum tubes, and provided approximately 6 watts of RF output; the equivalent of a small flashlight

 Two British 3-16 MHz Mark II transmitters were also carried on board, as was a NC-173 receiver.

The trip lasted 101 days.

Stan AK0B
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KM1H
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Posts: 2677




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« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2017, 07:07:11 AM »

The NC-173 fell into the salt water on the way to the beach, was dried out and it worked fine. National ran full page magazine adds about that.

I have one here (along with many other vintage radios) that I fully overhauled and it far outperforms others without mods in the medium price range.

Carl
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KENNETH
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« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2017, 07:30:49 AM »

They said they were so low to the waterline, the swells would be above their head and it was like being inside an aquarium looking over , seeing fish swimming in the swells. Amazing.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2017, 10:53:37 AM »

When I crossed the Atlantic twice....54 & 56....it was like that....when I was able to get my head out of the puke barrel lashed to the deck!
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KL7KN
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« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2017, 12:47:45 PM »





Different times in 1947.  I read the book as a middle-school student.  Thought it was a cool story.

Read it again as an adult - what a difference some life experience makes....  for these guys making the trip in '47 - took a real of eeerrrr manhood.  IIRC,  All were ex-Commando, BTW. 

The last of the crew left us in 2010....

Think I will read again, good stuff for a cold snowy day.
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KA0USE
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« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2017, 05:58:35 PM »

THIS brings my archaeology/world regional geography/anthropology classes to life!
re: the spread of mankind and how the un-proveable COULD have been done.
we studied the northward spread of the micro/mela-niesians, too.
all fascinating and this just made it sweeter. we did discuss thor heyerdahl and ra, but no mention of radio.

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K1DA
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« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2017, 07:29:30 AM »

That was a time of very good band conditions which was also true of much of WWII.  Five watt German tank transmitters  were being followed from a very good radio spot in Scituate Rhode Island.
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OZ8AGB
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« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2017, 08:21:26 AM »

And no noise from switch mode psus, wifi etc.
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KM1H
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« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2017, 02:54:46 PM »

Quote
That was a time of very good band conditions which was also true of much of WWII.  Five watt German tank transmitters  were being followed from a very good radio spot in Scituate Rhode Island.

While not quite up to Cycle 19, Cycle 18 was a good performer and listening to relatives "All Band" radios was what got me interested in ham radio and in time to enjoy Cycle 19 with a Novice in 1955.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_solar_cycles

Carl
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