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Author Topic: Yup, there are signals on 630 m.  (Read 1189 times)
WA9CFK
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Posts: 174




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« on: November 14, 2017, 07:20:31 AM »

For those of us who not involved in the digital world that can reach into the noise and extract a useable signal, I was curious as to how useful the 630 meter band would be.

Before jumping into a big winter project, I connected one side of of the ladder line that feeds my 80 meter loop to my receiver tuned down to 475 KHz.

Sure enough a CW signal was present. Over several days I world spend the hour between 9 and 10 pm EST monitoring the band. While the band was not hopping with signals, I did hear several good QSOs from different call zones plus a few down in the noise. It is safe to say you will do a bit of listening.

It was encouraging enough to warrant spending the time to build a resonant receiving antenna and to try to capture some of the weaker signals. Then see what the transmitting side is all about. Monitoring the USB  I heard a few digital signals as well.

It appears to be a great band for the incessant tinkerer and it is simple enough to connect one side of your antenna wire and give a listen.


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N3HEE
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Posts: 453


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« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2017, 12:19:09 PM »

I captured at least a dozen WSPR stations the other night on 630 meters.  This was just using my 160 meter inverted L.  Rig was a TS-590SG.  Farthest distance heard was 1350 miles. I did not tune around to check for CW signals.  I will do that next.   I want to come up with a cheap and easy way to transmit using very low power into a compact (poor) antenna.  I live on a 90 x 130 foot lot.  This will be a great challenge.  Hopefully the digital modes will help make up for poor antenna and low power and allow me to make a few contacts?
« Last Edit: November 14, 2017, 12:21:49 PM by N3HEE » Logged

Joe
N3HEE
CW Academy Advisor (Level II)
K0OD
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Posts: 2988




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« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2017, 01:34:42 PM »

North American 630-Meters 24-hour WSPR summary. That's just one frequency, 474.2 KHz. CW and other modes aren't shown. 

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K0OD
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Posts: 2988




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« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2017, 01:41:43 PM »

Might as well show the 24 hour EU activity too. Incredible!

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AA2UK
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Posts: 375




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« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2017, 02:54:39 PM »

I captured at least a dozen WSPR stations the other night on 630 meters.  This was just using my 160 meter inverted L.  Rig was a TS-590SG.  Farthest distance heard was 1350 miles. I did not tune around to check for CW signals.  I will do that next.   I want to come up with a cheap and easy way to transmit using very low power into a compact (poor) antenna.  I live on a 90 x 130 foot lot.  This will be a great challenge.  Hopefully the digital modes will help make up for poor antenna and low power and allow me to make a few contacts?
Joe I would use the 160 inverted L into a base loaded coil with a Variometer for TX. There's lots of reading material about various homebrew ATU/Variometer & transverter projects. I believe the MF Solutions transverter configured as a Ts\X converter will get you abt 20 watts on 630 meters. I don't have the links handy or I would post.
Bill, AA2UK
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AA2UK
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« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2017, 08:35:16 AM »

Do you think you will try digital on 630 meters? It's a great way to measure system improvements & performance.
WSPR and JT9 are the main modes. I've copied stations in Arizona from Southern NJ.
It's not unusual to copy WSPR stations out to 1500 miles most nights. I'm also thrilled to see stations using CW as well. Most operators use a balance of digital and CW.
Bill, AA2UK
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 08:38:58 AM by AA2UK » Logged
N3HEE
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« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2017, 08:45:12 AM »

Thanks for the info Bill. I will get on if I can do it fairly easily and cheap.  Not looking to invest much time or $$ in this project but very interested to see what I can do on 630 meters on my tiny lot.
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Joe
N3HEE
CW Academy Advisor (Level II)
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