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   Home   Help Search  
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Author Topic: New SDRPlay RSP1A  (Read 3302 times)
N2DTS
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Posts: 744




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« Reply #30 on: November 23, 2017, 11:45:57 AM »

Spectraview had markers and so on, more of a test equipment look.
Was used on the rf space radios like the sdr-iq.
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K5TED
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Posts: 100




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« Reply #31 on: November 23, 2017, 12:32:35 PM »

Got RSP1A running last night. Works great. Sounds great. Fewer spurious signals across the bands. Good sensitivity on all bands. Nice wideband radio for $99.
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VA3VF
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Posts: 926




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« Reply #32 on: November 23, 2017, 12:37:23 PM »

Got RSP1A running last night. Works great. Sounds great. Fewer spurious signals across the bands. Good sensitivity on all bands. Nice wideband radio for $99.

What software are you using to drive it? Have you tried different software?

I'll test with HDSDR, SDRConsole, SDR# (if an old DLL works), and SDR Uno.
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K5TED
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Posts: 100




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« Reply #33 on: November 23, 2017, 01:18:32 PM »

SDRUno.
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W9CW
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Posts: 148




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« Reply #34 on: November 23, 2017, 05:42:58 PM »

An affordable SDR with an Ethernet interface is available (plus USB 2.0), and has been for some time, as I bought mine over two years ago...  the AFEDRI SDR-Net $259.00.  This is manufactured by 4Z5LV in Israel.  100kHz to 35MHz.  See these links for more info.

http://afedri-sdr.com/

http://afedri-sdr.com/index.php/ordering-information

73
Don W9CW
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K7LZR
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Posts: 66




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« Reply #35 on: November 24, 2017, 08:01:37 AM »

An affordable SDR with an Ethernet interface is available (plus USB 2.0), and has been for some time, as I bought mine over two years ago...  the AFEDRI SDR-Net $259.00.  This is manufactured by 4Z5LV in Israel.  100kHz to 35MHz.  See these links for more info.

http://afedri-sdr.com/

http://afedri-sdr.com/index.php/ordering-information

73
Don W9CW

That looks like a very nice unit but the lack of VHF/UHF coverage is a show stopper for me. But I'd bet that its a real performer within its range Smiley.
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AE5X
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Posts: 1029




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« Reply #36 on: November 24, 2017, 10:48:14 AM »

What do you guys use these radios for? I would love to have one to tinker with and tune around the bands exploring their capabilities. But after that... Huh

If the SW broadcast were what they used to be I'd definitely get one but those days are gone with not much more than religious programming and I'm wondering what else the HF spectrum offers.

It seems ironic to me that all this cool SDR software technology is so affordable and yet the bands are so devoid of interesting content. It's like finally getting a sports car you've been wanting for decades...but not being allowed any gasoline.
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VA3VF
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Posts: 926




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« Reply #37 on: November 24, 2017, 10:52:12 AM »

What do you guys use these radios for? I would love to have one to tinker with and tune around the bands exploring their capabilities. But after that... Huh

If the SW broadcast were what they used to be I'd definitely get one but those days are gone with not much more than religious programming and I'm wondering what else the HF spectrum offers.

It seems ironic to me that all this cool SDR software technology is so affordable and yet the bands are so devoid of interesting content. It's like finally getting a sports car you've been wanting for decades...but not being allowed any gasoline.

A panadapter seems to be the main use among hams. But there are also skimmers and WSJT-X spot feeders.

Other than that, MW and FM broadcast DXing. ADS-B monitoring and feeding. One area that is very interesting is utility DXing (HFDL, NDB, DSC, Navtex, etc) .
« Last Edit: November 24, 2017, 10:55:39 AM by VA3VF » Logged
ZENKI
Member

Posts: 1439




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« Reply #38 on: November 24, 2017, 08:21:27 PM »

You could use a bank of 8 or more RSP1As that are phased locked for beam steering or direction finding.

With Say 8 receivers and 8 active whip antennas you could achieve 1 degree accuracy using whats called Watson Watt direction finding.

Even with say  3 to 8 receivers and something like  3 to 8 loop antennas you could use single site location to find  any source of interference. You will need to know the height of the ionosphere to complete the calculation. You can do this by using modelling or ion probe the ionosphere with your own SDR radiosonde

These RSP1A's would have to be phased locked and the AGC disabled, but thats not a  hard thing to do these days.

Radio direction finding and beam steering  to fight QRM or improving hearing is the next frontier in Direct Sampling SDR technology for hams. Its old hat for governments and the military  who can  tell you your house number with these single site location direction finding systems.

What do you guys use these radios for? I would love to have one to tinker with and tune around the bands exploring their capabilities. But after that... Huh

If the SW broadcast were what they used to be I'd definitely get one but those days are gone with not much more than religious programming and I'm wondering what else the HF spectrum offers.

It seems ironic to me that all this cool SDR software technology is so affordable and yet the bands are so devoid of interesting content. It's like finally getting a sports car you've been wanting for decades...but not being allowed any gasoline.

A panadapter seems to be the main use among hams. But there are also skimmers and WSJT-X spot feeders.

Other than that, MW and FM broadcast DXing. ADS-B monitoring and feeding. One area that is very interesting is utility DXing (HFDL, NDB, DSC, Navtex, etc) .
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K5TED
Member

Posts: 100




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« Reply #39 on: November 25, 2017, 08:21:05 PM »

What do you guys use these radios for? I would love to have one to tinker with and tune around the bands exploring their capabilities. But after that... Huh

If the SW broadcast were what they used to be I'd definitely get one but those days are gone with not much more than religious programming and I'm wondering what else the HF spectrum offers.

It seems ironic to me that all this cool SDR software technology is so affordable and yet the bands are so devoid of interesting content. It's like finally getting a sports car you've been wanting for decades...but not being allowed any gasoline.

Agree. It is ironic. Oh well.. Interesting is in the ear of the beholder...
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N2DTS
Member

Posts: 744




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« Reply #40 on: November 26, 2017, 02:49:18 PM »

I run three receivers when I am on the air, the homebrew tube RX, the 7300 and the Anan.
If I did not have the Anan I might use the rsp2. I know I would have SOME sdr working for the multi mode, filters, hifi audio and the band scope.
If you keep the gain down the rsp2 works fine.
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