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Author Topic: why "machine gun" high speed CW  (Read 3264 times)
K3UIM
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Posts: 31




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« Reply #30 on: December 02, 2017, 07:45:05 AM »

You know what's frustrating? Having once been into the "music" of cw at 20 or more wpm and then, after a 25 year absence from it, to try to keep up with 10 wpm. sigh It's maddening. Hi.
Charlie
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K0UA
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Posts: 1464




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« Reply #31 on: December 02, 2017, 07:49:32 AM »

You know what's frustrating? Having once been into the "music" of cw at 20 or more wpm and then, after a 25 year absence from it, to try to keep up with 10 wpm. sigh It's maddening. Hi.
Charlie

Well Charlie, don't you think if you work at it a bit you will get back to where you were?
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K8AXW
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Posts: 6378




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« Reply #32 on: December 02, 2017, 10:14:01 AM »

UIM:  Frustrating? Yes...but also very sad.  It takes a great deal of work to be able to enjoy the "music" of 20wpm CW and then to let it slip away.

However, UA is very right....a little practice and you'll be back up to speed....maybe not as good as previously but good enough so that a little more practice will get you there.

I'm presently experiencing the same frustration, only with my sending.  My old hands simple aren't flexible anymore and it is now impossible to work my keyer as before....I have a hard time writing a check legibly!

BUT, I can still head copy 25wpm!. I hate the thought of losing that so I listen once in a while. 

I have to recommend to anyone who copies code to have some kind of device, either handheld, a receiver or even the computer to listen to code once in a while.  With code the phrase, "Use it or lose it" is partly true.  I doubt if one really "loses" it!
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K3UIM
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Posts: 31




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« Reply #33 on: December 02, 2017, 11:30:29 AM »

Well Charlie, don't you think if you work at it a bit you will get back to where you were? [/quote]
You gotta hear em to work em!
sigh
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NO2A
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Posts: 1203




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« Reply #34 on: December 02, 2017, 12:22:06 PM »

If you can,good for you. And God bless!
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VK5EEE
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Posts: 1178




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« Reply #35 on: December 02, 2017, 05:36:52 PM »

I didn't use CW for 20 to 30 years, not listen, not thought of it. I got busy with mid life things as happens to so many so just forgot about the hobby. When I came back to it, I had lost nothing: I could still send the same (45WPM iambic) and receive the same (60-70WPM plain English). I think the difference between not losing it over a very long time of no usage, and falling back severely, is whether or not one had "mastered" it before ceasing to use it.

I think once you've mastered something it is very hard to lose it, other than perhaps with brain cell problems that happens when we age, but I'm not sure as haven't been there yet, and I know an OM in his 90s who still sends 40 WPM or so on a keyer.

I don't think many hams that use CW actually ever ended up "mastering" it as it was still fresh, and still in the learning phase, and often by the wrong method which forced a transition from converting images to sound and vice versa to just recognising the sound, and thus the learning placed unnecessary hurdles.

The other factor now doubt is that when you learn something before you're even 10 years old and had already achieved a comfortable speed of 25 WPM and continue to use it for a couple decades, surely then it's also hard to lose.

But nevertheless, it WILL come back to you, just avoid stress, enjoy it at *whatever* speed, and when possible immerse yourself in it as K8AXW was suggesting, this surely helps just to be listening even without trying or stressing, it will start to fall into place again.
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever

Support CW and join CW clubs. QTT: FIST#1124, HSC#1437, UFT#728, RCWC#982, SKCC#15007, CWOPS#1714, 30CW#1,
VK4FFAB
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Posts: 424




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« Reply #36 on: December 02, 2017, 06:29:12 PM »

I think once you've mastered something it is very hard to lose it, other than perhaps with brain cell problems that happens when we age, but I'm not sure as haven't been there yet, and I know an OM in his 90s who still sends 40 WPM or so on a keyer.

I don't think many hams that use CW actually ever ended up "mastering" it as it was still fresh, and still in the learning phase, and often by the wrong method which forced a transition from converting images to sound and vice versa to just recognising the sound, and thus the learning placed unnecessary hurdles.

You are probably correct, I know I spend most my youth boxing and doing martial arts to a very high standard, and while my body cannot move like it once did, the brain knows how to make those moves even if the limbs cannot follow it, the same goes with guitar and drums, i have not played in years, though did at a semi professional level back in my 20's i just picked up my guitar and ran through some chords and scales and other then my arthritic hands not liking it, i still know how to play. I think if you have become proficient at anything, its burned into the brain and even after a long time, the ability still remains as long as the body can accommodate what you are asking of it.
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K8AXW
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Posts: 6378




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« Reply #37 on: December 02, 2017, 08:16:41 PM »

Quote
I think once you've mastered something it is very hard to lose it,

I think that says it all......perhaps explains why I can still head copy 25wpm even with my sparse operating these days.  I never considered this.
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 4457




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« Reply #38 on: December 08, 2017, 07:26:26 AM »

An example of Commercial telegraphy operation and guidelines can be found at
the following website www.radiomarine.org (Maritime Radio Historical Society).

      note: They ordered their Vibroplex bugs directly from the factory, and they
               had Vibroplex supply the weights that kept the Operators confined
               to CW speeds between 20 wpm and 25 wpm.


                                  73,
                                       Bob
 

How?

I have four Vibroplexes and the range of speed adjustment with the standard weights is much greater - easily 15 to 40 wpm or more. If special ones were ordered with extra-heavy weights, they'd just go slower.

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N2EY
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Posts: 4457




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« Reply #39 on: December 08, 2017, 07:35:06 AM »

   I learned Morse Code in 1959 to get a 5 wpm Novice ticket, then a 13 wpm General ticket,
and my traditional comfort level is 18 wpm to 20 wpm. Given the fact that the CW speed
guidelines for Commercial telegraphy and Military telegraphy have always been 20 wpm
to 25 wpm, why do a lot of Amateurs feel the need to operate at 35 wpm and beyond?
             

Because we can!

Commercial and military code users were often limited by a number of factors:

1) The receiving operator could be copying with a pencil and paper, or a mill (manual typewriter). In such situations, the real limiting factor is how fast the op can print or type accurately and legibly. In amateur QSOs that are conversations, that limitation does not apply.

2) Many transmitters used in such services were remote controlled and keyed by relays. The maximum reliable keying speed of such rigs was often not all that fast. Many amateur transmitters, old and new, do not have such limitations, and can key reliably at 40+ wpm.

3) To the commercial and military folks, radiotelegraphy was a means to an end, not the end itself. To hams it is an end in itself. Going faster is fun for many hams - so we do.

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