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Author Topic: Dash Mount  (Read 1344 times)
KD9FRQ
Member

Posts: 178




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« on: December 08, 2017, 06:34:19 AM »

I have not seen any In Dash mount kits for any 2m or 2m/70cm radios.

Do they exist?

Thought I would replace the FM/CD player.
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K6CPO
Member

Posts: 404




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« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2017, 01:10:50 PM »

Maybe the manufacturers assume nobody would be replacing their OEM vehicle radios...
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K0UA
Member

Posts: 1458




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« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2017, 01:44:05 PM »

In my opinion, no they do not exist.  I have put several radios in dashes of cars and trucks, and it has all been custom make your own brackets and fillers. Last one was a month  ago in Chrysler Minivan, into the bottom of the stack using the "cubbyhole". I just make some little brackets to hold it in place that wrapped around the front where I could drive a color matched screw into the plastic to hold it in. 

 Like everything else in life, if you want it bad enough you will figure it out.  If you don't want it that bad, then you wont.  To fabricate costume things, just takes lots thought, and sometimes trial and error.
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 17189




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« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2017, 03:24:36 PM »

My old Honda Odyssey has a couple unused holes in the dash for switches for options
that my model doesn't have.  The holes are filled with plastic plugs.  I just popped out
one of the plugs and screwed it to a wood board with a couple brackets to hold the
control head of my radio, then popped it back in the hole.

I had used something similar in one of the in-dash slots in a different car:  the radio
wouldn't fit in the hole, but by popping out the plastic liner I could make a wooden
piece that screwed to it and held the control head.

I probably should have bought some spare covers back when the car was newer so I had
some spares.  But with almost 300K miles on the car, I'm not as worried now about what
it looks like.
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K0UA
Member

Posts: 1458




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« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2017, 03:45:30 PM »

My old Honda Odyssey has a couple unused holes in the dash for switches for options
that my model doesn't have.  The holes are filled with plastic plugs.  I just popped out
one of the plugs and screwed it to a wood board with a couple brackets to hold the
control head of my radio, then popped it back in the hole.

I had used something similar in one of the in-dash slots in a different car:  the radio
wouldn't fit in the hole, but by popping out the plastic liner I could make a wooden
piece that screwed to it and held the control head.

I probably should have bought some spare covers back when the car was newer so I had
some spares.  But with almost 300K miles on the car, I'm not as worried now about what
it looks like.

I had a beautiful in dash install in my 2000 Silverado.  Full integrated with a custom trim plate. a speaker installed in the unused overhead area that would have housed a trip computer I think that my truck didn't have.  I carefully drilled many grille holes and installed the speaker in this overhead compartment.  Man did it work, sound and look great!.    Then the truck got wrecked with 39,000 miles.   Oh well.   
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K5LXP
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Posts: 5339


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« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2017, 10:29:04 AM »


Stereo DIN mounts are easy to find.  What is the work is adapting a given radio to be DIN-space compatible.

I did this with my Ranger pickup last year:


I made the escutcheon out of delrin, and had to fabricate a bracket that held it to the radio using aluminum angle stock.    Had to fabricate a bracket that held the AM/FM and 2M radio "stack" together as a sandwich that then slides onto the dash support rail.  Power is via powerpole, regular speaker and RG-58 antenna connections.  1/8" jack to the right of the tuning control is for programming via CHIRP.  Used the cigarette lighter hole for mic cord egress, which has worked out well.  When not in use I push the cord in the hole for storage.

Probably the biggest plus to doing this is the radio is right where you want to look at it, instead of near the floor under the dash.  For all the work that goes into it, you almost need to buy an identical spare rig in case the one in the dash dies, so you don't have to start from scratch with a different radio.

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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NEVBEN
Member

Posts: 107




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« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2017, 05:53:47 PM »

I wish there were a monoband 2 meter radio with a remote control head, but I have not seen one yet.  It seems to only be a feature of expensive radios that have lots of features I want to avoid.

I think what the OP requires is a DIN adapter that they may have to fabricate themselves.

Before you consider replacing the factory audio amplifier, consider using it first.  The audio amplifiers on amateur mobiles are horrible.  They typically put out somewhere between 3W and 5W audio at 10% THD, and the built-in speakers are junk.  Adding an external speaker can only help a little because you're still using that 3W/10% distorted amp.

Factory receivers can be expected to at least provide useable 4W per channel.  This would be the system in a base model Ford for example.  It would have about 6dB more useable audio power than a Kenwood, ICOM or Yaesu per channel, and you could use two to four channels instead of one.  The speakers might have slightly less sensitivity, but they will sound much better.

In my vehicle, I use a modest ($100) aftermarket receiver with a spec of 4x50W (MOSFET) power.  For full bandwidth, the power is 22W per channel at 1% THD.  That's enough to give me 8.5 dB audio gain at 1% THD over the transceiver's level at 10% THD.  If you operate with any background noise such as engine, tire and highway noise, it's well worth it to have the amplifier power for sufficient sound pressure level without distortion.  The transceiver can get plenty loud, but not without bad distortion.  I don't crank my external amp very loud, but use it for clean power.

For my base station where I also use a mobile transceiver, I use a 12V 150W Rockford Fosgate amp ($78) with an external speaker.  Again, it provides ample power at <1%THD.  Unfortunately, the distortion in my TH-281A is so bad I can barely drive the Rockford to a loud level without turning the gain so high I get excessive levels of noise (white noise).  The audio on my Yaesu FT-2900R is worse.

I have more powerful audio amplifiers, but would not use them with these mobiles because the audio quality going into the amp is simply not good enough to warrant it.  But a vehicle's factory stereo amp or modest aftermarket amp like the ones I mentioned will deliver worthwhile results.

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M0GVZ
Member

Posts: 344




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« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2017, 11:23:23 AM »

I use Brodit Proclip mounts for radios with a detachable head. They're custom made for every vehicle and don't require screws to hold them in place. Most vehicles have an option of two or three different mounting points. Whilst they're supposed to be for mobile phones you can screw the mounting bracket for a mobile radio to them. I use one to mount the head of my Kenwood TS480SAT on. Given that that is about the heaviest head unit you'll ever find and it supports it with ease then using one won't be an issue.

This is the one for my car (Ford Mondeo sold as Taurus in the USA)



And here it is with the head unit on.

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