Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: SO-50 satellite question  (Read 761 times)
KU4UV
Member

Posts: 433




Ignore
« on: November 27, 2017, 07:28:13 AM »

I tried to work SO-50 early this morning around 6:00 local time here in Kentucky during an 89 degree pass.  I didn't hear any stations from the satellite.  This is odd, as I heard stations last night during the pass.  Any thoughts on why sometimes the satellite appears to "asleep,"  and sometimes it is active? 

73,
KU4UV
Logged
K6LCS
Member

Posts: 1995


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2017, 07:38:48 AM »

It was possible that no one else was attempting to work it during that pass. Did you send it a 74.4 CTCSS tone to activate it, then try to work it?
Logged

Clint Bradford, K6LCS
http://www.work-sat.com
KJ4HVL
Member

Posts: 76




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2017, 11:04:54 AM »

Greetings to another Kentuckian! As a ground station OP at MSU, we found that some satellites would sleep during their eclipse phase (power saving when dark)... Additionally some GMSK modes are wider than the FM voice passband. You will hear your radio squelch open, but can't get into or out of the bird when they are downlinking data.

Other times when the earth appears "hot" (lots of ham activity) the satellite rx will de-sense and it can be hard to get into them without a whole lot of gain.

Additionally geomagnetic activity can play a role. Sometimes especially when the bird is north of KY the aurora can block signals.

I don't know if any of those are the case.
Logged
KU4UV
Member

Posts: 433




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2017, 12:23:13 PM »

It was possible that no one else was attempting to work it during that pass. Did you send it a 74.4 CTCSS tone to activate it, then try to work it?

Yes, I thought about that.  I tried to "wake" the satellite by sending my call and grid when I transmitted.  Still didn't get any reply.

73,
Ku4UV
Logged
KU4UV
Member

Posts: 433




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2017, 12:26:05 PM »

Greetings to another Kentuckian! As a ground station OP at MSU, we found that some satellites would sleep during their eclipse phase (power saving when dark)... Additionally some GMSK modes are wider than the FM voice passband. You will hear your radio squelch open, but can't get into or out of the bird when they are downlinking data.

Other times when the earth appears "hot" (lots of ham activity) the satellite rx will de-sense and it can be hard to get into them without a whole lot of gain.

Additionally geomagnetic activity can play a role. Sometimes especially when the bird is north of KY the aurora can block signals.

I don't know if any of those are the case.

Hello from Richmond.  I graduated from EKU with a degree in Broadcasting back in 1997.  This morning, SO-50 came down from the North, over Alaska and Canada, so that may be the case.  Thanks!

73,
Mike KU4UV
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!