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Author Topic: Help understanding the band chart v. SSB  (Read 677 times)
K4JUL
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Posts: 47




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« on: November 28, 2017, 06:33:24 PM »

I tested for and received my Tech and Gen license last Spring, but a) it was pretty much information overload at the time (but I passed well), and b) it was quite awhile before I got an HF-capable radio (an IC-7100) and I still do not have an antenna setup to start utilizing the HF side of things.... I am now re-learning as I go.  So, those are my caveats (aka 'excuses').

So ... my plan is to start with a simple 20m dipole in the attic (CC&Rs / HOA-cops) and I think I'm decently dialed in on how to go about that.  But I heard a guy recently say that "you've gotta be able to do SSB".  OK .. my band diagram (ARRL, new) has red, yellow and green zones etc on the various bands, and red says "RTTY and data" while yellow says "SSB phone", and green says "phone and image".  So ... is SSB only for digital / data communications, or does 'phone' mean SSB or no-SSB?

There's a local net, about 200 miles away, on 20m that's digital but I don't remember which mode, that I'd like to get involved in.  And maybe I'm old fashioned, but phone sounds fun too ... I do not want to violate the rules on SSB ... if someone could give me a 2-sentence refresher on that ... versus what the colors completely mean ... on the band diagram, that'd be great ... just a short summary, really.  I ask here, even though YouTube and other places abound with knowledge and info, because I suspect others in my situation may appreciate knowing the answers without sticking their necks out like I'm doing.... chop away All!

Brian K4JUL
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WW7KE
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Posts: 605




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« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2017, 06:57:24 PM »

So ... my plan is to start with a simple 20m dipole in the attic (CC&Rs / HOA-cops) and I think I'm decently dialed in on how to go about that.  But I heard a guy recently say that "you've gotta be able to do SSB".  OK .. my band diagram (ARRL, new) has red, yellow and green zones etc on the various bands, and red says "RTTY and data" while yellow says "SSB phone", and green says "phone and image".  So ... is SSB only for digital / data communications, or does 'phone' mean SSB or no-SSB?

Generals are allowed all privileges where the letter "G" is shown in the chart.  On 20, that means you get 14.025-14.150 MHz for CW and Data (the latter is mostly above 14.060, CW below), and 14.225-14.350 MHz for phone and image.  USB phone is the standard, but you can also run SSTV on 14.230 (analog) and 14.233 (digital) with your license.  I haven't heard AM phone on 20 in years, but it's still legal.  I don't know the common AM frequency, if there is one anymore.

The yellow bar in the 10 meter chart is for Technicians and the few remaining Novices, who are only allowed SSB phone between 28.300 and 28.500 MHz.  You have your General, so don't worry about it.
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He speaks fluent PSK31...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
WB6BYU
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Posts: 17182




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« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2017, 07:38:39 PM »

"Phone" includes SSB, AM, and possibly some other voice modes.  So SSB is fine.
(USB is used above 10 MHz by common convention, and LSB below.)

Just don't use SSB VOICE in the CW/DATA segments.  (It's OK to set your rig to
SSB to use your computer to send various digital modes, however.)
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N7EKU
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Posts: 721




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« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2017, 02:59:07 AM »

"Phone" includes SSB, AM, and possibly some other voice modes.

...and CW.

ICOM make a better chart (IMO) than the ARRL:

http://www.icomamerica.com/en/downloads/DownloadDetails.aspx?Document=331

Cheers and 73,


Mark.
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Mark -- N7EKU/VE3
KC8Y
Member

Posts: 476




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« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2017, 04:02:20 AM »

The chart on ICOM url  IS BETTER than the one on ARRL site.

Thanks Mark.  Good morning Smiley

Ken KC8Y
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WA3SKN
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Posts: 6523




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« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2017, 05:57:48 AM »

The REAL answer here is what is in the FCC present rules and regs.

However, a crash course for General class SSB... HF I assume...
80 meters
3.8---4.0 MHz LSB.
40 meters
7.175---7.3 MHz LSB.
20 meters
14.225---14.350 MHz USB.
17 meters
18.110---18.168 MHz USB.
15 meters
21.275---21.450 MHz USB.
Stay 3 kHz away from the band edges.

Other bands available but this should get you going.  Propagation is on the down side at this time.  80 and 40 meters are nighttime bands, 20 and above are best in daytime.  This is not 2 sentences, but should get you in the right direction.
73s. Hope to hear you on the air!

-Mike.
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AC2EU
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Posts: 1214


WWW

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« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2017, 06:14:50 AM »

I'll try yo boil it down a little simpler yet by saying the sideband rules for HF are:

LSB used below 20 meters

USB used on 20 meters and above.

Generally speaking, the digital/cw "specific" area is the lower portion of the the band. but CW is allowed throughout the bands.

Phone is the upper portion of the band.

Consult the chart for frequencies to use with your privileges.

Enjoy!
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