Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Installing PL-259 Connectors  (Read 2593 times)
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 8140




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: December 03, 2017, 02:24:11 AM »

I use the WB6BYU method. Use ONLY silver plated Teflon insulated connectors, and use a 1800 watt hot air paint stripping gun to heat the body of the connector - faster than an iron or soldering gun. When the solder melts, use a 40 watt Weller iron to keep it hot while soldering the braid through the holes.

Tubing cutter and paint stripping hot air gun are the magic tools!
Logged
WA3SKN
Member

Posts: 6520




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2017, 06:16:52 AM »

I have seen a lot of both good and bad installations of PL259 connectors.  And it does relate to frequency.  At VHF and above you care more about this.  Your installation is OK from an impedance point of view.  I would be concerned about water ingress and also stress related movements, but electrically it would be OK below 300 MHz or so.  Duration could also be a concern.
You can get away with a lot at HF!
73s.

-Mike.
Logged
WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 17171




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: December 03, 2017, 07:47:09 AM »

Quote from: WA3SKN

I have seen a lot of both good and bad installations of PL259 connectors...




And this is the key part:  getting a good, reliable connection for your application.

If the cable only gets moved every few years, a lot of connection methods will
work.  If it regularly gets flexed back and forth (either as a patch cable, for a
portable antenna, or due to the antenna blowing in the wind) then it may not
last as long.

But most important is to use the method that allows you to make the best
connection.


If you don't have a big soldering iron or hot air gun available to use, then you might
not be able to get a good connection to the shell, and twisting the connector onto
the folded braid might be your best bet.  Use a method that you are competent at
and capable of making a good connection in preference to one that might be better
when done by a trained technician, but that you don't have the skills or tools to
do correctly.


I have a lot of PL-259 connectors on hand.  Mostly I use smaller cables (often RG-58,
sometimes RG-59 or RG-8X) with crimp connectors if I have the right size in stock. 
I don't have to make up new RG-213 cables very often, so they are generally soldered
because I don't think I have crimp connectors for them. 

Then I get something quirky, like RG-14, and have to improvise something...

This is what I have found works best for me over the years, but you may have other
methods that work better for you.  What's important is to check your connectors to see
that they are still working properly.  I've seen a lot of "antenna" problems that were due
to a poor shield connection, and it isn't always immediately obvious what is wrong.
Logged
K5LXP
Member

Posts: 5329


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #18 on: December 03, 2017, 08:00:07 AM »


Of course the center conductor will break on a crimped connector, before it pulls out - it pretty much has to.  Same as on a soldered connector.  It's the jacket connection that is generally weaker.

Correct.  So what difference does it make if it's crimped or soldered?  The answer is it doesn't.  The variability is in the prep and the crimper.  In production the prep is automated and crimp dies and pressures are calibrated and certified.  Enter Joe Ham.  Cable prep is whatever is sharp and handy, strips are by eye, and the crimp tool is whatever was cheapest on ebay.  So it's not that crimp is inherently less reliable, the procedure drives reliability.  No different than improper soldering, just different failure modes.   

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
Logged
G4AON
Member

Posts: 1027




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: December 03, 2017, 10:50:59 AM »

For several years I’ve only used compression fitting PL259 plugs for both RG58 and RG213 cables. These fit the same way as BNC and N connectors, they can be reused if necessary too.

The plugs are more expensive, but hassle free to fit (or refit).

73 Dave
Logged
K6BRN
Member

Posts: 488




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: December 04, 2017, 01:06:26 PM »

Mark (K5LXP):

You are barking up the wrong tree.  I never said tbat crimped connectors are less reliable.  You drew that conclusion yourself from my pull test comments.  Get over it.  This is NOT a political issue. 

I' ve used all three methods and all can work fine... If you have tbe knowledge and skills to use them.

Pick one.

Brian - K6BRN
Logged
N7EKU
Member

Posts: 718




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: December 04, 2017, 01:22:03 PM »

For several years I’ve only used compression fitting PL259 plugs for both RG58 and RG213 cables. These fit the same way as BNC and N connectors, they can be reused if necessary too.

The plugs are more expensive, but hassle free to fit (or refit).

73 Dave

Hi Dave,

Do you have a part number, and/or source, for these?  I bet they would save headaches for many hams.  Currently I use the BNC ones like this for just the same reason: you can easily detach and re-attach them as needed.  Also they are quite reliable and easy to check too, if you suspect a problem.  I have never seen 259 ones like that though.

73,


Mark.
Logged

Mark -- N7EKU/VE3
N9AOP
Member

Posts: 664




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: December 04, 2017, 02:04:11 PM »

 I used to solder them, now I use crimps.  But I never recycled old connectors.  The old guy who taught me to solder 259's told me not to be a cheap ass and use new ones.
Art
Logged
KA5ROW
Member

Posts: 546


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #23 on: December 04, 2017, 06:30:00 PM »

I would use only Amphenol connectors. Why they are much better, and saw reviews stating with copy PL-259 the center will fall out due to the melting of the connector, Amphenol does not have that problem.   
Logged
WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 17171




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: December 04, 2017, 07:40:00 PM »

I certainly have some of the cheap ones where the center plastic is intended
to look like Teflon, but melts easily during soldering.  The nickel plating on
some connectors can be hard to solder to, too, especially for those lacking
a suitably big iron or heat source.

While the phenolic insulation of the traditional Amphenol plugs usually survives
the soldering process, the Teflon / silver plated plugs tend to be easier to
solder and work very well.


Reusing plugs?  Sure, if you have new ones available, go ahead and use them.
But some of us couldn't afford them when we started, and I've certainly been in
situations where they weren't available when I needed then, like in a logging
camp in Alaska, or late at night when I need a cable for the next day.  The
PL-259 plugs assembled with reducers for RG-58 or RG-59 are generally pretty
easy to disassemble and reuse.  Those where the whole shell is well soldered
much less so.
Logged
SWMAN
Member

Posts: 1084




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: December 04, 2017, 08:32:19 PM »

I first started soldering PL 259 when I was 13 years old, never really had a problem in doing it correctly. Now about 50 years later I can almost do it with my eyes closed. I can't speak for crimp on or solderless types as I have never used them. I don't like them, that's just me though.
Logged
WA1RNE
Member

Posts: 999




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: December 05, 2017, 09:21:59 AM »

Quote
For years I have been installing my PL-259 connectors by folding back the braid then screwing the connector down over the braid and outer layer of the connector.

  I would not recommend this assembly technique .

Although designed by Amphenol in the 30's, the threads were to my knowledge not meant to screw onto the outer jacket with braid in between.

The mechanics of that are poor, both from the standpoint of relying on shield to connector thread contact that will vary as the outer jacket contracts and expands with temperature AND in terms of connection mechanical strength and support.

 
Logged
NK7Z
Member

Posts: 1844


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #27 on: December 05, 2017, 09:49:52 AM »

Reusing plugs?  Sure, if you have new ones available, go ahead and use them.
But some of us couldn't afford them when we started, and I've certainly been in
situations where they weren't available when I needed then, like in a logging
camp in Alaska, or late at night when I need a cable for the next day.
I'm with you...  If I can, I use new, if not, then I clean up a connector.  I detest using old connectors in general though.
Logged

Thanks,
Dave
For reviews and setups see: http://www.nk7z.net
G4AON
Member

Posts: 1027




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: December 06, 2017, 01:18:12 AM »

Hi Dave,

Do you have a part number, and/or source, for these?  I bet they would save headaches for many hams.  Currently I use the BNC ones like this for just the same reason: you can easily detach and re-attach them as needed.  Also they are quite reliable and easy to check too, if you suspect a problem.  I have never seen 259 ones like that though.

73,

Mark.
Mark, they are made by Multicomp. Newark (http://www.newark.com) sell them. Part number 27AC8527 and 27AC8528

73 Dave
Logged
N2SR
Member

Posts: 652




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: December 06, 2017, 03:27:16 AM »

Suggest "installing a PL-259" be the topic of the next radio club meeting.  Advertise in the newsletter to make sure that everyone is aware of this meeting.   Invite the public, and also advertise in QST that your local radio club will be having a meeting on an extremely important topic that could change the world of Amateur Radio as we know it.

Advise that everyone should have a full meal before arriving. 

At the meeting, set up a podium so that everyone gets a chance to speak.   As people file in, they are given a card with a number on it.  Provide comfortable chairs.  Reclining chairs would  be best.   Suggest that everyone also bring a pillow for napping and when there is a break in the speaking.   Also suggest that this meeting be on Saturday morning, and suggest to everyone that their tell their wives that they might stay overnight, because this is such an important topic for their amateur radio career, that they must clear their schedule for this meeting. 

Be sure that the business portion of the meeting is as extremely short as possible, under 5 minutes.

After the business portion of the meeting is complete, open the floor to: "How do you install a PL-259?" 

Call out Card #1.   Let that person give his/her version of installing a PL-259.   There is no limit as to how long each person may take to speak about this extremely important topic. 

After Speaker #1 is finished, open the floor to rebuttals.   

After all of the rebuttals are complete, invite Speaker #2 to come up to the podium.   

After Speaker #2 is finished, open the floor to rebuttals. 

......

Depending upon how many radio club members show up, you may have to consider changing the "meeting" to a "conference."  Consider inviting guest speakers to give their thoughts on the subject.   





Logged

If no one is doing it that way, there is a probably a very good reason.
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!