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Author Topic: Hamsphere - do you think it encourages new 'hamsters'?  (Read 1107 times)
HS0ZIB
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Posts: 605




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« on: December 06, 2017, 05:01:53 PM »

Quote
Hamsphere is better. SDR without the radio.

That quote is from the recent 'wet noodle' thread about bad HF conditions.

Years ago, I had a webSDR node in Phuket on DX Tuners.  Then Kelly (who founded DX Tuners) created Hamsphere, and it seems that the Hamsphere community has blossomed.

With some spare time last weekend, I tested out Hamsphere for the first time, locating myself in Myanmar and operating on 40 metres during daylight hours.

Well....... I wasn't really impressed.  I was making 'QSOs' with stations in the UK, Italy, Africa and the USA, all at 5/9 signal.  That's absolutely not realistic of HF propagation on 40 mb during my daylight hours.

I understand that simulating strong signals for all Hamsphere users encourages everyone to make more QSOs, but IMHO it had almost no resemblance to actual HF operating/propagation.  No fun at all.

What say you?
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VA3VF
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Posts: 920




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« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2017, 05:40:10 PM »

Quote
Hamsphere is better. SDR without the radio.

That quote is from the recent 'wet noodle' thread about bad HF conditions.

I understand that simulating strong signals for all Hamsphere users encourages everyone to make more QSOs, but IMHO it had almost no resemblance to actual HF operating/propagation.  No fun at all.

What say you?

If I did not include smileys in my original post, I apologize. I was in no way, shape, or form making a serious suggestion!!!

I would read a book rather than use that during bad propagation periods. Or be here on eHam. Grin
« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 05:50:35 PM by VA3VF » Logged
VK3MEG
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Posts: 809




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« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2017, 01:15:20 AM »

i dont think it does b4 i got my ham call and had a look  never got very far its not radio . if you stuck in a retirement village fair enough i understand personally i would just swl but thats me.
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K4HB
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Posts: 245




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« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2017, 07:26:31 AM »

WOW! What the ----? I was ignorant to what Hamsphere was, thought it must be a new mode or something. So looked it up, and found out it's simulated ham radio over the internet, with simulated QSOs. Not for me, but if anyone enjoys doing this and it helps hone their skills during low sunspot activity, that's fine. But I believe time is better spent going to the low bands and learning Morris Code if you don't know it already. CW on the low bands worked for me during the slump of the last solar cycle. I also did good on 6M Es during this time. I hope if anyone receives a QSL request for internet "QSOs," they'll return it with a note that says something to the effect of "Sri, don't log internet QSOs, pls wrk me on the air for a QSL." Credit for this would be like a pilot getting flying hours for time in a simulator.

As for any "QSO" that involves the internet, it's a big J...... Dang, I'm trying to say the J word but it won't come out. Here's a hint...

« Last Edit: December 07, 2017, 07:28:38 AM by K4HB » Logged

K7KB
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Posts: 684




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« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2017, 07:39:42 AM »

My two cents. Although Hamsphere is not my cup of tea, if by chance it encourages a young person to give it a try, then perhaps later they will want to try the real thing. If it sparks an interest in Amateur Radio then I'm all for it.

John K7KB
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K4HB
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« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2017, 08:47:03 AM »

Quote
My two cents. Although Hamsphere is not my cup of tea, if by chance it encourages a young person to give it a try, then perhaps later they will want to try the real thing. If it sparks an interest in Amateur Radio then I'm all for it.

Good point, guess it's easy to overlook the fact that young folks today are in a whole different world than some of us were during the 50s and 60s. During the 50s, I was making crystal sets and built a Knight Kit Space Spanner that received shortwave. I was hearing hams on the Space Spanner and developing an interest. I was fortunate to meet one of those hams during the early 60s, who became my Elmer. He taught me and prepared me to pass the novice test in 1962. Youngsters today, who are surrounded by the latest technology, probably aren't impressed by primitive communications as I was back then. If Hamsphere can lure newcomers to the hobby, that's fine. I just hope the distinction is made that internet "QSOs" are only for practice or training purposes, and not the real thing.

I hope no one is passing around "QSLs" for these contacts as they are actual radio contacts. Award checkers should be alert for impossible contacts, be it those made by SDR, Hamsphere, remote operation, or anything involving telephone or internet. Heck, I could "work" zones 24 or 26 right now on 6 meters, or those same zones right now at almost 12 noon on 160M.
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VA3VF
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Posts: 920




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« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2017, 09:14:07 AM »

I hope no one is passing around "QSLs" for these contacts as they are actual radio contacts. Award checkers should be alert for impossible contacts, be it those made by SDR, Hamsphere, remote operation, or anything involving telephone or internet.

One way to make it harder, although not impossible, is to accept LoTW confirmations only, specially for 160 and 6M awards. Other awards sponsors would have to devise their own ways.
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LA7DFA
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Posts: 29




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« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2017, 09:34:56 AM »

Would be better to hear from new HAMs coming from Hamsphere, than us old farts wondering if some do...
In Europe many HAMs started using CB, and then moved on to HAM.

I could see Hamsphere being useful for those without radio or decent QTH.  Perhaps also a way to recruit more interest, in the less developed countries.
Contesting on Hamsphere could be interesting, since it could give everyone the same conditions. 
To be honest its not so fair on HF, since your QTH more or less decides who can win.
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VA3VF
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Posts: 920




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« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2017, 09:49:18 AM »

Would be better to hear from new HAMs coming from Hamsphere, than us old farts wondering if some do...

I won't oppose anything that may bring more people into the hobby, specially young ones, but there is some irony in all of this.

Some of you are aware of some of the criticisms leveled at FT8 and its users. Hamsphere is totally fake, fake ether, fake propagation, fake hamradio. It's at best a simulator. Something that would have some value as a tool for training aspiring hams on hamradio best operating practices.

Now, these young and savvy new hams, will likely love FT8, but by then, they will be criticized to no end as not being real hams. Go figure.
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WO7R
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Posts: 2535




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« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2017, 02:47:52 PM »

In my whole hamming life, we have always had killjoy hams who find reasons to crap all over newcomers.

Since the newcomers are in a technical hobby, and not wedded to the sacred "old ways", they inevitably "do it wrong" and have to listen to the killjoys tell them so.

IMO, a lot of hams are licensed today in spite of us, not because of us.

Particularly dreary was the "no code" versus "know code" thing.  The people coming in did not make the new rules, yet many were castigated because they didn't know the code and therefore "weren't real hams."  I really thought that was an unfortunate argument.
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KM4SII
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Posts: 267




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« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2017, 03:41:57 PM »

I've heard of Hamsphere before, but will most likely never use it. I personally prefer the challenges and joys of HF  Wink

Sure, on Hamsphere you can have "QSOs" to anywhere at anytime like on HF, but virtual radio is not the same. There is no challenge, no surprise when you work stations, etc..

I get a rush when I spend days, even weeks trying to work a rare DX station and finally get through. There is nothing like that on virtual radio. It is basically just a phone call...

Maybe I am not a normal youth or maybe I misunderstand how Hamsphere works, but that would not spark an interest in radio for me.  Maybe for others and if so, that is great! It is a cool idea, but that kind of stuff is just not for me...

Just my .02  Smiley
« Last Edit: December 07, 2017, 03:56:13 PM by KM4SII » Logged

KC0W
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Posts: 284




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« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2017, 01:25:55 PM »

 Combine Hamsphere with operating HF via Internet Remote and it goes from being a bad joke to being a really bad joke. Go for the trifecta by operating Internet Remote using a code reader & monitoring Hamsphere all at the same time.

 Long live those who realize REAL amateur radio is; Radio - Coax - Antenna...............My lump of coal for Christmas must be around here somewhere.  

                                                                        
                                                                        Tom KC0W      
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W1VT
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Posts: 2520




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« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2017, 02:39:37 PM »

I remember club meetings in Hawaii where guys would suggest that WAS was harder than DXCC from Hawaii after finding out I had my DXCC award as a teen aged ham.  Of course I'd point out that I had that too!

Zack W1VT
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VE3VEE
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Posts: 1194




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« Reply #13 on: December 08, 2017, 02:46:10 PM »

Hamsphere? Hey, why not? I see nothing wrong with that! And it's related to our hobby! I have much more in common with someone who is into Hamsphere than with someone who is into cooking, knitting, gardening, writing, hiking, fishing, photography, hunting, dancing, birdwatching, sewing, scrapbooking, woodworking, drawing, camping, genealogy, geocatching, scuba diving, stamp collecting, quilting, coin collecting, parachuting, baking, rail transport modelling, singing, and cycling.

Marvin VE3VEE
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VA3VF
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Posts: 920




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« Reply #14 on: December 08, 2017, 02:57:21 PM »

And it's related to our hobby! I have much more in common with someone who is into Hamsphere than with someone who is into cooking, knitting, gardening, writing, hiking, fishing, photography, hunting, dancing, birdwatching, sewing, scrapbooking, woodworking, drawing, camping, genealogy, geocatching, scuba diving, stamp collecting, quilting, coin collecting, parachuting, baking, rail transport modelling, singing, and cycling.


I disagree. Wink

We can make them all have something in common, by referring to them as Ham <insert name>.

Cooking, knitting, gardening, writing, hiking, fishing, photography, hunting, dancing, birdwatching, sewing, scrapbooking, woodworking, drawing, camping, genealogy, geocatching, scuba diving, stamp collecting, quilting, coin collecting, parachuting, baking, rail transport modelling, singing, and cycling, do not use RF, just like Hamsphere. Grin Grin Grin

RF is just a minor inconvenience, I know. Roll Eyes

Just joking. Smiley
« Last Edit: December 08, 2017, 02:59:27 PM by VA3VF » Logged
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