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   Home   Help Search  
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Author Topic: Useful things with Raspberry Pi  (Read 295141 times)
G4HDU
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Posts: 7




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« Reply #15 on: September 29, 2016, 11:19:07 PM »

I use my PI with weewx weather software at Maghull.org.uk and currently incorporating the AS3935 lightning sensor to warn of impending thunderstorms with the ability to isolate the shack if too close.

Another possibility is to use CAT interface and remote control of the rig or a tft LCD display to echo your operating parameters, useful for club or special event stations. With a touch screen and CAT you can move towards an extra touch console for the rig.

Run a mysql (or Maria) database server for logging etc. A PI can easily be used to produce a network attached storage device (with raid) for storing backups away from the house (my nas is in a separate building).

Run a remote controlled sdr receiver located away from all the rfi in an urban environment to give noise free reception or monitoring your transmitted signal.

Just a few thoughts.
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N0YXB
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Posts: 1140




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« Reply #16 on: October 01, 2016, 12:34:55 PM »

I use my PI with weewx weather software at Maghull.org.uk and currently incorporating the AS3935 lightning sensor to warn of impending thunderstorms with the ability to isolate the shack if too close.


That's very cool
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WW7KE
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Posts: 605




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« Reply #17 on: October 01, 2016, 05:39:34 PM »

ive programmed in basic, cbm and ibm. basic stamp i used but i know nothing of these new small board units. id like to see some simple program code so i can see if i can "get it"!. i think i have a mental block with "c".
oh, i also played with pic chips with the Microelectronika stuff from europe,40 and 80 pin pics,fun stuff but used basic and a compiler. i can do basic.

help?! Huh

If you can program in Basic, you can program in Python.  One thing to remember is that indentation is part of the syntax of the language.  Make sure that your text editor has color coded syntax highlighting, and that your tabs are set to 4 spaces, not one tab character.  Do not use Windows Notepad.  It isn't designed for programming in any language.

Python is free/open source software, and available for Windows, MacOS, and all versions of Unix/Linux with the possible exception of Android.  Use your favorite PC to practice on if you like.

https://www.python.org/
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He speaks fluent PSK31...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
W9WQA
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Posts: 277




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« Reply #18 on: October 01, 2016, 06:00:05 PM »

ive programmed in basic, cbm and ibm. basic stamp i used but i know nothing of these new small board units. id like to see some simple program code so i can see if i can "get it"!. i think i have a mental block with "c".
oh, i also played with pic chips with the Microelectronika stuff from europe,40 and 80 pin pics,fun stuff but used basic and a compiler. i can do basic.

help?! Huh

If you can program in Basic, you can program in Python.  One thing to remember is that indentation is part of the syntax of the language.  Make sure that your text editor has color coded syntax highlighting, and that your tabs are set to 4 spaces, not one tab character.  Do not use Windows Notepad.  It isn't designed for programming in any language.

Python is free/open source software, and available for Windows, MacOS, and all versions of Unix/Linux with the possible exception of Android.  Use your favorite PC to practice on if you like.

https://www.python.org/
thanks for the help. ill try to download and give it a try

tom
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AB3TH
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Posts: 194




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« Reply #19 on: October 01, 2016, 06:25:13 PM »

. . . you can program in Python.  . . .

In no particular order, I've had to program in the following languages over the years because somebody thought they were great.  Octal machine code, Several assemblers, Fortran, Basic, APL, C, C++, C#, PL1, Python, dBase, SQL, Java, Pascal and a bunch I've forgotten.  I'm not actually good at any of them.  I would really appreciate it if people wouldn't invent any more languages.
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K6LCS
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Posts: 1995


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« Reply #20 on: October 26, 2016, 06:35:18 PM »

For just under $100, you can make up the exact same Raspberry Pi 3 setups that are currently aboard the International SPace Station.

Raspberry Pi 3 (don't get it from eBay - spent the $36 bucks and get it from trusted Amazon.com vendors), the SENSE HAT, and a camera - under $100.

CHILDREN from Europe held a contest last year which projects would be sent to the ISS, and run by ESA Astronaut Tim Peake. You can duplicate those projects from their Web site ...

https://astro-pi.org/

And they're having another contest right now for European students to see what goes up next for Pi projects aboard the ISS!

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Clint Bradford, K6LCS
http://www.work-sat.com
K7RBW
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Posts: 488




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« Reply #21 on: October 28, 2016, 04:14:52 AM »

I've done a few projects with the Raspberry Pi:

I created a portable web server that made it possible to communicate local status and information to smart phones and tablets--great for a remote command post or similar set up where you need to communicate information to a potentially large, but local, crowd. Used all open-source software. Total cost < $100 and no Internet required to deploy, i.e. it would work in the field and off the grid.

I just finished building a stratux (http://stratux.me) box and now I watch the planes flying past. This configuration works with dedicated iPad software so I can watch them whether I'm flying or sitting at my desk.

I have all the parts to build a Raspberry PI SDR general-purpose receiver, but I haven't had a chance to hook 'em all together in that configuration.

Some kinda fun!
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N6YWU
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Posts: 18




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« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2017, 06:41:12 PM »

I'm using a Raspberry Pi 3 as essentially an adapter between an RTL-SDR USB dongle and my iPad.  The Raspberry Pi is near my antenna feed, and runs a linux port of rtl_tcp to stream raw IQ samples over WiFi.  This allows me to run an SDR receiver app on my iPad in my living room.  I'm writing all my own iOS SDR code in Swift 3.
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KB2FCV
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« Reply #23 on: January 25, 2017, 01:57:43 PM »

I have a few now in the house.

One is watching the sump pit water level and will email/text if it raises past a certain point (indicating a problem). I plan to add a camera to it in order to take / send pics to a second pi located closer to my switch/router/patch panel/UPS that monitors whether there is line voltage. It will then send out a pic (eventually a short time lapse movie) to the phone so I can see if the sump pit is dry or if it is filling up and I need to get home to get the generator plugged in. The second power monitoring pi is now there.. still working on a few bugs with the alerting and power monitoring status but its getting there. I'll then move onto the camera on the sump pit pi

I have a third pi that I've been playing around with monitoring temp and humidity but I haven't gotten too far. I have a sensor that I can run a command to take temp / humidity measurements but that's about all. I don't think the readings are very accurate and it isn't very stable as they tend to change a bit if I keep re-running commmands.

For radio... I want to experiment with a remote receiver that is solar powered and will beam back audio over wifi. The idea is to try a remote 160m receiving antenna & small SDR receiver across the river from my house.

That's what I've been up to with pi stuff. I like to put these little buggers to use as everyday devices doing something reasonably important.
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WB8LZR
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« Reply #24 on: February 09, 2017, 06:50:57 AM »

The Pi2 has enough power for an SDR/Quisk receiver, although my setup hiccups once in a while. Quite usable, though.  I think the SDR app puts the Pi2 right on the edge of its available memory and cpu power limit.  I don't use it for SDR transmitting, but there's another amateur who has build the Pi into a PSK transmitter:

http://www.radiotecnia.es/raspberry-pi-based-psk31-transmitter/

I think it might need some additional attention to ensure the cleanliness of the signal, like substituting an Si570 for the Pi's built in frequency generator, and adding a real good low pass, etc.  But wow - talk about low parts count!

I am thinking about coupling the SDR Pi receiver with a little old-timey standard QRP CW transmitter to make a cheapie Qrp rig though.

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AE5X
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Posts: 1029




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« Reply #25 on: February 09, 2017, 04:46:08 PM »

I am currently using my RPi and a $15 dongle to receive real-time air traffic within a 200-mile radius of my house. Details and photos of the set-up are here:

http://ae5x.blogspot.com/2017/02/real-time-plotting-of-aircraft.html

Also using another RPi from time to time as a WSPR beacon. Those details are here:

http://ae5x.blogspot.com/2017/02/wspring-with-raspberry-pi-step-by-step.html

73,
John AE5X
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N4WCQ
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Posts: 7




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« Reply #26 on: February 21, 2017, 10:14:12 AM »

I use my RPi3 to program the radios in the car.  I did not want to remove the radios to program them so I put the software on the pi and then use the USB cable to connect the radio.  I connect from my desktop to the PI on my internal network and run the software to re-program the radios. It is much easier for me than either removing the radios or taking my laptop to the car.
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WB8LZR
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Posts: 40


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« Reply #27 on: February 22, 2017, 08:28:38 AM »

It seems the things to do with a Pi and ham radio are endless.  I turned mine into a receiver, as mentioned above (by adding a 2x2 inch SDR board to a 2x3 inch minibox clipped to the side of a "homemade" tablet that's powered by a Pi2 and NiMH batteries.  The SDR gets power from a short cable into the tablet (almost no drain on the batteries, really).

I thought about putting the board into the tablet (still on the bucket list to do, but need slightly different enclosure) - really a simple thing to do.

I get shortwave coverage too - so use the Pi to receive weather faxes and weather images from NOAA.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2017, 08:33:44 AM by WB8LZR » Logged
AI8IA
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Posts: 101




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« Reply #28 on: March 03, 2017, 03:14:35 PM »

I am currently using my RPi and a $15 dongle to receive real-time air traffic within a 200-mile radius of my house. Details and photos of the set-up are here:

http://ae5x.blogspot.com/2017/02/real-time-plotting-of-aircraft.html


John AE5X


I did Piaware with an old Pi 2 last year, had so many problems with the wifi dongle on that thing, so I threw in the towel. Well, I have had a Pi 3-b in the box for months (built in wifi) so I made a new Piaware image, loaded it up, and hooked up the SDR to the Jetstream JTB3 that I just installed on my roof last weekend, at the end of 75 feet of LMR-400... didn't expect much, but it's getting tons of data! Hasn't gotten anything super far yet, but I'll leave it on over the weekend and see what happens. https://flightaware.com/adsb/stats/user/djmd808




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AE5X
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Posts: 1029




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« Reply #29 on: March 05, 2017, 06:18:39 AM »

I see that you have a good number of reports in the 150-200nm range but your 144/440 antenna and 75' of feedline are greatly attenuating the 1090 MHz RF getting to your dongle. I pondered the feedline issue as well and ended up just putting everything in my attic.

The antenna is suspended from a rafter at the peak of my roof. A 1090MHz bandpass filter is connected directly to it and the dongle directly to that. No feedline at all. The RPi is also in the attic and is powered from an outlet up there. It has no problem staying connected to my wireless router here in the people part of the house and seems to do better than when I had the antenna mounted externally on my chimney but with 50' of LMR400.

I'll know in a few months if this set-up can survive an attic installation during a Texas summer.

For now:
http://flightaware.com/adsb/stats/user/ae5x

73,
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