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eHam Forums => Boat Anchors => Topic started by: JS6TMW on August 08, 2015, 07:13:20 PM



Title: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: JS6TMW on August 08, 2015, 07:13:20 PM
Avengers 2 was showing on my flight to Narita and it was hard to not look away from the nonstop special effects although it was really giving me a headache. My reward was a 1/2-second shot of an otherwise high-tech console in some operations room, that included a pie-shaped yellow-lighted dial that could have only been an old Hallicrafters SX. Crazy out of place but it some set designer must have thought it was cool-looking, as do we.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: KAPT4560 on August 09, 2015, 02:56:34 AM
 The venerable SX-42 also appears to have accompanied many inter-planetary rocketship voyages back in the 1950's.  ;D
 It was state-of-the-art communications in its day.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: WA2ISE on August 09, 2015, 05:04:33 PM
From "Forbidden Planet"
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/-zy3WE5XOFoU/USFMLmKBf2I/AAAAAAAAFKQ/o8PDE-DXCE8/45.TheKlystrontransmitter_thumb13.jpg?imgmax=800)
(http://www.projectrho.com/public_html/rocket/images/fasterlight/forbiddenPlanet02.jpg)
Some of it looks like bare boatanchors, and a rack of more boatanchor equipment.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: ONAIR on August 09, 2015, 10:33:31 PM
From "Forbidden Planet"
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/-zy3WE5XOFoU/USFMLmKBf2I/AAAAAAAAFKQ/o8PDE-DXCE8/45.TheKlystrontransmitter_thumb13.jpg?imgmax=800)
(http://www.projectrho.com/public_html/rocket/images/fasterlight/forbiddenPlanet02.jpg)
Some of it looks like bare boatanchors, and a rack of more boatanchor equipment.

    Boat anchors in the 22nd century!  ;)


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: G3RZP on August 10, 2015, 07:09:57 AM
Not quite Hollywood (although United Artists bankrolled it) is the James Bond film 'Dr. No'. This starts a KW Electronics 'Vanguard' transmitter, dating from the 50s: 10 - 80m, (some models added 160) AM/CW (although with a drift like Kon Tiki on 10m CW) with a 6146 PA, modulated by push-pull 6L6s. The woman is told to change frequency and adjusts the PA plate tuning - at which point, quite rightly, she is shot! I seem to recall that there's Racal RA17 in there somewhere.

I remember a film from the '70s - 'Our Man Flint' or some such title. That has a Drake TR4 and a Vibroplex key....


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: KD0REQ on August 10, 2015, 09:14:34 AM
M probably had the Racal pop out of a fountain pen....


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: KG6YV on August 10, 2015, 02:50:37 PM
Here is a "classic".... In the movie Manchurian candidate Laurence Harvey goes up in the rafters of the convention center to shoot the candidate (supposedly) with a rifle.  On his right side in this little room is a BC375 transmitter, supposed to be the PA system.  Ha!!!

Its the original movie with Frank Sinatra as the cop...



Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: KE6EE on August 10, 2015, 02:55:49 PM
with a drift like Kon Tiki...

That's surely the best phrase of the day! :D


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: N4NYY on August 10, 2015, 05:41:31 PM
The Waltons used a ham radio to listen to the war communications in WWII. I could not see/remember the model, however.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: KM1H on August 13, 2015, 03:00:09 PM
The Waltons was a 38 Zenith 12S232 12 tube table model which covered the BCB to 18mc; I have the 9 tube 9S232 version in my collection.

Carl


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: KAPT4560 on August 14, 2015, 03:33:55 AM
 I remember the passage in the book: The Sands of Mars by Arthur C. Clarke.
 The astronauts had to boost output of the ship's transceiver by boosting operating voltages. Some of the tubes were short-lived and the spares were used up during the last-ditch, maximum-power transmission.
 Although there were no pictures of the transceiver, you could imagine what it looked like with tubes burning up and being changed in order to keep it running. You could feel the anxiety of the crew.
 Sir Arthur C. Clarke was a master at writing believable and thrilling sci-fi because of his science-based thinking and background.
 I do enjoy the passages in sci-fi books that describe the 'gee-whiz' 1950's era thinking of what future advanced technology would be like.
 The thought that solid-state would only be relegated to simple, low-power circuits and that robust, state-of-the-art vacuum tubes would still be necessary for space travel.  :D


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: WA2ISE on August 14, 2015, 01:03:00 PM
I remember the passage in the book: The Sands of Mars by Arthur C. Clarke.
 The astronauts had to boost output of the ship's transceiver by boosting operating voltages. Some of the tubes were short-lived and the spares were used up during the last-ditch, maximum-power transmission.
 

I would have worked on the antenna instead.  Like a multi-element beam (assuming you know where to point it).  Or a homebrew bigger microwave dish, if applicable. 

In other movies, there were "boatanchors" in "Dr Strangelove".  Inside the B52, the CRM114 discriminitor radio set.
(http://www.certsoft.com/CMax/CRM-114_Kubrick.gif)


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: N4NYY on August 16, 2015, 10:13:17 AM
The Waltons was a 38 Zenith 12S232 12 tube table model which covered the BCB to 18mc; I have the 9 tube 9S232 version in my collection.

Carl


He was transmitting on it! LOL


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: N3QE on August 17, 2015, 09:48:54 AM
I always liked the Eico 720 in the sherriff's office in Andy Griffith :-)

Even better, Ron Howard has the Apollo 11 LEM. "Me and my brothers, we hid up in the rafters, we saw the whole thing!". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9OQwZDTPoU


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: KJ6ZOL on August 18, 2015, 12:01:36 AM
I remember the passage in the book: The Sands of Mars by Arthur C. Clarke.
 The astronauts had to boost output of the ship's transceiver by boosting operating voltages. Some of the tubes were short-lived and the spares were used up during the last-ditch, maximum-power transmission.
 Although there were no pictures of the transceiver, you could imagine what it looked like with tubes burning up and being changed in order to keep it running. You could feel the anxiety of the crew.
 Sir Arthur C. Clarke was a master at writing believable and thrilling sci-fi because of his science-based thinking and background.
 I do enjoy the passages in sci-fi books that describe the 'gee-whiz' 1950's era thinking of what future advanced technology would be like.
 The thought that solid-state would only be relegated to simple, low-power circuits and that robust, state-of-the-art vacuum tubes would still be necessary for space travel.  :D

Hey, we went to the moon using tech that seems laughably primitive today. If you're p'd about not being able to travel to the moon on a Pan Am space plane, blame Nixon, who gutted the space program in the early 70s. The Russians built a shuttle from stolen plans and determined that it was useless. Now the only way we have of getting to the ISS is Russian rockets.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: JS6TMW on August 18, 2015, 03:11:14 AM
Until SpaceX and Virgin get the bugs sorted out.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: KD8MJR on August 21, 2015, 07:36:47 PM
Until SpaceX and Virgin get the bugs sorted out.

I seriously do not know why people get themselves wound up about this kind of thing.
NASA is in down time now while they finish off the next generation of space craft.
The new SLS rocket is nearing completion and is 20% more powerful than a Saturn 5.
The Orion capsule and service module will be able to carry double the crew of any Apollo era craft and be able to go much faster and further.  NASA is not standing still they are just retooling new craft.

73s
Rob


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: KC8MWG on August 23, 2015, 11:24:43 AM
I read somewhere that there was an early episode of "Gilligan's Island" that featured a Hallicrafters S40-B receiver that was being passed off as a transmitter (which, of course, Gilligan proceeded to destroy...)


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: JS6TMW on August 23, 2015, 03:50:57 PM
I read somewhere that there was an early episode of "Gilligan's Island" that featured a Hallicrafters S40-B receiver that was being passed off as a transmitter (which, of course, Gilligan proceeded to destroy...)
A well-deserved fate.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: KC8MWG on August 23, 2015, 04:21:44 PM
I read somewhere that there was an early episode of "Gilligan's Island" that featured a Hallicrafters S40-B receiver that was being passed off as a transmitter (which, of course, Gilligan proceeded to destroy...)
A well-deserved fate.
So what's wrong with the S40-B? Granted it wasn't top-of-the-line in its time; more like a mid-level receiver, for 1950. Not nearly as bad as the S-38 series, though!


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: JS6TMW on August 23, 2015, 07:30:05 PM
I recalled them as just an S-38 with a pretty face, but I now see that they did have an RF stage. No xtal filter though.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: K4PIH on August 25, 2015, 07:30:00 AM
I remember that episode. I had an S-40B and it was a pretty good radio for general SWL.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: KB0XR on August 28, 2015, 07:33:52 AM
I always liked the Eico 720 in the sherriff's office in Andy Griffith :-)

Even better, Ron Howard has the Apollo 11 LEM. "Me and my brothers, we hid up in the rafters, we saw the whole thing!". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9OQwZDTPoU
There's another episode of Andy Griffith where some gypsies are supposed rain makers and Andy finds a Hallicrafters SX 110 that the gypsies are using to get weather reports.  Andy stands there holding the receiver which has neither a speaker nor antenna nor power cord hooked up yet is operational.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: W1BR on August 28, 2015, 07:54:46 AM
The S-40B was also transformer powered, not a hot chassis AC/DC radio.  That added a bit to the cost.

Pete


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: KAPT4560 on August 28, 2015, 12:42:39 PM
 I'll bet that the professor was able to reverse-wire the S-40B receiver and make it into a transmitter.  ;D

 Early hams with just a receiver and little money used turn the audio output tube/stage of the receiver into a switchable QRP transmitter and then listen in on the 1st audio tube with headphones.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: W1BR on August 28, 2015, 01:13:50 PM
As I recall there was at least one AC/DC S-38 variant that used the 50L6 audio stage as a crystal controlled transmitter stage.  I am pretty sure it existed, but I can't find a reference to the model number. Perhaps someone else may be able to fill in the gaps. The radio wasn't that popular, but it still commands serious collector value when it shows on eBay.

Pete


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: KT4AE on August 28, 2015, 02:55:14 PM
Again, not a movie but there was an episode on "Bones" where they had an SB-610 sitting on an office desk being used as a scanner.  I don't remember what they were scanning for, cell phones or what but they got a blip and ran out the door.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: JS6TMW on August 28, 2015, 06:30:05 PM
I dunno guys... turning the audio stage into an RF power oscillator (and then turning it back on receive) sounds very impractical. If you can find references please post. Maybe in Hollywood in WWII POW camp films!

What I do recall about early hams is that they would pinch the output tube(s) from the family broadcast receiver and fire them up in their homebrew transmitter when nobody was using the Crossley. A pair of 45's made a pretty nice pushpull oscillator.

Steve in Okinawa
(I visited Hollywood last month and it was crazy but I didn't see any boat anchors.)


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: K1DA on August 28, 2015, 07:13:31 PM
Nice KMW2  + 30S1 in the General's trailer in Apocalypse Now.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: G3RZP on August 28, 2015, 11:37:37 PM
There was a German war time adaptor to plug into the AF output socket of BC radio to use it as a tx. There's a picture of it in one of the RSGB collections of Technical topics. I seem to remember it was an Abwehr thing.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: KAPT4560 on August 29, 2015, 04:47:40 AM
  There was an old eHam thread that addressed how to go about a makeshift tube transceiver. 

  http://www.eham.net/ehamforum/smf/index.php?topic=42397.0;wap2
 
 The ham I spoke with did the audio output-to-transmitter mod to his S-20R. He got "across the river" with it.  It was low power and it struck me as a novel idea when you didn't have the resources for a proper transmitter.
  There were plenty of single tube oscillator/exciter 'glowbug' projects in the ARRL publications at the time. I built one and I remember how hot it ran when keyed with a plate load, but it remained fairly stable.



Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: W1BR on August 29, 2015, 11:04:37 AM
Found it!!

http://rigreference.com/en/rig/2804-Hallicrafters_SR_75

This a Hallicrafters S-38 that uses the audio tube for both audio, and with some simple changeover circuitry, the same tube serves as a cathode keyed CW transmitter!  The design is very clever... but I'd hate to have the been the Novice who started off with this radio!  It wasn't very popular, and is somewhat rare.

Pete


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: JS6TMW on August 29, 2015, 07:45:10 PM
Well, I'll be durned! Thanks for that...  I'll bet it's rare.

There is a dedicated xtal oscillator/multiplier, but it does indeed use the audio stage as the RF amp. I hope there was a polarized line cord or tha antenna would get squirrely if it's plugged in the wrong way.

Steve


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: K0OD on August 29, 2015, 11:18:56 PM
(http://www.radiomuseum.org/images/radio/hallicrafters_the/sr_75_209220.jpg)

Wow, the SR-75 "transceiver" is new to me. Extremely rare, no doubt. I'm sure some current owners don't even know about its 10 watt transmitting ability. Virtually identical in appearance to  early S-38 models.

Reminds me of the obscure Hammarlund HQ-105TR general coverage receiver (ca 1961) that has a single channel CB transmitter built-in.
http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/commrxvr/hq105tr.html


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: N6OIL on August 30, 2015, 02:10:27 PM
I thought I saw a Kenwood hybrid on the Avengers: Age of Ultron. Can someone fact check that?


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: K4PIH on September 03, 2015, 09:48:14 PM
Here's the Gilligan link for the S40:

gilligansisle.com/radio.html


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: N2SR on September 04, 2015, 05:25:15 AM
In one issue of QST, the previous column writer (K2TQN) of Vintage Radio described being on the set of Paranoia, where they used his old radios as props for scene. 



Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: N2EY on September 04, 2015, 02:31:32 PM
The SR-75 is indeed rare - and with good reason!

The various versions of the S-38 receiver ranged in price from about $40 to $50, depending on model and retailer. The SR-75 cost about $80 during the short time it was made. Which meant you were paying $30 to $40 for a ten-watt crystal-controlled transmitter! There were much better choices, and I suspect most amateurs made them.

73 de Jim, N2EY


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: K0OD on September 04, 2015, 09:59:12 PM
The Hallicrafters SR-75 dispensed with antenna switching by using separate antennas for transmit and receive. There was a 3-conductor terminal strip on the back for the receiver antenna and a single wire on the other side of the radio to feed the transmitting antenna. The transmitter's oscillator and amp tuning controls are on the back of the chassis. A single crystal socket is inside the cabinet. For transmit, it seems that each band required its own manually plugged in coil inside the cabinet.  Ugh!

http://gmcotton.com/ham_radio/misc%20manuals/Hallicrafters/Hallicrafters_SR75%20HF%20Tranciever_Manual.pdf


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: W1BR on September 05, 2015, 06:53:12 AM
It was a kludge from the get go. ;)  I wonder how many Novices gave up ham radio after trying to use that radio on 15 meter CW?

Pete


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: G3RZP on September 05, 2015, 07:01:34 AM
Peter,

More likely
Quote
I wonder how many Novices gave up ham radio after trying to use that radio
?


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: K0OD on September 05, 2015, 07:57:58 AM
The SR-75 is indeed rare - and with good reason! ...
73 de Jim, N2EY

Another reason for the rarity of the SR-75 was that it broke new ground... Sorta. Compare it with Heath's wildly popular AT-1  transmitter that came out in '53. The 35 watt AT-1 had a front panel crystal socket, band switching from the front panel including the new 15-meter band,  grid and plate current metering. Plus it could be upgraded with a Heath VFO and antenna tuner. Cost $29! I guess too that any ham who wanted a cheap bad transmitter in 1950 could just buy a Command Set for under $5.

From QST in 2007. The KWM-1 and its Competition
"Hallicrafters was the first major American manufacturers of ham gear to put a rig resembling a transceiver for HF into mass production. Its SR-75, introduced in late 1950, actually was a modified version of the company's entry-level HF receiver, the S-38B. The SR-75 could put out a few watts of crystal controlled CW on 80 through 10 meters." [not 15-meters]


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: JS6TMW on September 05, 2015, 07:53:06 PM
The SR-75 is indeed rare - and with good reason! ...
73 de Jim, N2EY

From QST in 2007. The KWM-1 and its Competition
"Hallicrafters was the first major American manufacturers of ham gear to put a rig resembling a transceiver for HF into mass production. Its SR-75, introduced in late 1950, actually was a modified version of the company's entry-level HF receiver, the S-38B. The SR-75 could put out a few watts of crystal controlled CW on 80 through 10 meters." [not 15-meters]


I am not an expert on WWII military radios, but I am fairly sure that there was some gear we would recognize as transceivers for VHF and portable use.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: K0OD on September 05, 2015, 08:21:57 PM
"that there was some gear we would recognize as transceivers for VHF and portable use"

Yes, plenty of that, some even in the 1930s, but not for HF.

Here's the article I was referring to regarding the 1957 Collins KWM-1 and other early HF transceivers such as the radical Cosmophones.
http://www.arrl.org/files/file/QST%2520Binaries/obrien0107.pdf


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: JS6TMW on September 05, 2015, 10:50:04 PM
"that there was some gear we would recognize as transceivers for VHF and portable use"

Yes, plenty of that, some even in the 1930s, but not for HF.

Here's the article I was referring to regarding the 1957 Collins KWM-1 and other early HF transceivers such as the radical Cosmophones.
http://www.arrl.org/files/file/QST%2520Binaries/obrien0107.pdf

I should have specified that there were WWII rigs that used shared common components for transmit and receive, not just a tx and an rx in the same box.

Interesting article on some real obscure rigs. But the KWM-1 was a lovely little rig.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: G3RZP on September 05, 2015, 11:24:18 PM
Quote
I should have specified that there were WWII rigs that used shared common components for transmit and receive, not just a tx and an rx in the same box.

HF examples include the New Zealand Army ZC1, the British and Canadian Army 19 set, the British Army WS38 and WS62.....and others, the numbers of which I can't remember.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: VK3DWZ on September 08, 2015, 09:58:43 PM
The late Wes Craven directed a truly dreadful film in the mid-1970's called "The Last House on the Left".  In the scene in the Police Station an old valve Lafayette short-wave receiver is seen briefly.


Title: RE: Boat anchors in Hollywood
Post by: AC7CW on September 09, 2015, 08:28:56 AM
I'll bet that the professor was able to reverse-wire the S-40B receiver and make it into a transmitter.  ;D

 Early hams with just a receiver and little money used turn the audio output tube/stage of the receiver into a switchable QRP transmitter and then listen in on the 1st audio tube with headphones.

I could have used one of those when I was a novice and generating RFI like crazy. "What? I only have a receiver!"