eHam

eHam Forums => Licensing => Topic started by: K2ACB on June 30, 2017, 09:54:14 AM



Title: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: K2ACB on June 30, 2017, 09:54:14 AM
In a previous message I wrote that I remember when the CB craze hit in the early 1970's.I never had a CB license.  Originally CBers were supposed to register their stations with the FCC.  They were limited to 5 watts and certain frequencies on the 11 meter band. However so many people in the 70's got CB licenses and broke the rules by either not registering with the FCc or running a lot more power than 5 watts that for the most part unless there were flagrant violations or CBers were severely interfering with other electronic or radio communications,the FCC left them alone. This was probably due to a combination of factors including lack of personnel to track down these violators except for those that were really doing harm and because of budgetary constraints.

I know that in the 60's before the CB craze the FCC from my personal experience was more vigilant in monitoring and cracking down on radio amateurs who broke the rules. The amateur radio service is only a small part of the FCC's jurisdiction. The FCC also relies on Official Observers from the ARRL to monitor for violations of amateur radio operators. Over the years on maybe two or three occasions I have received either by regular mail or the last one I received by e/mail a notification from an OO that they heard me out of the band. I always replied that this was an error on my part and I would take precautions that this did not happen again. I must say I was glad it was a notice from an OO rather than from the FCC.

I do not operate 80 meters.I have heard that there are some people who operate on that band that constantly use foul language and are very bigoted.These people are very few but some are regulars on 80 meters.  I am far from a prude but I feel that US amateur radio operators should not use foul language over the air nor should they be bigoted over the air.

I know that there are some constitutional lawyers out there who believe complete broadcast freedom of speech should extend to all means of communication in this country and not only pay TV and pay radio channels. I think the courts in this country would differ with that interpretation. A few years back during a live superbowl telecast on the CBS network, , the entertainer Janet Jackson during the entertainment portion at half time had a mishap with her costume  and for a very brief amount of time one of her nipples was exposed. The FCC fined CBS a large sum of money to allow this on live TV even though this was an accident. I think the FCC said they should have had a two second delay to catch this and not allow it on the air.

Thus is the FCC more lax in their enforcement of amateur radio today than they were years ago?

&2-Alan
K2ACB


 




Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: N2EY on June 30, 2017, 10:35:21 AM
I think it started in the 1970s and really got going in the 1980s.

What I saw happen was that, in the late 1960s, 11 meter CB became more and more out-of-FCC's-control. When the 55 mph speed limit was imposed, it just got much worse.

FCC tried to enforce the rules, but they were simply outnumbered. There were literally millions of Americans flagrantly violating the rules by not having licenses, not ID'ing, running power above the legal limit, and more. By the mid-1970s there were "freebanders" operating outside the 11 meter channels, often with old/modified amateur gear, and the FCC was hard pressed to do anything about them - although there were some dramatic raids, arrests and seizures.

Meanwhile, new communications technologies and services were coming online at a rapid pace. (FCC regulates ALL civilian comms, not just radio). But FCC didn't automatically get more money, so they started cutting everything they could. The policy of "get the government off your back", deregulation, etc., meant that amateur radio enforcement went to near-zero.

In the 1960s, FCC actively patrolled the amateur bands, looking for ANY violation of the rules, and sending out all sorts of notices. By the 1980s, they became complaint-driven - they only respond to complaints.

Lack of resources is why we got 10 year licenses and the VEC system - both saved FCC resources. We were, and are, pretty much left to our own devices for the past 35 years.

There's also the fact that, in the past, most FCC rules violations were technical - key clicks and chirp, splatter, out-of-band operation, etc. Nowadays the violations are more "bad behavior", which are much harder to prosecute.

73 de Jim, N2EY


As for 75 meters - the lack of enforcement is the reason.


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: WA2ISE on June 30, 2017, 11:29:38 AM
...
In the 1960s, FCC actively patrolled the amateur bands, looking for ANY violation of the rules, and sending out all sorts of notices. By the 1980s, they became complaint-driven - they only respond to complaints.
...
There's also the fact that, in the past, most FCC rules violations were technical - key clicks and chirp, splatter, out-of-band operation, etc. Nowadays the violations are more "bad behavior", which are much harder to prosecute.


Ham radio equipment got much better over the years, so technical violations now are much rarer today.  Other issues like new hams making procedural errors, ie, lids, mostly are self correcting as the new ham gets experience and learns the customs.  And then there were the hardcore  lids on 14.313 and such that did willful violations. 

Take a look at the NALs that the FCC issues, and you'd find that most of the lids are in other radio services, like broadcasters, taxi companies and such. 


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: ONAIR on June 30, 2017, 03:09:00 PM
The real problem was that way too many people became CBers.  Back in the late '60s through the '80s, you could find as may as 50 CBers within a mile radius, and CB antennas on cars and homes were everywhere!  Auto makers were actually selling factory CB/AM/FM combination radios in their new vehicles!  The FCC was completely overwhelmed, and basically just threw in the towel.  Financial constraints and free speech rulings then hampered the FCC's power to even enforce the ham bands!  The "renegade repeater" in Los Angeles has been flagrantly violating FCC rules for decades, and to this day the FCC has been unable to stop them.  www.BroadCastify.com/listen/feed/14747/web


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: AA4PB on June 30, 2017, 03:54:45 PM
The real problem was that the FCC assigned a short-range communications service to a frequency that at the time often had world wide propagation. They compounded that mistake by thinking that they could just make of a "rule" telling people not to talk long distances. When they started mailing out "pink slips" people just stopped using their FCC assigned call signs, making it far more time consuming to identify them.


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: K1LEM on July 02, 2017, 04:00:18 AM
 The FCC works only on complaints. You can never know if they will act, further LIDS and No codes think they own exclusive rights to a channel. They have no idea, if they are hearing something, then surely, a station they claim is interfering with them must also. Sorry HF doesn't work that way.
You can, if you have the stomach for it, look up Obscene language and failure to ID proven on 7200 by the CB channel master, K9RSY. Just see recordings of RSY that have been posted on Utube.

The issue today, FCC has other things going on and most of the people on the bands have no understanding of what a Rule violation is. They just knee Jerk react if somebody is on a frequency they thought they owned. (Nets..) etc. :)


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: N3DF on July 04, 2017, 12:42:09 PM
The Supreme Court ruled that the FCC had no power to fine CBS over the Janet Jackson incident.


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: K6CPO on July 05, 2017, 03:43:38 PM
The FCC works only on complaints. You can never know if they will act, further LIDS and No codes think they own exclusive rights to a channel. They have no idea, if they are hearing something, then surely, a station they claim is interfering with them must also. Sorry HF doesn't work that way.
You can, if you have the stomach for it, look up Obscene language and failure to ID proven on 7200 by the CB channel master, K9RSY. Just see recordings of RSY that have been posted on Utube.

The issue today, FCC has other things going on and most of the people on the bands have no understanding of what a Rule violation is. They just knee Jerk react if somebody is on a frequency they thought they owned. (Nets..) etc. :)

That's quite the generalization.  That "no codes" (as you call them) think they have exclusive rights to a channel. 

Well, I'm a "no code" having been first licensed in 2011 and I respect other operators use of all the bands.  The only place where I would intervene would be misuse of my club's two repeaters and I feel I have a certain right to do so as the duly elected President of the club.

One of the reason we're having difficulty attracting young people to our hobby is the curmudgeonly attitude of a small percentage of members.


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: W4KVW on July 10, 2017, 08:10:34 AM
The FCC is an Underfunded Toothless Lion.All Roar & very little bite.Been that way for quiet a long time.11 meters is & has been out of control for so long it will never be cleaned up because there is not that much money in the entire Federal Government Budget unless we do away with Welfare & the Libs would start another Civil War before that happened.  :D

Clayton
W4KVW


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: NK7Z on July 10, 2017, 10:37:13 AM
...they own exclusive rights to a channel.
A Channel?


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: SWMAN on July 10, 2017, 12:34:01 PM
I thought a channel was only for TV, CB and rivers only.


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: W9IQ on July 10, 2017, 05:03:15 PM
The FCC actually uses the term channel in part 97. Take a look at the requirements for IDing a station.

- Glenn W9IQ


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: KB9ZB on July 12, 2017, 04:38:52 AM
the term channel is used throughout the FCC rules and regs. The federal agencies all use the term channel, remember other than Amateur Radio service everyone else uses channels !!  We also have "channels" look at the 60 meter allocations
Ron
KB9ZB


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: AC8ND on July 13, 2017, 11:30:20 AM
The FCC works only on complaints. You can never know if they will act, further LIDS and No codes think they own exclusive rights to a channel. They have no idea, if they are hearing something, then surely, a station they claim is interfering with them must also. Sorry HF doesn't work that way.
You can, if you have the stomach for it, look up Obscene language and failure to ID proven on 7200 by the CB channel master, K9RSY. Just see recordings of RSY that have been posted on Utube.

The issue today, FCC has other things going on and most of the people on the bands have no understanding of what a Rule violation is. They just knee Jerk react if somebody is on a frequency they thought they owned. (Nets..) etc. :)

I'm getting really sick of this "no code" BS.
I had no choice.
You have a choice so leave the hobby why don't you.


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: K6CPO on July 13, 2017, 11:51:35 AM
The FCC works only on complaints. You can never know if they will act, further LIDS and No codes think they own exclusive rights to a channel. They have no idea, if they are hearing something, then surely, a station they claim is interfering with them must also. Sorry HF doesn't work that way.
You can, if you have the stomach for it, look up Obscene language and failure to ID proven on 7200 by the CB channel master, K9RSY. Just see recordings of RSY that have been posted on Utube.

The issue today, FCC has other things going on and most of the people on the bands have no understanding of what a Rule violation is. They just knee Jerk react if somebody is on a frequency they thought they owned. (Nets..) etc. :)

I'm getting really sick of this "no code" BS.
I had no choice.
You have a choice so leave the hobby why don't you.

Blaming other for their own bad behavior...


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: ARCSPARK on July 16, 2017, 11:22:01 AM
The FCC works only on complaints. You can never know if they will act, further LIDS and No codes think they own exclusive rights to a channel. They have no idea, if they are hearing something, then surely, a station they claim is interfering with them must also. Sorry HF doesn't work that way.
You can, if you have the stomach for it, look up Obscene language and failure to ID proven on 7200 by the CB channel master, K9RSY. Just see recordings of RSY that have been posted on Utube.

The issue today, FCC has other things going on and most of the people on the bands have no understanding of what a Rule violation is. They just knee Jerk react if somebody is on a frequency they thought they owned. (Nets..) etc. :)
CERTIFIED MAIL – RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED
January 5, 2017
Mr. Gary E. Davis
215 Applebark Lane
Inman, South Carolina
Re: WARNING NOTICE
Amateur Radio License K1LEM
EB-FIELDNER-17-00023290
Dear Mr. Davis:
On October 21, 25 and 26 and December 10, 2016, you were heard by staff at the
Commission’s High Frequency Direction Finding Center (HFDF), using long range direction
finding techniques, playing music in order to deliberately interfere with the ongoing QSOs of
other amateurs while operating on the frequency of 7200 kHz.
The Commission employee used direction finding equipment and confirmed the
transmissions were coming from your location. The employee recorded the offending
transmissions and provided undersigned counsel with recordings of the incident in question.
Should you desire a copy of the recording, one will be made available to you.
Your operation as described above is contrary to the basis and purpose of the amateur
radio service as set out in Section 97.1 and is a violation of Section 97.101(d) of the
Commission’s rules.1 Section 97.101(d) states that


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: K9MHZ on July 18, 2017, 12:49:04 PM
^^^^Yessir, one of those inconvenient truth episodes.^^^^

Funny how the most boorish have the most skeletons to hide.  What a putz.


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: K9MHZ on July 19, 2017, 03:17:38 AM
A beauty from K1LEM in the Misc Forum.....
"I think by reading these forums you can see what limited minds these very old men have. Or do they just wish to be contrary. There is nothing wrong with a contrarian, but these old boys have limited eye sight and apparently intelligence left.
The post for HR is hilly  billy never went to school CBers with nocode and old men who are humorless and quite frankly over the hill.
 Just laugh it off I guess !"

Apparently, the FCC didn't "just laugh it off" OM.    


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: KC9NRN on July 19, 2017, 12:00:18 PM
The FCC works only on complaints. You can never know if they will act, further LIDS and No codes think they own exclusive rights to a channel. They have no idea, if they are hearing something, then surely, a station they claim is interfering with them must also. Sorry HF doesn't work that way.
You can, if you have the stomach for it, look up Obscene language and failure to ID proven on 7200 by the CB channel master, K9RSY. Just see recordings of RSY that have been posted on Utube.

The issue today, FCC has other things going on and most of the people on the bands have no understanding of what a Rule violation is. They just knee Jerk react if somebody is on a frequency they thought they owned. (Nets..) etc. :)

Incredible assumptions made by an actual LID, I'm a no code Tech, who would never claim interference unless it could be proven, I would never play music to interfere with others. The only people who claim to own a frequency are K1MAN, VE7KFM and a few other loons who are Extra's from before nocode times. I think you assume a lot about what others know or don't know, but it sure is clear you have some issues understanding rules yourself. Maybe before casting aspersions you get over yourself first. 


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: W9ZIM on July 20, 2017, 12:14:16 PM
The "renegade repeater" in Los Angeles has been flagrantly violating FCC rules for decades, and to this day the FCC has been unable to stop them.  www.BroadCastify.com/listen/feed/14747/web

I don't know if the FCC can't stop them so much as they don't want to stop them.  I've read the theory that by giving the miscreants there own place to hang out, it makes it less likely they'll cause trouble elsewhere, and it seems to be working for the most part since the on-air insanity in Los Angeles is largely restricted to that one repeater.  Can you imagine how these individuals might retaliate if the FCC took their clubhouse away?


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: ND6M on July 20, 2017, 01:06:41 PM
[quote author=KC9NRN link=topic=115595.msg1009633#msg1009633 ...edit...
Incredible assumptions made... would never claim interference unless it could be proven,... it sure is clear you have some issues understanding rules yourself.... 
[/quote]

Well, (this is not an assumption), it is clear that you really don't understand Part 97.
 
there is no regulation against "interference",.... interference happens, and  in and of itself is not illegal.

 you do need to prove intention, both deliberate AND malicious .


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: KC9NRN on July 21, 2017, 11:12:37 AM
[quote author=KC9NRN link=topic=115595.msg1009633#msg1009633 ...edit...
Incredible assumptions made... would never claim interference unless it could be proven,... it sure is clear you have some issues understanding rules yourself....  
Quote

Well, (this is not an assumption), it is clear that you really don't understand Part 97.
 
there is no regulation against "interference",.... interference happens, and  in and of itself is not illegal.

 you do need to prove intention, both deliberate AND malicious .

Excellent point, I stand corrected.


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: K4KYV on August 04, 2017, 01:28:00 PM
The FCC went after the Janet Jackson incident because of the network's and TV stations' deep pockets.  Would the FCC have gone after them if it had been Justin's nipple instead of Janet's on camera for a quarter-second?


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: ONAIR on August 05, 2017, 01:14:18 PM
The "renegade repeater" in Los Angeles has been flagrantly violating FCC rules for decades, and to this day the FCC has been unable to stop them.  www.BroadCastify.com/listen/feed/14747/web

I don't know if the FCC can't stop them so much as they don't want to stop them.  I've read the theory that by giving the miscreants there own place to hang out, it makes it less likely they'll cause trouble elsewhere, and it seems to be working for the most part since the on-air insanity in Los Angeles is largely restricted to that one repeater.  Can you imagine how these individuals might retaliate if the FCC took their clubhouse away?
  Well if the FCC came in with the full force of the government and took away licenses, tracked down offenders and hit them with significant fines and penalties, the issue would soon come to an end.  But that would take significant manpower, time and money, and if anything the government is trying its best to to cut costs today.  I would assume they are focused on bigger priorities, like tackling the opioid epidemic or the murder rate in Chicago.


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: PLANKEYE on September 04, 2017, 03:33:07 PM
I really don't see a reason to test for the license.  OK maybe keep the test in place but forget about enforcement.  That is 15 dollars not enforcement of rules but just the entry fee.  I think this is kinda what it is now.  I may be wrong.   


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: PLANKEYE on September 04, 2017, 07:26:15 PM
Not to be a down here but K1LEM has been one of many people I have heard on the air that really makes me wonder if I should get on the air.  I don't know if it's him on this forum or on the air, either way it's too bad that people act like that.   


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: N0YXB on September 06, 2017, 07:51:07 AM
His antics are well known to many and he is certainly not indicative of the average ham radio operator. You shouldn't judge the entire group by the actions of a few sociopaths. The good news is that you've found where they congregate and now you can avoid these idiots.


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: ND6M on September 06, 2017, 02:29:18 PM
... (edit) either way it's too bad that people act like that.   

Perhaps, it's not an act.


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: PLANKEYE on September 09, 2017, 12:33:46 PM
I'm not sure. 


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: PLANKEYE on September 14, 2017, 01:55:25 PM
You all in this Hobby put up with a lot of crazy.  Not sure why.  Anyway good luck. 


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: KC4ZGP on September 19, 2017, 06:27:21 AM

The F.C.C. is a government agency. One must have standards before they can loosen them.

Kraus



Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: KC8MWG on November 12, 2017, 07:43:52 AM
Here's an idea - hams policing their own! Track down the lids and "freebanders" (DF ing, etc.), give them ONE warning, then if the bad behavior continues, sneak in at night and stick a straight pin through their coax cable... ;)


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: N2EY on November 22, 2017, 01:18:40 PM
Here's an idea - hams policing their own! Track down the lids and "freebanders" (DF ing, etc.), give them ONE warning, then if the bad behavior continues, sneak in at night and stick a straight pin through their coax cable... ;)

Really?

Let's think what that entails.....

First, you'd need to figure out exactly who the bad apple is. That means DFing the person while they are on the air, to make sure you've got the right person. (People can falsely ID, not ID at all, use recordings of other people's voices, etc.).

Second, you'd have to deliver the warning. How would you do that, exactly? Face to face? By US mail? Drop something on their doorstep or in their mailbox?

Third.....the pin-through-the-coax thing involves trespassing and vandalism. What if the bad apple has a dog? Or a security camera? Or a gun? You might find yourself in DEEP trouble....

Fourth.....what if you blame the wrong person?

Think about it. It's 2017......


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: N4UE on November 22, 2017, 02:27:44 PM
James, +1

Things are a LOT different today, than they were 'back then'...

ron
N4UE


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: N0XAX on December 05, 2017, 10:10:11 PM

The F.C.C. is a government agency. One must have standards before they can loosen them.

Kraus



Heir Kraus, the FCC is like the Third Reich. We know the Third Reich was totally defeated in WWII. So it is as the FCC has been neutralized. We now need the Fourth Reich that is reborn from the ashes. The new FCC will be TAFCC (The Armed Federal Communications Commission) They have the authority to kick down perpetrator's doors and seize equipment and to sanction the inhabitants of the building they have entered. I feel in 5 years of this regulatory method, most of the miscreants will be removed from amateur service and we can return to civil operations. This is a standard I could support and adhere to.


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: N9AOP on December 06, 2017, 09:17:54 AM
We tend to feed the misfits.  That's why they become so fat.  Years ago there was a Polish guy that owned a local FM station.  At 6PM every night he played an hour of polka music.  When he got complainers he told them that their radio had two knobs--ON/OFF and the tuner knob.  His suggestion was to use either one until 7PM.
Art


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: N0XAX on December 06, 2017, 04:16:08 PM
We tend to feed the misfits.  That's why they become so fat.  Years ago there was a Polish guy that owned a local FM station.  At 6PM every night he played an hour of polka music.  When he got complainers he told them that their radio had two knobs--ON/OFF and the tuner knob.  His suggestion was to use either one until 7PM.
Art

What happened Art? To many bullies take your lunch money when you were in grade school? And now you just "accept" this type of behavior in all walks of life? I'd rather take an ass whippin' or vice a versa. That's what's so sad about this country today, people just acquiesce to all of the deviants and their bad behavior. I say poke them in the eye with a sharp stick.


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: N9AOP on December 07, 2017, 10:40:52 AM
XAX, that will not change anything unless a majority of people start thinking like you.  With the overabundance of liberals around, that is not gonna happen.
Art


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: N0XAX on December 07, 2017, 11:04:03 AM
XAX, that will not change anything unless a majority of people start thinking like you.  With the overabundance of liberals around, that is not gonna happen.
Art

Liberals always spoil the party, don't they? We do agree on this. Maybe we conservatives need to become the majority? 73


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: K9MHZ on December 08, 2017, 01:19:44 AM
Here's an idea - hams policing their own! Track down the lids and "freebanders" (DF ing, etc.), give them ONE warning, then if the bad behavior continues, sneak in at night and stick a straight pin through their coax cable... ;)

You've GOT to be kidding.  And who do you think the cop will take to jail, OM?  

99% of people anywhere, including a judge, won't care about you acting on your sanctimony.  


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: N2EY on December 08, 2017, 06:32:57 AM
We tend to feed the misfits.  That's why they become so fat.  Years ago there was a Polish guy that owned a local FM station.  At 6PM every night he played an hour of polka music.  When he got complainers he told them that their radio had two knobs--ON/OFF and the tuner knob.  His suggestion was to use either one until 7PM.
Art

What happened Art? To many bullies take your lunch money when you were in grade school? And now you just "accept" this type of behavior in all walks of life? I'd rather take an ass whippin' or vice a versa. That's what's so sad about this country today, people just acquiesce to all of the deviants and their bad behavior. I say poke them in the eye with a sharp stick.

Let me get this straight.....

What you're saying is that if someone behaves badly on the amateur bands, and doesn't respond to others telling them to change their ways, that YOU would trespass on their property and commit vandalism.

What will you do if arrested for trespass and vandalism?

What will you do if the property owner "stands his ground" with a firearm or other weapon?

It's not about "liberals" or "conservatives". It's about the LAW.



Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: N0XAX on December 10, 2017, 10:35:46 PM
N2EY Said:

Let me get this straight.....

What you're saying is that if someone behaves badly on the amateur bands, and doesn't respond to others telling them to change their ways, that YOU would trespass on their property and commit vandalism.

What will you do if arrested for trespass and vandalism?

What will you do if the property owner "stands his ground" with a firearm or other weapon?

It's not about "liberals" or "conservatives". It's about the Law.




James, it is about conservatives and liberals! Conservatives obey the law, and liberals do not! Liberals think the law does not apply to them.


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: N9AOP on December 11, 2017, 10:10:25 AM
Piercing or cutting the offenders coax is known as the 'Chicago fix'.
Art


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: WH6WJ on December 14, 2017, 08:30:21 PM
When technology changes so will the FCC.  Follow the money trail and amateur radio is not where it's at.


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: N0XAX on December 15, 2017, 10:56:36 PM
When technology changes so will the FCC.  Follow the money trail and amateur radio is not where it's at.

I could not agree more Sterling. Case in point. Look at the NOUO's and NAL's issued by the fcc for pirate radio operators. They are quite aggressive when the pirates are on the fm commercial band (88-108mhz) but could care less about the pirates on the international HF bands 6.950 etc. The money is in the commercial fm band! Don't take my word for it. Go to the fcc's website and tell me when the last NAL was levied against an HF pirate (excluding ham radio bands). You hit the nail on the head sir! They could care less about the amateur bands! What enforcement standards?


Title: RE: When did the FCC Loosen their Enforcement Standards?
Post by: MM0IMC on December 17, 2017, 12:50:20 PM
Your FCC is still better than our Ofcom here in the UK! >:(  They've not busted anyone in years for amateur radio or CB radio abuse, from a recent FOI request revealed! :o