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eHam Forums => CW => Topic started by: VK5EEE on December 07, 2017, 02:36:07 AM



Title: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: VK5EEE on December 07, 2017, 02:36:07 AM
Please post links to what you consider may be useful guides to abbreviations, or any you know of, that could help any newcomer to CW?
If you have any on a site of your own, please kindly also post that.


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: VK5EEE on December 07, 2017, 02:40:27 AM
Answering my own question first, this seems to be quite a good one: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morse_code_abbreviations


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: VK4FFAB on December 07, 2017, 02:53:23 AM
ROTFLMAO YMMV ICYMI QQ TLDR;


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: OZ8AGB on December 07, 2017, 03:54:41 AM
This one seems to be quite comprehensive (except I could not find EN):
http://ac6v.com/morseaids.htm#CW (http://ac6v.com/morseaids.htm#CW)


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: VK5EEE on December 07, 2017, 06:00:01 AM
You won't find EN as it's not an abbreviation it's a stylish "R"  :)


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: N4IAG on December 07, 2017, 07:05:54 AM
Answering my own question first, this seems to be quite a good one: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morse_code_abbreviations

99 means "get lost!" - I've not that one before, but I have heard other colorful abbreviations basically meaning the same thing. :D


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: GW3OQK on December 07, 2017, 07:15:31 AM
How about including
MX Merry Christmas
HH Happy Holidays!
DWN Down

Besides 99 I've never heard of NX, ZX, and NM except for nautical miles. KTS for Knots.
161
Andrew


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: N4OI on December 07, 2017, 11:12:06 AM
Answering my own question first, this seems to be quite a good one: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morse_code_abbreviations

Glad to see I am in compliance with a few that I had been wondering about - e.g., TNX (instead of THX), but apparently I am out-of-step in many others.  For example, I use the prosign BT when thinking or getting ready to change subjects, and report my QTH as "NR Charlotte, NC, NC."  (Obviously Charlotte is not a number...)  So, am I a bad person in need of repentance, or is it OK to keep my questionable habits?

73   ::)


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: DL8OV on December 07, 2017, 12:01:58 PM
Andrew, please be careful about sending HH, especially at the end of a QSO. I have heard from at least two sources that during the 1930's and 1940's German stations ended a contact with 'HH' but in this case it meant Heil Hitler.

Can anyone confirm this?

Peter DL8OV


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: DJ1YFK on December 07, 2017, 12:26:00 PM
Andrew, please be careful about sending HH, especially at the end of a QSO. I have heard from at least two sources that during the 1930's and 1940's German stations ended a contact with 'HH' but in this case it meant Heil Hitler.

Can anyone confirm this?

In the book "Signalbuch für den Kurzwellenverkehr" (Fuchs-Fasching, Vienna, 1936 edition), the CW abbreviation "hhi" is listed with the translation "Deutscher Gruß" (literally "German Salute"). I have heard the same about "HH", but not seen anything in print about it, from the time before 1945. Some people also claim that the abbreviation 55, which seems to be used predominantly in Germany also stems from this.

73
Fabian


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: WA2ONH on December 07, 2017, 12:30:05 PM
Many items on this site...

Learning the Morse Code
http://www.9h1mrl.org/ukrae/arc_cd/extra/morse/index.htm

SEE: Chapter 27 - Abbreviations
http://www.9h1mrl.org/ukrae/arc_cd/extra/morse/html/c27.htm





Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: W3TTT on December 07, 2017, 01:37:18 PM
Q-Codes  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q_code (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q_code)

I had never heard of "99" before.  Wasn't she Maxwell Smart's partner? :D


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: K0UA on December 07, 2017, 03:54:37 PM
Q-Codes  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q_code (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q_code)

I had never heard of "99" before.  Wasn't she Maxwell Smart's partner? :D

She absolutely was.  And Barbara Feldon wasn't  hard to look at or listen to either.


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: VK5EEE on December 07, 2017, 07:11:06 PM
Re the excellent list of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morse_code_abbreviations and there's also very helpful information after the list, such as QSO format etc.

I've never heard used CX (but instead CONDX or CONDS), nor NX, VX (except in French for "old man"), ZX. I have heard of 99 and also heard it rarely used (when was in G land in 80s). Nor have I heard of WTC Whats the craic? (Irish Language: [Conas atá tú?] and still don't know what that means or if it really belongs in this list  :)

One Russian DSW made it into the list, perhaps SPB, ZA, and TOW should be added too  :D

Regards HHI, HH, 55. I also heard this about HH but no idea if it was a rumour or fact, morphed from the earlier HHI (which I had not heard about), and I have of coruse never heard HH used for any purpose. 55, originating in Germany and used in neighbouring countries, meant "viele punkte" (many dots/points) but held to mean "Viel Erfolg" (much success) so wishing you success.

For 55 I really do not think there is anything but wild theories that it is an attempt to revive the HH (assuming that HH was used as it would seem reasonable to assume it was to some degree). Maybe a rumour could be started in future that TT really is a sign for Trump Tower or Trump Trump, and R is a secret signal between Republicans or even that CQ developed into a tribute to Colonel Qadhafi.


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: GW3OQK on December 08, 2017, 02:30:27 AM
Friends, there's no chance of me using HH or Happy Holidays even if some people take offence at being wished Merry Christmas. Perhaps some put up their holiday tree and make a holiday cake.
I am very well aware of signallers sometimes signing off with HH, 73 years ago. I read about a British operator who regularly worked a clandestine station in France. She noticed a change in the Fist, suspected the agent had been captured and the set was being operated by a German. Signing off she sent HH and got an immediate HH back.

72 is used by QRP operators instead of 73, as another abbreviation.

In that Wikipedia list I also see
"44 Hand shake, half of 88. Often used in Flora and Fauna connections, HH in CW"

All the best
Andrew


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: VK5EEE on December 08, 2017, 04:35:06 AM
Indeed Andrew, won't be using Happy Holidays that's for sure. Thankfully it is NOT on the Wikipedia list.


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: KQ4MM on December 08, 2017, 06:33:11 AM
Interesting thread ... begs the question for me as a new OP anyway .. are there some standard ways to say Merry Christmas??  MX  = Merry Christmas, was suggested, but I've yet to hear anything other than Happy Holidays to U and URS so far in my QSOs .. I send Merry Christmas to U and URS my self...

77 es VRY 73 es Merry Christmas .. de KQ4MM

Brian


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: VK5EEE on December 08, 2017, 08:19:10 PM
GM/GA Brian,

I guess MX would be understood. But I don't believe that anyone should wish Eid Mubarak, Merry Christmas, or any other religious holiday over amateur radio as it has always been three forbidden things over amateur radio: religion, politics and business.

This is what makes us cross all borders, allowed us to communicate at the height of the cold war from behind both sides of the iron curtain, and even today for PR China and RO China (Taiwan) as well as Ukraine and Russia, Israel and Iran, to communicate freely.

It is also what may make it eventually possible for P5 to receive licenses for their citizens safe in the knowledge that business won't be discussed, nor politics nor religion, and this is not a one side thing. It protects Americans from hearing about socialism and Juche Idea.

I don't think radio amateurs would like to hear about such things on air, nor to receive greetings that are from one religion or another without even knowing if the other amateur is from that same religion or not.

As a universal language of its own, CW, unites us all in addition to the above "verboten" aspects of Amateur Radio, we all learned this language and share a common bond and camaraderie irrespective of our political and religious beliefs or our business or social status.

So let us all avoid any religious greetings on air, and holidays too are not universal. On the radio we don't have holidays anyway, we are either on the air or not on any given day  :)

73 es 77


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: GW3OQK on December 09, 2017, 03:24:36 AM
Does HNY meet your approval Lou?
77, Andrew


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: VK5EEE on December 09, 2017, 06:28:26 AM
73 Andrew

 :) Well, it's not my new year, and it's never happy, and I HATE it, but I can't stop the world wishing yet another HNY... it's not religious, political nor business, so of course it is allowed in amateur radio. But it's not truly universal though the world now follows that calendar. Chinese New Year for example is different, New Year in Muslim countries is different again, etc. Most hams do exchange HNY. I like to skip it personally. I like to skip the entire New Year if I could, and rewind 50 years :D


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: KD8IIC on December 09, 2017, 11:23:14 AM
  I too think living 50yrs ago was better but only best if I was that much younger again.
  Realisticaly though, many of us, myself included, would be quite dead now if not for our modern healthcare
  technologies!
  Time Marches ON and still waits for no man! Seize Your Day!


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: VK5EEE on December 09, 2017, 03:58:26 PM
So true OM Lane. One wonders... a lot of the illnesses today were not so common long ago (cancer, obesity, heart diseases etc all caused by modern diet and lifestyle) so we would not have gotten sick with those things back then, but there were other things that there are now cures for which back then there wasn't. However, I'd bet that overall, we were better off back then. Less afraid of pain and more resilient. I know I'd have been very wealthy because fast accurate telegraphists would earn the most money and were sought after in all sorts of institutions when it was the sole means of long distance communication. But, no doubt, I'd either be dead by now or very, very old!

Your "Seize Your Day" comment is very, very important. For years I was unable to do that. Thanks for the great reminder. Must try to do it every day!


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: KD8IIC on December 09, 2017, 09:00:16 PM
  A railroad friend of mine had a grandfather in the employ of Western Union bk when it was still vy landline telegraphy.
  He regularly would take the family to Florida during the winter months for a bit of vacation since all he needed to do
  was show up at the Western Union office wher they stayed and go to work while family stayed in warm comfort.


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: VK5EEE on December 09, 2017, 10:14:21 PM
Good 'ole days!


Title: RE: Guides to common CW abbreviations
Post by: KQ4MM on December 10, 2017, 05:40:24 AM
KD8IIC

My grandfather was a freight agent for a railroad in Mississippi from the 30s till he retired in the 50's. He worked at several small town depots across central MS for the Columbus to Greenwood Railroad. As part of his job, being at small depots, he was also the telegraph operator ( I understand it was not uncommon at small locations since the traffic as light). I sure wish he was still alive today, or that as child I was interested in CW and could have him tell me stories. My uncle has his old vibroplex original, but he has dementia and does not remember me when I visit so likely will never see it. I did find a good deal on a 1941 Original that I purchased, in his honor I plan to learn to use it ( I'm a long way from that today) ...

Good memories ...

Lou .. Per advice, I'll keep my abbreviations to the standards but will say 77 es 73 to you .. KQ4MM