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eHam Forums => Misc => Topic started by: G3RZP on May 24, 2018, 11:32:15 AM



Title: Cold 807s
Post by: G3RZP on May 24, 2018, 11:32:15 AM
Does anyone know when and where and why the term 'cold 807' got applied to a cold beer?

It is a very 'USA term'.....Shows affection for a VERY popular transmitting tube, though!


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: N8YX on May 24, 2018, 11:49:37 AM
Perhaps related to tube envelope color?


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: WZ7U on May 24, 2018, 12:37:12 PM
Ask Otis, the resident drunk.  He would know


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: N0MKC on May 24, 2018, 01:56:36 PM
My guess is that an 807 tube roughly (very roughly) resembles a beer bottle (of days past) in shape & size...


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: KC2QYM on May 24, 2018, 02:52:20 PM
Some geeky ham expression used by ship board radio operators during WWII who were bottled up for hours seeking some escape with a cold brew. They were probably Yanks cause Brits don't like cold beer...perhaps because refrigeration was a standard in the US while in Britain it was a luxury.


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: WZ7U on May 24, 2018, 03:26:19 PM
perhaps because refrigeration was a standard in the US while in Britain it was a luxury.

Like dental care?  ;)


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: W7ASA on May 24, 2018, 08:44:46 PM
I wish that I had more information, but when I asked that in 1970'ish as a lad, I was told that it's because the 807 is a large glass 'bottle' with a cap on it,

More (fun) specifications here >  http://www.qsl.net/kb7rgg/radio/807/807specs.html (http://www.qsl.net/kb7rgg/radio/807/807specs.html)

I do remember a slang term (perhaps local) of calling larger power and/or rectifier tubes which produced a notable glow; "fire bottles".

73 from Idaho - USA

Ray


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: K0UA on May 24, 2018, 09:35:00 PM
From Wikipedia:

"Many hams found multiple paralleled 807s a cheaper alternative to a single larger valve, such as a single 813, as many military surplus 807s became available cheaply after World War II. In Australia 807s are affectionately referred to as "stubbies" because they are almost as ubiquitous as that common Australian beer container."


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: K8AXW on May 24, 2018, 10:35:38 PM
From what I remember from decades ago, the answer by MKC is right on the money.


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: G3RZP on May 25, 2018, 04:27:25 AM
I ask because at Hamvention last weekend, Dave, WJ2O, gave away some beer glasses with a nice picture of an RCA 807 on one side and an exhortation to have a cold 807 on the other!

The term is not too applicable in the UK, where a pint is 20 fluid ounces, not a mean 16!

KC2QYM,

Quote
They were probably Yanks cause Brits don't like cold beer...

That's because our beers have taste and so don't have to be refrigerated to get the taste out of them! But remember why there is IPA.....


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: VK6HP on May 25, 2018, 05:54:24 AM
In Australia I've frequently heard the term "gassy" (but never "cold") 807 for a bottle of beer.

But all our beer is cold, for obvious reasons.  

73, Peter


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: N8YX on May 25, 2018, 07:59:17 AM
...But remember why there is IPA.....
Because hop-farming subsidies are a thing?


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: W7ASA on May 25, 2018, 07:18:12 PM
RZP de ASA BT

"That's because our beers have taste ..."

HA! too true Speckled Hen -vs- that yellow water from Golden, Colorado = no contest, which is why I homebrew (not just for radios, anymore ;-)

73 de Ray
A Bloke in Exile...


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: G3RZP on May 26, 2018, 02:07:09 AM
IPA (India Pale Ale) was brewed with a high alcohol and hop content so that it would keep on the lengthy sea voyage to India round the Cape of Good Hope. It was originally intended for the troops in India in the 18th century, and only became popular in the UK after a shipwreck on the Goodwin Sands off Kent in the early 1800s when some cases of it came ashore.

'ASA, have you tried 'Arrogant Bastard' from Stone's North county San Diego brewery? My San Diego colleagues always said it was named after me! But I found it reasonable....


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: KG4NEL on June 01, 2018, 10:57:49 AM
I ask because at Hamvention last weekend, Dave, WJ2O, gave away some beer glasses with a nice picture of an RCA 807 on one side and an exhortation to have a cold 807 on the other!

The term is not too applicable in the UK, where a pint is 20 fluid ounces, not a mean 16!

KC2QYM,

Quote
They were probably Yanks cause Brits don't like cold beer...

That's because our beers have taste and so don't have to be refrigerated to get the taste out of them! But remember why there is IPA.....

The only good thing to come out of colonialism?  :P


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: N0MKC on June 01, 2018, 05:01:29 PM
<snip>

That's because our beers have taste and so don't have to be refrigerated to get the taste out of them! But remember why there is IPA.....

There's a saying popular among vintage British car & motorcycle enthusiasts over here: "Why do the British drink warm beer?  Lucas refrigerators."

(I've paid my Lucas dues by way of a 70's era Triumph Trident...)


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: KB2WIG on June 02, 2018, 08:54:00 AM


Are the Brit oz's the same as the US oz's ???? ??

klc


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: KB4QAA on June 02, 2018, 10:46:01 AM


Are the Brit oz's the same as the US oz's ???? ??

klc
Liquid ounces are the same.  Pint, Quart and Gallon are different, however.  Imperial vs. "English" systems.


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: G3RZP on June 03, 2018, 02:19:55 AM
The UK pint is 20 fluid ounces: the gallon is 8 pints and thus 160 fluid ounces. The quart - a measure rarely used in the UK these days - is 2 pints i.e. 40 fluid ounces. A gill ( pronounced 'jill') is 1/4 of a pint: that's a measure used mainly for spirits such whisky, gin, rum etc., and a standard 'shot' is 1/5 of a gill in England and Wales but 1/4 of a gill in Scotland.


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: KB2WIG on June 03, 2018, 03:45:20 PM


So I guess its better to go drinking in Scotland.

klc


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: WZ7U on June 03, 2018, 04:13:46 PM
Seems like a long way to go just to fudge around with the measurements...


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: G3RZP on June 04, 2018, 01:03:37 AM
But Scotland has a much lower blood alcohol limit for driving than England or Wales.  I'm told you hit it with 1 pint of 3% beer.

Quote
Seems like a long way to go just to fudge around with the measurements...

Prior to the French revolution and the imposition of the metric system (based, incidentally, on an inaccurate measurement of the earth's diameter), there were a lot of measurements that were generally approximately the same throughout Europe, although the names varied. They all had the same basis - practicality. A furlong (1/8 of a mile) is about the maximum length of furrow the average horse could plough before needing a rest. The acre was the amount of land one man with one horse could plough in a day. A 'stone' (14 pounds)was just that - a rock weighing 14 pounds. Even the depth of the sea was measured in units of around 6 feet (one fathom) in various countries.

For a basically agrarian economy, it worked pretty well. Once manufacturing industry developed beyond making a machine in situ to effectively factory manufacture, more standardisation was needed. At Crofton Beam Engines, on the Kennet and Avon Canal, the Boulton and Watt engine built in 1812 needs a large number of wrenches because the nuts are not all of the same size, and even the threads vary between items of almost the same size. No adjustable wrenches - they came much later, invented by a Swede.


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: K4KYV on July 22, 2018, 10:53:15 AM
Some geeky ham expression used by ship board radio operators during WWII who were bottled up for hours seeking some escape with a cold brew. They were probably Yanks cause Brits don't like cold beer...perhaps because refrigeration was a standard in the US while in Britain it was a luxury.

US beer is traditionally served ice cold to hide its bland tastelessness. Beer has been around a lot longer than refrigeration.

With the recent explosion in popularity of microbreweries, US beer is now world class if you avoid slop like Budweiser, Bud Lite and their ilk.


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: N9AOP on July 22, 2018, 10:58:33 AM
Microbreweries are getting like fast food joints--here today, gone tomorrow and replaced by a different one.
Art


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: WW7KE on July 22, 2018, 11:16:25 AM
Microbreweries are getting like fast food joints--here today, gone tomorrow and replaced by a different one.
Art

Or, like Goose Island in Chicago and Four Peaks in Phoenix, they get bought out by Anheuser-Bush-InBev.  Some of those "craft beers" are no longer owned and/or produced by microbreweries.  AB-Inbev, to their credit, has kept the breweries it bought open, and hasn't turned those great beers into Bud Light, at least so far.


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: G3RZP on July 23, 2018, 12:00:05 PM
A Californian friend always refers to it as 'Buttwiper'............


Title: RE: Cold 807s
Post by: K5LXP on July 24, 2018, 03:39:08 AM

There are a many a fine brewpub/microbrews out there now and it's encouraging to see that industry burgeon as it has in the last couple decades.  But I also see a shift in taste, in the form of "strange brew" that has many and varied adjuncts.  While technically I guess it's beer, the only familiar ingredient is water.  And now IPA isn't just a type, it's a contest to see just how much synthesized hop extract you can add before you start corroding the bottle cap.  Fans of dunkel beer like me who favor more malt based variants like nut browns, porters and scottish ales are often out of luck.  There's a few microbrews around here with 20+ listings on the freshly-made menu, 3/4's of them are horrid IPA's and the rest are the fru-fru fruit or coffee beers.  No doubt they are making what is popular, but it sure ain't popular with me.  The nearby national retail emporium advertises 1100 beers or some fantastic claim, last time I went in there they only had 3 kinds of scottish ales but hundreds of types of IPA's and rice beer swill.  Guess I'll have to start homebrewing again...

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM