eHam

eHam Forums => Youth => Topic started by: KB9CFH on December 13, 2011, 06:38:13 PM



Title: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: KB9CFH on December 13, 2011, 06:38:13 PM
CwCom by MRX software is a program that lets a user send morse code from computer to computer. Would be useful for unlicensed students to practice on, and also for classes and situations that don't allow radios and antennas.
Super Aldis 3 is a training program that works like the flashlights with the code button. The program doesn't have much in the way of a help file but you can import text files and if you have some patience, you may be able to get it to work from computer to computer if you have IP address.
Morse Cat 2 is a training program that can generate its own lessons or will import text files. Good for learning sets and then working into random sending and words.
Winmorse 2 is a program that takes text files and converts them into morse code audio files. Good for taking short conversations and turning them into sound.



Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: ONAIR on December 14, 2011, 12:25:57 PM
I remember as a kid I had a pair of Walkie Talkies which had built in code practice oscillators and a list of Morse code characters right on the units!  I had lots of fun learning the letters with my friend down the street.  It would be nice if they had something like that today for the kids!


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: K5MF on December 27, 2011, 09:20:01 PM
I remember as a kid I had a pair of Walkie Talkies which had built in code practice oscillators and a list of Morse code characters right on the units!  I had lots of fun learning the letters with my friend down the street.  It would be nice if they had something like that today for the kids!

Ask and you shall receive.

http://youtu.be/1kdmTu8MCio

There really is no excuse for anyone wanting to learn code.  The problem is not the availability of programs to get it done, but motivating kids to want to do it.  I have a sign on the wall of my classroom that reads, "It is not a shame not to know, but it is a shame not wanting to know."  My biggest issue is getting the kids motivated.  Now I am talking in generalities here.  I have a good number of awesome kiddos who do what they are suppose to do and really enjoy learning new things.  For them natural curiosity is no problem.  Unfortunately a good number of others just come to school to get away from home and to socialize.  Oh well, we do what we can do.

Happy New Year to all.

Tom
AE5QB


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: N5RWJ on December 28, 2011, 03:54:23 PM
I think the only way to get new hams involved in CW , is to add a voice interface, just like PSK/31 operators some time use.
It would be Morse code sent, letting operators cope it by ear,keyboard or machine. Note: it seems that most PSX/31 operators are now using prearranged type messages for the entire QSO, very very dull ,and killing off its popularity.


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: ONAIR on December 29, 2011, 01:43:45 PM
I remember as a kid I had a pair of Walkie Talkies which had built in code practice oscillators and a list of Morse code characters right on the units!  I had lots of fun learning the letters with my friend down the street.  It would be nice if they had something like that today for the kids!

Ask and you shall receive.

http://youtu.be/1kdmTu8MCio

There really is no excuse for anyone wanting to learn code.  The problem is not the availability of programs to get it done, but motivating kids to want to do it.  I have a sign on the wall of my classroom that reads, "It is not a shame not to know, but it is a shame not wanting to know."  My biggest issue is getting the kids motivated.  Now I am talking in generalities here.  I have a good number of awesome kiddos who do what they are suppose to do and really enjoy learning new things.  For them natural curiosity is no problem.  Unfortunately a good number of others just come to school to get away from home and to socialize.  Oh well, we do what we can do.

Happy New Year to all.

Tom
AE5QB
   Do you really want to get them interested in radio (IMHO)?  Pick up a few old CB radios on Ebay.  As a homework assignment, lend them out to the kids who live close to each other, and tell them to try to communicate with each other from their homes using a 9 foot piece of wire, and then to report their results back to class.  (You might want to set up a CB at your QTH to communicate with them as well)  I think if they can just experience the magic of radio first hand, they will be hooked!  (Happened to a lot of us that way.)  :)


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: K3WEC on January 18, 2012, 09:50:09 PM
I remember as a kid I had a pair of Walkie Talkies which had built in code practice oscillators and a list of Morse code characters right on the units!  I had lots of fun learning the letters with my friend down the street.  It would be nice if they had something like that today for the kids!

Yes!  I had Archer (RS) walkie talkies with the morse buttons - lots of fun.  I think those things were 49MHz.   I remember them ranging a few houses down.


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: K5MF on January 19, 2012, 05:54:27 PM
A few houses down?  Mine were so bad that we had to pick up the phone and tell our buddies to turn on their talkies and go outside so we could hear each other.  The ironic thing is that we could yell across the yards to each other - "Can you hear me now!"  What was the point - Having fun!  We thought we were high tech and really cool - like James  Bond or remember "The Men from UNCLE?"  If we had only trademarked that phrase we could probably be rich now.  How much power did those walkie talkies put out?


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: ONAIR on January 21, 2012, 01:34:56 AM
A few houses down?  Mine were so bad that we had to pick up the phone and tell our buddies to turn on their talkies and go outside so we could hear each other.  The ironic thing is that we could yell across the yards to each other - "Can you hear me now!"  What was the point - Having fun!  We thought we were high tech and really cool - like James  Bond or remember "The Men from UNCLE?"  If we had only trademarked that phrase we could probably be rich now.  How much power did those walkie talkies put out?
  Mine were 100 milliwatts, and I think the crystals were for CH 14 on the CB band.  We got pretty good range, especially when we went to a high floor or on a rooftop.  I remember chatting with another WT about 6 blocks away when the channel was quiet.  After that, and after hearing all the other kids in the area chatting on their 5 Watt CBs, I just had to get one!  Then, like so many of us, the next place up from CB was Ham radio.


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: K3WEC on January 22, 2012, 05:56:39 PM
A few houses down?  Mine were so bad that we had to pick up the phone and tell our buddies to turn on their talkies and go outside so we could hear each other.  The ironic thing is that we could yell across the yards to each other - "Can you hear me now!"  What was the point - Having fun!  We thought we were high tech and really cool - like James  Bond or remember "The Men from UNCLE?"  If we had only trademarked that phrase we could probably be rich now.  How much power did those walkie talkies put out?

Yep, I definitely meant outside range.   I have no idea how much power they had, but I'm guessing just about nothing.  No volume control on mine so you couldn't go stealth.  I remember going through those red Radio Shack 9V batteries like they were water.  I had a Radio Shack "Battery Club" card.   This was in the early 80's.   


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: ONAIR on January 22, 2012, 06:52:24 PM
A few houses down?  Mine were so bad that we had to pick up the phone and tell our buddies to turn on their talkies and go outside so we could hear each other.  The ironic thing is that we could yell across the yards to each other - "Can you hear me now!"  What was the point - Having fun!  We thought we were high tech and really cool - like James  Bond or remember "The Men from UNCLE?"  If we had only trademarked that phrase we could probably be rich now.  How much power did those walkie talkies put out?

Yep, I definitely meant outside range.   I have no idea how much power they had, but I'm guessing just about nothing.  No volume control on mine so you couldn't go stealth.  I remember going through those red Radio Shack 9V batteries like they were water.  I had a Radio Shack "Battery Club" card.   This was in the early 80's.   
    I had that wonderful Radio Shack "9 Volt Battery Eliminator"!  A slight hum, but hardly noticeable.  Had the WT set up as a base station, and constantly experimented with antennas that I would clip onto the WT's telescoping whip!  I'll never forget the thrill when I made that first long distance "DX" contact, a whopping 5 blocks away! :)


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: K3WEC on January 23, 2012, 02:49:07 PM
Hey, I'm sure that 5 block contact was long path.......


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: ONAIR on January 29, 2012, 11:24:39 AM
Hey, I'm sure that 5 block contact was long path.......
  To tell you the truth, I always wondered if my signal was being reflected somewhat.  I remember it would jump up and down whenever the elevated trains rolled by a few blocks away!  :)


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: W5TTW on May 08, 2012, 01:15:22 PM
We thought we were high tech and really cool - like James  Bond
Those days were fun, kids today have more technology at their fingertips than James Bond ever had.  (And better weapons, too.)  Why would they want to play with CW when they can be Luke Skywalker in a role playing game on their computer? 

Times changed, we didn't.  No big deal.  Its the way of things. 


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: N3HEE on August 26, 2013, 07:42:02 AM
Create a CW interface to a cool game that would give them SUPER powers.  They WILL learn the code then!!  ;)


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: K7KBN on September 15, 2013, 04:40:33 PM
I remember as a kid I had a pair of Walkie Talkies which had built in code practice oscillators and a list of Morse code characters right on the units!  I had lots of fun learning the letters with my friend down the street.  It would be nice if they had something like that today for the kids!

Ask and you shall receive.

http://youtu.be/1kdmTu8MCio

There really is no excuse for anyone wanting to learn code.  The problem is not the availability of programs to get it done, but motivating kids to want to do it.  I have a sign on the wall of my classroom that reads, "It is not a shame not to know, but it is a shame not wanting to know."  My biggest issue is getting the kids motivated.  Now I am talking in generalities here.  I have a good number of awesome kiddos who do what they are suppose to do and really enjoy learning new things.  For them natural curiosity is no problem.  Unfortunately a good number of others just come to school to get away from home and to socialize.  Oh well, we do what we can do.

Happy New Year to all.

Tom
AE5QB
  Last year I was eavesdropping on a couple fifth-grade boys in one of the classes where I help out three days a week as a volunteer.  Their little conversation consisted only of whispered "dits" and "dahs" at about 5WPM.  I broke in and asked them  (in like manner)  to please see me after class.  They're in their last year at Esquire Hills Elementary this year, and both licensed Generals.  And they both run CW with excellent fists.


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: W1JKA on September 16, 2013, 05:18:41 AM
   I still believe the best program for future young student hams learning morse code is to get the local scout leader to re introduce the old merit badge that required knowing morse code and signal flag. It worked out very well for many of us.


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: K7KBN on September 16, 2013, 07:30:56 AM
I second that!  My Assistant Scoutmaster, back in the mid-1950s was a retired Navy Master Chief Quartermaster:  flashing light, flaghoist, and semaphore, PLUS CW.  My original troop (#88, Las Vegas NV) could have taken over a watch section on a Navy ship and run the entire system on the unclassified side.

This guy, Master Chief Howard, was my Elmer.


Title: RE: Under utilized morse code programs for unlicensed amateur radio students.
Post by: KB9CFH on May 10, 2014, 11:37:53 PM
CwCom (CW Communicator) by MRX software is a program that lets a user send morse code from computer to computer. Would be useful for unlicensed students to practice on, and also for classes and situations that don't allow radios and antennas . It also has NEWS-BOTS and word practice for training. You can make random contacts around the world with this program.

Super Aldis 3 is a training program that works like the flashlights with the code button. The program doesn't have much in the way of a help file but you can import text files and if you have some patience, it does work from computer to computer if you have IP address.(static address)
 If you are going to be on a sailboat or a ship and need communications other than a radio this is a good program to practice with.
 
Morse Cat 2 is a training program that can generate its own lessons or will import text files. Good for learning sets and then working into random sending and words. If you break the 1000 most used words in the English language into smaller chunks you can generate random word practice. Good beginning training and good random training along with crypto style practice.   BEGINNERS TO ADVANCED

Winmorse 2 is a program that takes text files and converts them into morse code audio files. Good for taking short conversations and turning them into sound.
It generates audio wave files that can be converted into MP3 files and used with MP3 players for practice.  You can take a text file from the older code test generators and turn it into audio files. It can also be used with a DRABBLE generator to create files. If you keep the text short you can create a play list of practice files and use the shuffle option of the MP3 player to listen to just like your music.

Over the air practice is still the best, BUT, if you're stuck and can't get an antenna up  or a radio someplace these might help keep your ear in tune.