eHam

eHam Forums => Boat Anchors => Topic started by: KB4QAA on December 08, 2013, 11:00:24 AM



Title: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: KB4QAA on December 08, 2013, 11:00:24 AM
The Boat Anchor market as I see it:
-Non-technical guys:  Looking for a decent radio in working condition at a moderate price.   They want somebody else to have already repaired and cleaned things up.  Are not particular about original finish, new parts or minor mods.

-Technicians and Historical guys:  Looking for mostly unmolested radios that can be restored to near original operating condition.  Would rather have a dirty grimy radio with original dust,  original finish and parts than have an ignorant seller damage things by cleaning with wrong methods and solutions.  Don't do any cleaning beyond dusting the case with a soft dry cloth.

-Experimenters and Hi-Fi guys:  Looking for radios with main components esp. transformers, variable caps, coils, dials, they can tinker with.  Cosmetics and operating condition are secondary.

-Nostalgists, Purists, Collectors:  Looking for particular radios in particular condition and will pay top dollar for "exactly" what they want.  Unpredictable and uncommon.  Don't do anything to the radio beyond dusting with a soft, dry cloth.

The best way to gauge the market:  Check  Ebay sales and completed sales, eHam, QRZed, QTH. 

Warning: Boat Anchor aficionados  are a romantic and friendly bunch.  They don't care for flippers who are out to make a fast buck or who shade the truth about radio condition and who don't at least appreciate the radios and past eras.

Warning #2:  Don't plug any radio into the wall and turn it on unless it has previously been demonstrated to you in working condition. Doing so with unrestored radios can destroy expensive and difficult/impossible to find components like transformers, coils and tubes! 
 

[split from other topic, bill]


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: KB1WSY on December 08, 2013, 12:19:28 PM
Trying to fit myself into any of these categories and failed.

What I do is buy junk-condition BAs (mainly test equipment) at low prices. I favor ones that were originally kits, or at least, available in kit version. Often I will buy two of the same model, to make sure that I have one "complete" set. Then, I dismantle them almost completely -- and clean up the "unique" parts (the cabinet, dials, chassis, check out the transformers and so forth) and repaint what needs to be repainted. I make sure to obtain a mint copy of the original construction manual and schematic -- I'm particular about using the original manual and not a download from the Internet. Then I rebuild the entire thing from scratch. Occasionally I will "leave something alone" because dismantling it is asking for trouble (rotary switch assemblies are an obvious candidate; tuned circuit front ends another).

My final aim is to *use* the equipment for its intended purpose. I've started modestly, with a Heathkit VOM, an Eico VTVM, and an Eico signal generator, all of whom are now in as-new condition. I have a couple of broken Eico oscilloscopes that I will be dismantling in order to construct a "composite" working one.

I have a BC-453 that was in poor condition and is in the process of being cleaned and modified; it will be connected to a homebrew, crystal-controlled ham bands converter.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: G3RZP on December 08, 2013, 01:07:58 PM
Troubles with Boat Anchors:

1. You've bought it at a reasonable price. You've restored it, it works, now do you have a use for it other than very occasionally?

2. Having got that far, do you really want to let it go, even at 250% profit?

I do have a load of boat anchor era test gear, and that works and, when I get time, gets used. But collecting boat anchors can be addictive.....


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: KB4QAA on December 08, 2013, 03:21:09 PM
KB1WSY,
I think you clearly fall into my "Technicians and Historical Guys" group!


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: KB4QAA on December 08, 2013, 03:26:53 PM
Troubles with Boat Anchors:

1. You've bought it at a reasonable price. You've restored it, it works, now do you have a use for it other than very occasionally?

2. Having got that far, do you really want to let it go, even at 250% profit?

I do have a load of boat anchor era test gear, and that works and, when I get time, gets used. But collecting boat anchors can be addictive.....
Ahem, well yes.  This will be addressed in a future article "Pathologies of Boat Anchor Aficionados".

This leads to the question "Who has a Boat Anchor collecting problem?" a question not unlike "Who has a drinking problem?"  The answer is "Someone who drinks more than you do".    

Therefore based on my own experience anyone who has fewer than 31 Boat Anchors does not have a collecting problem!  :)  


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: HFCRUSR on December 08, 2013, 04:05:20 PM
You forgot to mention the hardcore HF DXer who wants to use the boatanchor for its intended purpose, which is exactly what I bought my SX-88 for way back in 1988, long before I had a clue about its significance. I didn't learn of all that until I got a computer in 2007 and started researching.
I use mine at least 3 times a week because it makes MW DXing and utilities FUN! They are a blast to run and I bet a ton of boatanchor guys out there agree :)


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: K0OD on December 08, 2013, 04:10:18 PM
You forgot to mention the hardcore HF DXer who wants to use the boatanchor for its intended purpose, which is exactly what I bought my SX-88 for way back in 1988, long before I had a clue about its significance. I didn't learn of all that until I got a computer in 2007 and started researching.
I use mine at least 3 times a week because it makes MW DXing and utilities FUN! They are a blast to run and I bet a ton of boatanchor guys out there agree :)

Not everyone agrees
(http://antiqueradio.org/art/halli0914.jpg)


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: HFCRUSR on December 08, 2013, 04:19:48 PM
You LOVE that pic don't ya? :D


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: W1JKA on December 08, 2013, 05:07:42 PM
I'll give $2.00 for the rake.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: HFCRUSR on December 08, 2013, 05:18:31 PM
I'll give $2.00 for the rake.

lame. I get ya. I wasn't expecting mean-spirited crap like this, but I should have.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: KB4QAA on December 08, 2013, 05:30:17 PM
"Dozens of aficionados are holding their chests in pain and gasping for breath..."


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: HFCRUSR on December 08, 2013, 05:32:48 PM
"Dozens of aficionados are holding their chests in pain and gasping for breath..."
meaning what?


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: HFCRUSR on December 08, 2013, 05:36:38 PM
ok let me put a direct question to you that should get a direct answer:
tell me what I said in my first post here that should elicit negative responses like these? I'm trying to understand where this is coming from.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: KB4QAA on December 08, 2013, 06:07:00 PM
ok let me put a direct question to you that should get a direct answer:
tell me what I said in my first post here that should elicit negative responses like these? I'm trying to understand where this is coming from.
Umm, where did you get the idea ANYONE is making negative replies?

I see a lighthearted thread, where everyone is laughing and contributing!  

Your phraseology about using "HF DXing" has left me scratching my head until I realized you were referring to SWL, shortwave listening (where I started out with a Halli S-38D hand-me-down on the floor during a Kansas winter).

Cheers, bill


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: KB4QAA on December 08, 2013, 06:12:14 PM
explaining the joke.....

Imagine all the hams out there dreaming of owning the rare SX-88 and having heart attacks when they see one being left out for the garbagemen!

The Henny Youngman version:

"Take my SX-88.  Please, take it!"


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: HFCRUSR on December 08, 2013, 06:23:11 PM
Well since nothing of the context of my first response to your opinions was responded to, instead comes a photo of my beloved boatanchor in the trash heap, and the subsequent reply was that the busted up rake was worth $2 more than the radio...I have to admit that IS pretty funny and made me smile-but I was beginning to feel the jokes are on me. Dammit I want to talk boatanchors man!
Like I said and meant to convey, I USE this radio regularly, and it is a blast.
I own an r71a and an r75 too. Neither of these radios have ever gotten little snide jabs like this but this radio does. What  am I left to assume?



Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: HFCRUSR on December 08, 2013, 06:25:04 PM
explaining the joke.....

Imagine all the hams out there dreaming of owning the rare SX-88 and having heart attacks when they see one being left out for the garbagemen!

The Henny Youngman version:

"Take my SX-88.  Please, take it!"

sorry to have not taken it the way you meant.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: K0OD on December 08, 2013, 09:13:34 PM
With any radio but an SX88 that pic wouldn't have been so hilarious.

And provocative, too. If the photo were real, what would be the backstory???

We know that a significant percentage of SX-88s can't be accounted for. XYL involvement? Alien radio abductions? Maybe they're in that murky Oklahoma lake with the 3 teens who disappeared in 1970.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: HFCRUSR on December 08, 2013, 09:23:09 PM
Yeah but you're wearing it out and what does it have to do with this thread's topic? Stop being jealous Jeff-grow up.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: G3RZP on December 08, 2013, 11:52:52 PM
If you count test gear as well, leaving out relatively modern stuff like a Bird Thruline, I'm up to 33. But that includes some quite valuable to collectors stuff, such as a WW2 A Mk III spy set in original suitcase and an MCR1 WW2 portable RX with all its coils - and I don't know if either of them work now.

The HP141 spectrum analyser definitely counts as boat anchor...on weight alone!


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: K5RT on December 09, 2013, 09:23:43 AM
The Boat Anchor market as I see it:
-Non-technical guys:  Looking for a decent radio in working condition at a moderate price.   They want somebody else to have already repaired and cleaned things up.  Are not particular about original finish, new parts or minor mods.

-Technicians and Historical guys:  Looking for mostly unmolested radios that can be restored to near original operating condition.  Would rather have a dirty grimy radio with original dust,  original finish and parts than have an ignorant seller damage things by cleaning with wrong methods and solutions.  Don't do any cleaning beyond dusting the case with a soft dry cloth.

-Experimenters and Hi-Fi guys:  Looking for radios with main components esp. transformers, variable caps, coils, dials, they can tinker with.  Cosmetics and operating condition are secondary.

-Nostalgists, Purists, Collectors:  Looking for particular radios in particular condition and will pay top dollar for "exactly" what they want.  Unpredictable and uncommon.  Don't do anything to the radio beyond dusting with a soft, dry cloth.

The best way to gauge the market:  Check  Ebay sales and completed sales, eHam, QRZed, QTH. 

Warning: Boat Anchor aficionados  are a romantic and friendly bunch.  They don't care for flippers who are out to make a fast buck or who shade the truth about radio condition and who don't at least appreciate the radios and past eras.

Warning #2:  Don't plug any radio into the wall and turn it on unless it has previously been demonstrated to you in working condition. Doing so with unrestored radios can destroy expensive and difficult/impossible to find components like transformers, coils and tubes! 
 

[split from other topic, bill]


You forgot one category. I'm seeing a lot of newcomers to the hobby who think they need to own a boat anchor in order to be accepted. Sadly, a lot of these folks need Elmering before jumping into the boat anchor part of the hobby. I've noticed a lot of newcomers who have little or no electronics knowledge, trying to repair or use tube equipment with little success.

Yes, boat anchors are a great way to learn electronics, but IMO, the newcomers need to be more concerned about getting on the air and developing Operating skills first.

One other thought. I foresee boat anchor prices dropping over the next 10 years or so (along with the ham population). Boat anchors are a part of Amateur Radio history, but they weren't a consumer item that was part of Americana, their collectible value dropping. Boat Anchors will become a very small niche market as the guys who are reliving their childhood dreams moving into assisted care facilities and such.

Sorry for a gloomy view of the future, but I'm just calling it as I see it.

Paul


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: AA4HA on December 09, 2013, 09:51:05 AM
One other thought. I foresee boat anchor prices dropping over the next 10 years or so (along with the ham population). Boat anchors are a part of Amateur Radio history, but they weren't a consumer item that was part of Americana, their collectible value dropping. Boat Anchors will become a very small niche market as the guys who are reliving their childhood dreams moving into assisted care facilities and such.

Everyone thinks their generation is particularly unique for holding on to tradition. I am still decades away from the assisted care facility but I have an affection for the warm glow of tubes. There are generations younger than me that also are lured into this particular sideline of the hobby.

With so many people parting-out radios on eBay there are the clever ones who are stockpiling pieces and parts to keep their stuff glowing. Certainly there are radios that will hit the trash-heap when we die but how many of our children are going to take our estates and run them through the eBay marketplace and realize that a radio can sell  for $500-$1500. If you want to do your part then find someone to Elmer/mentor so the joy is passed along and make some sort of contingency plans on where your collection is going when you take that dirt-nap.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: N2DTS on December 09, 2013, 10:10:11 AM
I got into ham radio in the 70's, after CB, which used to be a LOT different...
Started on CW with a brand new hw7 I got from Heathkit over in Philadelphia, then moved up to an HW-101, then did a little voice, but found AM, and started doing that with $10.00 DX-100's, $250.00 30K-1 (SN 9), $400.00 kws-1, $50.00 32V3's, etc.
Used to buy rigs just for parts to play with.

It was all junk mostly, the 30K-1 was good (as are the 32V rigs) but I went home brew, and sold off all the old stuff years ago, for very fair prices, not collector prices.
I have no use for poor performing equipment, and old trouble prone poor performing equipment is not what I want to play with, you ruin resale value if you make it better.

Funny, but on AM, the old stuff worked better then the new stuff does, except for sdr receivers, which is why some guys want the old stuff, but for ssb, even a cheap modern rig is worlds better then the best (kwm2a?) made back then.

The old stuff is good if you want to play with electronics, modern stuff is risky to work on.

I enjoy AM because people talk about radio, how to build them, fix them, improve them, and talking to someone on a Harvey Wells is more interesting then talking about an Icom or other plastic box you plug in and talk into.
Listening on the bands at night, ssb seems to be only politics, guns, jamming, and medical problems...and maybe a bit about how big their amplifier is.



Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: N4NYY on December 09, 2013, 10:24:44 AM
Don't forget the "Flipper". Tries to make a quick buck of a non-working radio. For example, will go to an estate sale and spend good money on an untested and likely not working radio. Then goes on ebay and claim that they do not know nothing about it and does not know how to test it.

To which I always ask, "If you know nothing about it or do not know how to test it, then why did you by it and spend good money?"

They never like that question.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: KB4QAA on December 09, 2013, 02:05:44 PM
Don't forget the "Flipper".
Re-read my post, "Warning"


-People who buy BA's because of high prices are called "Speculators".  :)



Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: N4NYY on December 09, 2013, 02:12:28 PM
Don't forget the "Flipper".
Re-read my post, "Warning"


-People who buy BA's because of high prices are called "Speculators".  :)



Oh yeah. I love it though, when you ask them why they spent good money on a product that they cannot test and know nothing about.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: N2EY on December 10, 2013, 07:06:10 AM
Add "the misguided newcomer/moneysaver". This is the person who has gotten the idea that they can pick up a 30-50 year old rig and put it on the air without a real understanding of just how different such rigs can be from current ones, how to repair them, or what they really need.

I have known far too many hams who bought an older HF SSB transceiver and tried to use it on CW without a narrow filter, AGC off, or RIT, and had a very hard time of it. Or those who bought an older rig that "just needed a little work - a tube or something" and found themselves with a useless piece of junk, because they had neither the time, knowledge or tools to fix it.

Often it is as simple as not having certain concepts. Many hams today have no concept of "warmup time", "zero beating", "tuning up without destroying", etc. I have encountered far too many hams who think that the power rating on a pre-1983 ham rig is the RF OUTPUT rating, rather than the DC INPUT rating! The results are often tragic - imagine what happens to, say, a DX-60 when someone tries to get 90 watts of RF out of a rig meant for 90 watts maximum DC input....it's not pretty.

This ISN'T their fault!


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: KC9VZB on December 10, 2013, 10:01:55 AM
Another group:preppers  The reason I gave my wife for buying an all tube radio and then another was after the emp pulse the solid state rig ain't gona work.But seriously,  I really enjoy trouble shooting more than rag chewing.I got a spark of life out of drake tr3 after figuring every 330k resistor was open.To me its the journey not the destination.I'll probably will use to make a few check ins on am and shelf it.Tr4 is on the way . 


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: AA4HA on December 10, 2013, 10:32:44 AM
Add "the misguided newcomer/moneysaver". This is the person who has gotten the idea that they can pick up a 30-50 year old rig and put it on the air without a real understanding of just how different such rigs can be from current ones, how to repair them, or what they really need............
...... Or those who bought an older rig that "just needed a little work - a tube or something" and found themselves with a useless piece of junk, because they had neither the time, knowledge or tools to fix it.
And that's the real shame. My father (SK) made do with a VTVM, an old oscilloscope and a Heathkit tube tester. The voltages may be higher but the principles are pretty much the same between tubes and transistors. His electronics skills were not great, his soldering was not that good (that was my job) but he was careful, methodical and patient. If it took him a week to put his station back together he would do it. There were no instant rewards, no jumping on eham or the zed to cry for help, no complicated modeling programs for antennas.
Are these skills beyond modern hams? Well, they are not taught any more but then again the amateurs of the 60's and 70's frequently did not have an electronics technical background unless they served in such a role in the military. The backyard hams did a good job of muddling by for a long time. It is just about how you apply yourself and what your expectations are.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: G3RZP on December 10, 2013, 10:35:54 AM
30 years ago, my father bought an FT102, and went SK 6 months later - no connection. That FT102 has been heavily modified by me, is my main HF rig, has the matching remote VFO and speaker, and offers receive RF performance that is more than adequate in terms of IMD, phase noise, sensitivity and selectivity. It isn't light and has a tube PA.

a. Does that count as a boat anchor?

b. If the answer to a)  is Yes, which of the categories do I fall into?


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: KB4QAA on December 10, 2013, 11:15:00 AM
No I don't consider the FT-102, or TS-520/530 as BA's.  They are transistorized Hybrids.   [EDIT:  My second rig was a used TS-530, and I still have it.  I carried it around the world on my navy patrol deployments.]

The tube finals have technical and operating aspects in common with earlier BA's.  This results in Hybrid owners having something in common with BA owners and so they frequent the forums as the best source for advice.

Category?  None, it doesn't matter.  Owners of Hybrids and older Solid State rigs can be just as devoted to them, and just as interested in their preservation and operation.  

I see no reason for any friction between any groups that preserve our history, traditions and knowledge!  bill


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: G3RZP on December 10, 2013, 01:54:16 PM
Bill,

I posted this earlier in Elmers:

>Look at transmitter IMD performance. Since the last generation of tube PA rigs, the high order IMD has shot up. For my presentation to the RSGB Convention  (entitled "Spreading the Sewage")this year, I analysed 123 product reviews going way back.

Average 3rd order IMD 1973 - 83  tube rig -36dB, post 2000 SS -30dB
Average 5th order IMD 1973 - 83  tube rig -44dB, Post 2000 SS -41dB
Average 7th order IMD 1973 - 83  tube rig -58dB, Post 2000 SS -47dB
Average 9th order IMD 1973 - 83  tube rig >-66dB, Post 2000 SS -52dB<



Now there's an advantage for the rest of the world in using a boatanchor!



Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: N9WW on December 10, 2013, 06:54:57 PM
No I don't consider the FT-102, or TS-520/530 as BA's.  They are transistorized Hybrids.   [EDIT:  My second rig was a used TS-530, and I still have it.  I carried it around the world on my navy patrol deployments.]

The tube finals have technical and operating aspects in common with earlier BA's.  This results in Hybrid owners having something in common with BA owners and so they frequent the forums as the best source for advice.

Category?  None, it doesn't matter.  Owners of Hybrids and older Solid State rigs can be just as devoted to them, and just as interested in their preservation and operation.  

I see no reason for any friction between any groups that preserve our history, traditions and knowledge!  bill

So a Hallicrafters FPM-300 isn't a BA then...;-)
73,
Jim N9WW


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: KB4QAA on December 10, 2013, 07:52:40 PM
We haven't discussed weight, but the FPM-300 weighs only 25 lbs per the manual.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: N9WW on December 10, 2013, 08:25:31 PM
We haven't discussed weight, but the FPM-300 weighs only 25 lbs per the manual.

Yes, exactly.  But the question remains, when do we start calling the IC-7800, TS-990, FT-5000/9000 boat anchors.  Which they are.  My definition of a boat anchor is a heavy rig.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: KB4QAA on December 10, 2013, 08:27:18 PM
Heavy yes.  But when they get old they will be "Paperweights or Doorstops" not operating old radios. :)


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: N9WW on December 10, 2013, 08:30:53 PM
Heavy yes.  But when they get old they will be "Paperweights or Doorstops" not operating old radios. :)

Agreed...
73,
Jim N9WW


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: G3RZP on December 11, 2013, 12:16:05 AM
I guess that all of us BA aficionados recognise the importance of getting a stock of spare tubes while we can especially PA tubes- although my FT102 has two of the original, as supplied, PA tubes and it's done some hard work over the years.

With a modern SS rig, if you're going to keep it, I feel you should do the same with PA transistors and maybe some of the ICs. Try getting some of the RF power transistors of 20 years ago, especially since many of the companies around then have been taken over/merged/closed as well dropping lines.

In many ways, it's probably easier get the parts to keep a 1938 HRO going to day than some more modern SS rigs.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: W1JKA on December 11, 2013, 03:47:22 AM
Re: G3RZP

Right on the mark. Replacing 2 filter caps and 1 resistor with on hand saved/scavenged parts on my Johnson Adventurer canoe anchor was easier and about ten times quicker than ordering and replacing a faulty phone jack in my IC-7200 rice box. Don't think the ICOM or myself will be operating or repairable 50 years from now.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: KB1WSY on December 11, 2013, 05:07:37 AM
... or myself will be operating or repairable 50 years from now.

Just make sure to stock up on oscillator tubes for the heart, filter capacitors for the liver, and resistors for the blood pressure. You'll be good for another 50 years as long as you have enough spares.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: KD5TXX on December 11, 2013, 06:40:25 AM
I decided I needed a transmitter since I had a receiver.  That's what got me in.  I have no Elmer and THAT proved to be a pain.  I couldn't figure out why my speaker squealed like a pig every time I keyed up.  Took me months to figure out the mute switch and wiring it through the Dow key.  That would have taken all of 5 min with a local Elmer.  I did learn how to spot a busted doorknob capacitor by the smoke trail all on my own.  I still have a long way to go but I do enjoy the feeling when I figure out how to make something work.

My category consists of a person who owns a ton of BA and hopes to someday get them working...but for the moment they help my shack from blowing away in a strong wind.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: W8RXL on December 13, 2013, 04:31:01 PM
My category consists of a person who owns a ton of BA and hopes to someday get them working...but for the moment they help my shack from blowing away in a strong wind.

That's me right now. I have been collecting for a long long time, when it wasn't fashionable to have tubes.

By the way, about the picture it brings back a memory of finding a real prize in the trash. When I was young I have pulled a lot of radios from the trash, and my second SX-88 was found that way. When I collected it, the new owner of the house also gave me the matching HT-20, the boxes they all came in and a bunch of accessories. Everything worked great, used the 88 for a bunch of years and got rid of the set 12 years ago.


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: QRP4U2 on December 16, 2013, 03:57:23 PM
A true BoatAnchor enthusiast is one who works out with weights for the sole purpose of moving the BoatAnchor from the shelf to the bench!

Phil - AC0OB


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: K6TOP on December 20, 2013, 10:42:12 AM
 The SX-88 in the "trash" is a set up and staged  photo, of course. No BAs were harmed.



Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: G4FUT on December 23, 2013, 10:37:25 AM
I'd like to add a supplement to the "Preppers". Namely those who are new to Amateur Radio but don't have the money to buy a "rice box". They see a rig on fleabay for less than $500 (£300 in Her majesty's currency  :) ) and think "That'll get me on the air." Only when they get it home they blow it up, because its so old there was no manual with it, or worse still,......as they would most likely come from a CB background they assume all needles must be full scale deflection to get MAx Power out.
I have personally within the last 12 months bought two blown rugs from the above "preppers", for less than $100 each, and now am spending valuable drinking time mending them. ;)


Title: RE: The Boat Anchor Market as I See it.
Post by: G4FUT on December 23, 2013, 10:41:17 AM
I keep getting this error;-
Quote
Session verification failed. Please try logging out and back in again, and then try again.
and:-
Quote
Your session timed out while posting. Please try to re-submit your message

I want to change the word "RUGS" in my above input to "RIGS".