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Author Topic: CW Certification?  (Read 24780 times)
JOSEPHREDGATE
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« on: January 07, 2015, 09:51:24 AM »

Hello,

I am still in the process of studying for my Technician and General licenses and am learning CW via LCWO.net.  I understand that knowing CW is no longer a requirement for getting licensed, but I would prefer to be proficient at it (at least 20wpm) before I get my ham license.  For some reason, it just doesn't feel right for me to be able to get a license by knowing less than the other veteran hams out there.

My question is: Is there some organization out there that offers certification for CW that I could test with?
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Sincerely and respectfully,
Joseph Redgate (not "Joe" please)

"A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." ~ C.H. Spurgeon
KB2WIG
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« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2015, 09:56:35 AM »

JR,

Check this out,

http://www.arrl.org/qualifying-run-schedule

IF you really want to wait, ok.   But consider the following.

The Novice class license was 5WPM, the General was 13 WPM and the Extra was 20 WPM.


klc
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EXTRALight  1/3 less WPM than a Real EXTRA
KB2HSH
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« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2015, 10:59:27 AM »

Quote from:  link=topic=100789.msg812375#msg812375 date=1420653395
JR,

Check this out,

http://www.arrl.org/qualifying-run-schedule

IF you really want to wait, ok.   But consider the following.

The Novice class license was 5WPM, the General was 13 WPM and the Extra was 20 WPM.


klc

The January Qualifying Run is Friday night.  I have my CP-20...going for 25 and 30 endorsements.

73 de KB2HSH
Springbrook, NY
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JOSEPHREDGATE
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« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2015, 11:11:13 AM »

In the notes column, I know that wpm means words per minute, but what do the two numbers mean?
,
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Sincerely and respectfully,
Joseph Redgate (not "Joe" please)

"A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." ~ C.H. Spurgeon
N9BH
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« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2015, 11:14:33 AM »


IMHO do not wait till you can do 20 wpm before getting your license.  Depending on the person that can take quite a while. There is lots of other stuff you will be learning when you get your license and set up a station and get on the air. Also, getting your license and actually using CW will help you increase speed while enjoying what you are doing.
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N9BH
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« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2015, 11:21:23 AM »


If I am looking at the same numbers as you, they are indication if the speeds being tested start at 35 wpm and go down to 10 wpm, or if they start at 10 wmp and go up to 35 wpm.
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JOSEPHREDGATE
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« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2015, 11:28:23 AM »

That's what I thought, but then I thought that, perhaps, they are the Koch/Farnsworth numbers.
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Sincerely and respectfully,
Joseph Redgate (not "Joe" please)

"A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." ~ C.H. Spurgeon
N1EN
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« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2015, 11:41:00 AM »

My question is: Is there some organization out there that offers certification for CW that I could test with?

In addition to the W1AW runs mentioned, I'll offer a few thoughts:

1.  I can empathize with your desire to master CW before getting licensed.  A chunk of my initial desire to learn CW came from unexpectedly passing my Extra test, and my belief that an Extra ought to know code.  That being said...for me, at least, mastering code is something best "done by doing".  Get on the air, make a few contest/DX contacts, graduate into slow-speed ragchews, etc.

2.  If you want formal, official certification, it's still possible to get a commercial radio telegraphy license from the FCC.  It's up to you whether you go for the full license, or just seek someone out to pass the code tests.
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JOSEPHREDGATE
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« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2015, 12:16:30 PM »

Thank you for that link. Very interesting.  It has me curious about commercial licenses.
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Sincerely and respectfully,
Joseph Redgate (not "Joe" please)

"A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." ~ C.H. Spurgeon
KH6AQ
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« Reply #9 on: January 07, 2015, 03:02:59 PM »

I think that getting ones code speed to 13 wpm before becoming licensed was not the usual route. Especially 20 wpm for the Extra as that license used to require two years with a general or advanced class license. Many of us started as 5 wpm novices and by making many contacts our speed slowly moved up to 13 and then to 20 wpm.
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K3STX
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« Reply #10 on: January 07, 2015, 05:31:34 PM »

Back when I got my Novice ticket in 1978, 5 wpm was all we needed to do and the rest came naturally by on-the-air QSOs. Just get on the air, your first CW contact is certificate enough!!!!

paul
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KB2HSH
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« Reply #11 on: January 08, 2015, 06:00:04 AM »

I think that getting ones code speed to 13 wpm before becoming licensed was not the usual route. Especially 20 wpm for the Extra as that license used to require two years with a general or advanced class license. Many of us started as 5 wpm novices and by making many contacts our speed slowly moved up to 13 and then to 20 wpm.

I was licensed in 1988 as a Novice...when I took my 5 WPM, I froze!  It was so bad that I was manually copying the dits and dahs, and went back to decipher them.  13 WPM for my General was no big deal, but I remember sitting in the room, and just listening to the 20 WPM Extra.  It seemed like an impossibility.

With practice and actual QSOs, speed does indeed increase.  Recently, I had a QSO on 40CW, and after it ended, I called CQ again right away...same speed that I had been working at for the past half hour.  My Galaxy Stellar that sits on my desk and watches DX Spots was on the Reverse Beacon page...I had been at 28 WPM. 

What's even more bizarre about when speed increases...I find that NOW I have a very difficult time copying SLOW code. 

Who'd have thought?!

KB2HSH
Springbrook, NY
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K8AXW
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« Reply #12 on: January 08, 2015, 09:29:45 AM »

I hate to say this......."but back when my interest in ham radio started," Does this sound like an old man talking?) the entry level was General, code speed was 13wpm and if you lived within a 125 mile radius of an FCC examining center this is where you had to go to test.  Oh yes, the FCC examining officer was a steely=eyed, hard nosed ______ that didn't even tell you if you passed.  If you failed you learned later and then had no idea what areas you failed in!

Now.....with that being said, compare this to the way it is now!

No code, testing done by local examiners.....instant pass/fail knowledge, license "pools," and almost instant licensing via the Internet.

It's great that you are determined to learn CW.  If for no other reason it will open a whole new world of ham radio to you.  It is a worthwhile goal!
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A Pessimist is Never Disappointed!
AA4Q
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« Reply #13 on: January 08, 2015, 11:33:43 AM »

study for the tests, take all the tests they offer at your club's next VE session, you should pass 2 or 3 of them that day.

Buy an HF rig, buy a key and paddle, put up a dipole or several. if the rig comes with a microphone, put it in the closet, get on the air and operate CW every day. ragchew with a straight key (join SKCC), then move to the paddle, chase DX, operate contests, start with various state QSO parties and move up from there, ragchew on the weekday evenings. By the time FD comes around in june you'll have your extra and your 20wpm.

welcome to the hobby

AA4Q
SKCC 4061
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KK4MRN
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« Reply #14 on: January 08, 2015, 02:15:33 PM »

http://www.arrl.org/qualifying-run-schedule

The link above mentions the following:
Underline one minute of the highest speed you copied, certify that your copy was made without aid, and send it to ARRL for grading.

How do I certify that my copy was made without aid?

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