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Author Topic: 1949 Dodge mobile station  (Read 27140 times)
W0NTS
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« Reply #15 on: December 15, 2014, 09:55:03 PM »

AS I recall, some rigs used vibrator power supplies.

I'm not absolutely sure, but it seems the Multi Elmac gear was probably correct for this era.

LOL Cheesy,

Dennis   W0NTS
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G3RZP
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« Reply #16 on: December 15, 2014, 11:55:13 PM »

The first mention of Elmac in the catalog section of the ARRL handbooks I have is 1953: they may have been there in 1952 but nothing in 1951 and earlier editions.
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KB4QAA
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« Reply #17 on: December 16, 2014, 08:23:51 AM »

Just a quick review of some early fifties radios:

-Gonset Triband 3-30 converter (1951)
-Gonset Super-6 converter (1952/53)
-Gonset Commander Tx  (1952)

Elmac
-A-54/A-54H transmitter (1951)
-AF-67 transmitter (1953)
-PMR-68 Receiver (1953)

Harvey-Wells TBS-50(series) transmitter (1947)

It seems that receiver development lagged transmitter offerings and converters which fed the car radio were popular and economical.  bill
« Last Edit: December 16, 2014, 08:38:35 AM by KB4QAA » Logged

KA0HCP, ex-KB4QAA Relocated to Ks. April 2019.
G3RZP
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« Reply #18 on: December 16, 2014, 12:55:00 PM »

Trouble is, the converter and BC set approach isn't likely to get many QSOs today!

If one specialised in 29MHz AM, one might do better in terms of contacts, at least for a few years.

I don't know where one would get a 6 volt vibrator supply these days or a 6 volt dynamotor for that matter.
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KB4QAA
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« Reply #19 on: December 17, 2014, 09:35:40 AM »

https://www.tubesandmore.com/search/node/vibrator

Antique Electronic Supply in Phoenix (Mesa) Arizona has vibrators.  Great folks to deal with.  Though they cater more to the guitar crowd these days, much of their stock overlaps with our radio needs.

Dynamotors are readily available on eBay.
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KA0HCP, ex-KB4QAA Relocated to Ks. April 2019.
G3RZP
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« Reply #20 on: December 20, 2014, 01:02:27 AM »

>Dynamotors are readily available on eBay.<

Even 6 volt ones? They were pretty rare back in the 1950s - most of them were 12 or 24 volt.
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AC2EU
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« Reply #21 on: December 20, 2014, 06:46:07 AM »

The story about  50 watts slowing the car down doesn't sound quite right, but is amusing none the less...

I have ARC-5 equipment that I have adapted to 12volt mobile. The worst part of a dynamotor is the start up current surge. For example, the 440 volt 200 ma transmit dynamotor that I am using has a MAX run current of 9 amps ( it runs at about 3.5 amps in standby), but it takes a momentary surge of about 30 amps to start it! A 6 volt version would be twice that.

Running an axillary battery and generator sounds like the best way to go in your case.  It appears to be historically correct as well. 
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G3RZP
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« Reply #22 on: December 20, 2014, 08:03:55 AM »

There were questions as to how big those 'watts' were!

But even at 50 watts, the total drain will be pushing 120 - there's a modulator to consider - so that's around 250 watts into the dynamotor and twice or maybe three times that when the PTT is pressed and the dynamotor starts. It also quite possible that the electrical system sagged at that, affecting ignition.......

And if that '50 watts' of licenced power was in fact more....
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W7VAQ
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« Reply #23 on: January 05, 2015, 07:07:50 AM »

Might I suggest shopping from the 1949 Allied Radio Catalog?? 

Pretty much all of their catalogs, 1929-1981, are right here. That should pretty much spot on to what was available at the time.

http://www.alliedcatalogs.com/catalogs_main.html

As for SSB, Central Electronics introduced the Sideband Slicer in 1951. Those guys were way ahead of their time. Here is a video of one with a Hallicrafters SX-42 that K9SUL posted:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5QM06uRYWA

If you would like more on Central Electronics there is a web site dedicated to their products you can visit. It has pics, brochures and schematics: http://www.ce-multiphase.com/

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KB4QAA
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« Reply #24 on: January 05, 2015, 04:05:20 PM »

The PE103 Dynamotor is probably the most widely manufactured and available unit from the war.  They will run on 6v or 12v.
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KA0HCP, ex-KB4QAA Relocated to Ks. April 2019.
JS6TMW
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« Reply #25 on: February 23, 2015, 01:52:50 AM »

But even at 50 watts, the total drain will be pushing 120 - there's a modulator to consider - so that's around 250 watts into the dynamotor and twice or maybe three times that when the PTT is pressed and the dynamotor starts. It also quite possible that the electrical system sagged at that, affecting ignition.......And if that '50 watts' of licenced power was in fact more....

Brings back memories - my first car (in 1962) was a '53 Dodge Coronet with a 6-volt system. I tried to install my collection of pretty good 2-meter gear in it using a vibrator supply.  It was a disaster before I ever hit the mike PTT because because I had to keep revving the engine to get enough juice or else the rcv converter local oscillator died. And that car had the weird "Gyro-matic" transmission that did not lend itself to fast idling or I'd be on the next block before the receiver started up again.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2015, 01:59:34 AM by EXW6BMZ » Logged
KM1H
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Posts: 5526




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« Reply #26 on: February 24, 2015, 11:45:04 AM »

Quote
The 6V, Pos ground thing is probably going to be an issue to overcome if you want it to be operational. As I recall, by the 1950's most systems were 12V Neg ground. Most of the 6V systems were also Neg ground. You may need to come up with some sort of a DC-DC converter to get power for the radio equipment.

Ford and Mopar were 6V positive ground until 55/56 and dynamotors or vibrators could care less. For a SS PS switch to negative groun, reverse the Ampmeter connections and repolarize the generator. My last vintage mobile station was in a full custom and souped up 53 Ford Victoria which I sold about 5 years ago. Elmac A-54, Gonset triband converter and a Hustler.

Quote
Trouble is, the converter and BC set approach isn't likely to get many QSOs today!

If one specialised in 29MHz AM, one might do better in terms of contacts, at least for a few years.

I don't know where one would get a 6 volt vibrator supply these days or a 6 volt dynamotor for that matter.

Many do quite well with 20-30W during daylight on most any band on AM. Coast to coast USA and DX is common on 10 and 15 and also 12 as many convert the 11M VFO to 12. Even 160 is a nice local commuter band just as it was in the 50's.

Quote
The story about  50 watts slowing the car down doesn't sound quite right, but is amusing none the less...

I can see that happening with those tiny EU cars of the era that barely could pull their own weight! In the US a poorly maintained electrical system could do it, especially the ground cable to a rust frame.

Quote
I can tell what I had in a Desoto of the same vintage. A gonset tuner to the BC radio, a Harvey Wells TBS 50C powered by a PE103 and the antenna was a center loaded whip. I had some help putting this together and as I remember when I keyed the TBS 50 and the dynamotor kicked in the sound was quite impressive. I did not have a leece neville alternator so this raised heck with the battery, very short transmissions.  Donna K1AZG 

I had a Gonset and TBS-50D in a 49 Ford in 57-8. Used a WW2 surplus tank antenna for 10M and added a loading coil and whip for 20M. For real fun Id make the 10 mile drive to the Atlantic ocean from my home in LI NY and get a nice 20-30dB improvement as I drove there!

In the early 60's I had a W2EWL 20/75 SSB TX in a 57 Chevy. The RX was a HB 12BA6, 12AT7 converter and a free running 2N706 262 kc BFO added to the car radio with a toggle switch under the dash. That worked OK until I got a loaner NCX-3 and then a NCX-5 from National Radio; that is also when I started cursing sweep tubes!

Carl

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KA4LFP
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« Reply #27 on: March 06, 2015, 07:50:21 PM »



Just on general purposes, you might want to read Alan's site- --
He has a lot of good info on mobile operating that's likely still relevant ideas for you, even though you're considering older radios.

http://www.k0bg.com/
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K9EID
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« Reply #28 on: March 06, 2015, 09:27:33 PM »


The Harvey Wells TBS 50D with PE 60 dynamotor was popular during that period.   I have the set up in a 57 Ford.
The Harvey Wells is very unique.  Can be used on 6 v or 12 v and only needs about + 350 - 400 volts Dc which the dynamotor provided.

The receiver is easily handled as you are now, with a GOnset convert mounted on the steering column and feeding the AM radio. 

Works great. 

I still have my Harvey Wells and use it on 3880 and 3885 occassionally.

Have Fun.....  and those were the days to have some real fun with AMateur Radio mobile..
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W4OP
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« Reply #29 on: March 07, 2015, 01:27:03 PM »

While I have had the Gonset Twins, I think the Cadillac of 1950's mobile rigs had to be the Morrow Twins:
http://www.parelectronics.com/vintage-morrow-twins.php

Gorgeous plate modulation, and a RX that had all the bells and whistles of the day- including an effective AM squelch. I use the rigs today as a fixed station- mostly on 10M AM. They won't fit in my  2005 T-Bird.

Dale W4OP

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