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Author Topic: Marine mobile 20m antenna recommendation  (Read 21475 times)
VE3VID
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Posts: 152




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« Reply #15 on: March 26, 2015, 04:31:54 PM »

Wow!  Yeah, alright then!   Grin   Would need 2 for the job then.  Suddenly that vertical on the stern rail is looking good again.  hihih   Maybe a matched set of verticals 
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NK8X
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #16 on: March 27, 2015, 04:34:46 PM »

I have had excellent results using a Par (now LNR) end-fed 1/2 wave between the top of the mast and the stern rail.

My boat has a split backstay, and it doesn't appear to affect performance much.

Art

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ZENKI
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Posts: 1621




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« Reply #17 on: April 06, 2015, 06:01:56 AM »

 The typical backstay  length on a yacht is close to 5/8ths wavelength. Since you operating over liquid gold in terms of the ground any vertical antenna would work very well.
Just ignore all the  silly grounding theories that abound about yacht counterpoises. Yachts people are the only ones on the planet that seem to want to lay down a copper mine in their
boats combating mythical ground loss when they sailing over RF liquid gold. Yes,,, vertical antennas do  need a counterpoise especially a end fed random length of wire. The other possibility that could also be considered is to use the whole  rig and feed  all the rigging as an antenna. It works very well when using a automatic coupler like the SGC230.

What you do have to be careful about when using verticals is the massive shadowing/coupling and resultant pattern distortion from the rigging. Depending on the boat size and rigging some verticals can be rendered useless because of rigging interaction. In my opinion the least troublesome antenna is the backstay. You dont need to use  backstay insulators. You can rig a parallel  backstay on insulators which will work just as well. Its  the cheapest way to rig an effective antenna on a yacht.

Just observe all  HAM practices about feeding end fed wires. Loading your boat with a ton of ferrite and copper will not always solve problems that result from  improperly feeding a random length wire as a multiband antenna.
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