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Author Topic: New ham loosing interest really fast.  (Read 134028 times)
AC2EU
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« Reply #30 on: April 25, 2015, 08:55:40 PM »

I fail to understand the mollycoddling.

K5TED:
I'm beginning to think that YOU were the NCS that he was talking about!
What the NCS said wasn't even true, but nothing more than "one-upmanship" or being a boorish braggard. It was uncalled for behavior and not a very good first impression. No coddling, but know that everyone has to start somewhere.

Do you understand yet?


 



A beginner thinker like yourself can be excused for thinking stupid thoughts and actually posting them here for all to see.

I KNEW you were one of those FUN guys!  There's always a few in every club Grin
Mission accomplished, the newbie is gone for good...
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K5TED
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Posts: 241




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« Reply #31 on: April 26, 2015, 08:18:12 AM »

I fail to understand the mollycoddling.

K5TED:
I'm beginning to think that YOU were the NCS that he was talking about!
What the NCS said wasn't even true, but nothing more than "one-upmanship" or being a boorish braggard. It was uncalled for behavior and not a very good first impression. No coddling, but know that everyone has to start somewhere.

Do you understand yet?


 



A beginner thinker like yourself can be excused for thinking stupid thoughts and actually posting them here for all to see.

I KNEW you were one of those FUN guys!  There's always a few in every club Grin
Mission accomplished, the newbie is gone for good...


I'm sorta fun. I like ham radio. I like to introduce the hobby to those who show an interest, even if it is very narrow.

It's sad that at some point this newbie guy was given the impression that all he had to do is buy a handie talkie and the world would be his oyster.

We're seeing only his perspective. An obvious disdain for adults/authority. A potty mouth. Feelings of entitlement. Poor interpersonal skills. Inferiority issues. A victim.

Or....... a seagull. I'm beginning to think the latter is the case..
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KC8WUC
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Posts: 69




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« Reply #32 on: April 26, 2015, 08:55:57 AM »

My experience with one club that I joined was very similar, both on the air and off.  The President of the club was one that was periennially re-elected President or to some other officer position as were all of his friends.  At the club meetings the same old business was re-hashed and only the President's friends/fellow officers were ever permitted to do anything. Likewise, the only ideas and motions that were ever entertained or recognized by the President came from his friends.  His attitude was that he knew more than anyone else because he was a charter member of the club and he was an electronics professional (HE WORKED AT RADIO SHACK AS A SALESMAN!).  Even when I volunteered for some of the ARES and RACES activities, I was never given a thank you or any recognition for donating my time to the effort.

I regularly attended all business meetings and participated in nets for three years before I decided that this wasn't for me and left the club.

Yes, jerks can be found in all walks of life, in all occupations, and in many hobbies.   There will always be know-it-alls who will bully or demean you in some way.  Just move on, their absence from your life will have a profound effect on you... you'll certainly be happier.  It's unlikely that if you stay, you won't change their narcissistic personality or their obnoxious behaviors. 


73,

Michael KC8WUC/WDE9344
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KX4OM
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Posts: 372




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« Reply #33 on: May 02, 2015, 05:51:54 PM »

I won't criticize a guy for being 70 years old, because I'm creeping ever closer to that age myself. I still check the filaments in my CONELRAD receiver every day.

Ted, KX4OM
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 3342




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« Reply #34 on: May 03, 2015, 04:18:14 PM »



However, it is obvious that he is a "prepper" who is deluded into expecting the end of civilization and domestic war.

He truly is NOT a genuine ham.  (and I have never said that about anyone before).



This is interesting...on one hand we're telling Matt, there's something for everyone in ham, find another sandbox to play in.
Then this.....A prepper can't be a "genuine ham"? The fact is, he's part of a very large segment of hams.

Now that the embers have cooled.

The OP stated his reason for having a license is to fight the next urban civil war or fight in Armeggedon.

This is clearly outside the stated purposes of amateur radio as defined by the  FCC.  

I do not encourage 'preppers' to get a license.  I think they are deluded fools, and the idea ham radio being necessary in a true survival situation is silly.

Note:  I make a major distinction  between having a common sense store of food, water and essentials, and people who subscribe to 'prepper' philosophy.

Bottom line: If the OP wants to use ham radio for fighting or prepper purposes, I encourage him to tear up his license and go away.  If he chooses to join our hobby and it's culture of electronics, radio operating and comradery, then 'Welcome".   b.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2015, 04:24:35 PM by KB4QAA » Logged

KA0HCP, ex-KB4QAA Relocated to Ks. April 2019.
K0CBA
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Posts: 439




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« Reply #35 on: May 04, 2015, 08:41:43 AM »

, some 70 year old, Matt

There is certainly always hope you don't make it to 70......speaking of "a-holes"!
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WB5GSA
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #36 on: May 06, 2015, 12:18:43 PM »

I am a 77 year old who just recently decided to get back into hamming after a near 30 year hiatus. I feel like Rip Van Winkle but since my background is technical, I have little problem with the new technology.

I agree with the folks who say to upgrade and forget the myopia of 2M. It sounds quite similar to CB when I stopped hamming in the early 80s.

Please let us be civil in these conversations. The same as 20M was in the 60s and 70s except for a few idiots. I don't know how long I'll stick around on the bands but I want to try the digital modes and other communications media.

73 to everyone,

Rick WB5GSA
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NI8R
Member

Posts: 323




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« Reply #37 on: May 10, 2015, 07:45:58 AM »

Matt, few things  to help would be log in under your call sign. Its respectful.
One of the greatest generation of humans to live were born in the 40s . This is a generation that was not a stranger to work.
Very respectful of others.
Work creates the wealth you described that bought his radios and his work ethic got him his license to his ham privileges.
I always encourage hams to buy expensive radio gear.  Better gear will increase your time at your hobby
Instead of spending money doing something else, fishing is expensive too.

You may wear your feelings on your sleeve. They are bound to be knocked off. This guy if given a chance may be the best friend you ever had.
Get a invite to his shack. You may be missing an opportunity to know a great individual.


Greg kc8iir

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AC2EU
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« Reply #38 on: May 10, 2015, 07:57:19 AM »

Matt, few things  to help would be log in under your call sign. Its respectful.
One of the greatest generation of humans to live were born in the 40s . This is a generation that was not a stranger to work.
Very respectful of others.
Work creates the wealth you described that bought his radios and his work ethic got him his license to his ham privileges.
I always encourage hams to buy expensive radio gear.  Better gear will increase your time at your hobby
Instead of spending money doing something else, fishing is expensive too.

You may wear your feelings on your sleeve. They are bound to be knocked off. This guy if given a chance may be the best friend you ever had.
Get a invite to his shack. You may be missing an opportunity to know a great individual.


Greg kc8iir



A good work ethic is a wonderful thing.
However, was the NCS promoting a work ethic or just being a snob?
It is said that you don't get a second chance to make a good first impression...
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SOFAR
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Posts: 1490




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« Reply #39 on: May 10, 2015, 08:32:53 AM »

I don't see how buying expensive gear and cutting out other options for recreation solves anything. .... Im a proponent for quality gear, but being in my 40s, buying a new mountain bike will come first. I really like radio, but don't see myself spending hours with it, to the exclusion of other activities. .... I notice on this forum that a lot of operators have taken breaks of 20 or 30 years. ....Im not going that extreme, but will keep studying cw, and try to talk to some locals on simplex once a week.
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SOFAR
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Posts: 1490




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« Reply #40 on: May 10, 2015, 08:57:10 AM »

As for the OPs issue with older operators. Just want to add that most have been very friendly and engaging. ....If i throw my call out they come back to me. .... But i don't hang out on nets or repeaters..
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NI8R
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Posts: 323




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« Reply #41 on: May 10, 2015, 11:44:04 AM »

Quote from:  link=topic=102627.msg843205#msg843205 date=1431273430
As for the OPs issue with older operators. Just want to add that most have been very friendly and engaging. ....If i throw my call out they come back to me. .... But i don't hang out on nets or repeaters..

With age comes wisdom , you have 2 eyes , 2 ears and one mouth.  You need to look and listen twice as much as you speak. This is the problem with America today. Everyone is a know it all.
As we age , we all develop different ways to get our point across. Some elders are blunt to the point of being rude, but its only because they don't have all day to get you to understand a sugary response.
I am short answer joe at 45 , I am sure I will be that prick when I am 70 hi  hi. Ok boys , get out the hurt feelings reports.

Sofar, ham radio is your second love, sounds like mountain biking is your main event. You should buy the best bike you can afford since radios are your second hobby.


Greg kc8iir
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SOFAR
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Posts: 1490




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« Reply #42 on: May 10, 2015, 12:05:10 PM »

Yes I believe listening to get a feel for things is important. ....As far as a main hobby, my interests are varied, just don't see a hobby as an end-all. Radio, camping, and biking is one example of hobbies that can be combined, or be pursued individually.
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NI8R
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« Reply #43 on: May 10, 2015, 03:45:53 PM »

you have a lot of time to chase 3 hobbies. After working 60 hours a week , raising 3 kids and working the farm. One hobby is enough for me.

Kc8iir
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KF7VXA
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Posts: 568




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« Reply #44 on: May 10, 2015, 09:51:26 PM »

Ares nets are very different in different areas.

We started a radio club for people who are interested in many different aspects of Amateur Radio, but are not interested in Ares or Emcom/Community service. We also have an Ares group comprised of club members and others who also have an interest in Public Service.

Our County EC has incorporated our Ares group into the County emergency plan. We are in a rural area and don't have hundreds of public servant's to draw from in an emergency, so we all have agreed to help wherever necessary.

This works well for our group. We have a very dedicated Ares EC who wants to get us all the training that is available; our group is a motivated group. All are agreeable to this.
If you want to be a part of an emergency radio group, why would you not take the time to do the four ICS on line training classes. ICS is now the standard for Emcom. More training, practical training will do nothing but improve the groups ability to handle emergency communications in the most efficient way possible.

Too many Ares groups do the boring once a week check in's and little else. It's no wonder people get tired of doing so little.
Long time operators may know what to do in an emergency, but where does that leave the new guys and gals who want to be a part of community service ? It also does not effect changes to the way emergency communications have changed.

If we are to be taken seriously in an emergency by local, state and the federal government, training and knowing how to interface with governmental agency's is a must. Otherwise we are looked at like a bunch of good ol boy CBers.

Times have changed and if those who want to be a part of Emcom want to be viewed as a valid part of Emcom, we must change also. Otherwise, rag chew, DX, do digital or whatever you enjoy and forget Emcom.

In today's world, Amateur radio is likely to be the only form of radio that may be available in the onset of a major disaster.

Almost all local agency's have gone to trunked systems that work fine in normal times, but will be the first thing to fail in a disaster.
Once the State and Feds finally get to the affected area, they will establish their own comms and then Amateur radio will be secondary. That's fine with me. Thing is, our group will be prepared to work with governmental agency's as needed. Our County EC thinks highly of our group and will use us as much as possible.

It's developing relationships with your local Emergency Coordinator that will make us a valid and useful part of Emcom.
Unless your group is willing to get the training and do actual on air exercises and work with the local County EC, then we will not be relevant.

The times have changed. If you're not willing to change also, maybe Emcom is not your cup of tea.

Having made the relationships with the agency's in our county, we will be an integral part of any emergency, in fact, they have made it known that they are counting on us, so we had better be up to the task. We hold joint exercises to ensure we are all on the same page. We are also included in all community events. Some of our members are also a part of our local SAR group, helping with communications so that those who can put on a pack and hump up it a mountain are not stuck at the staging area.

I'm sure some will hammer me for my views, and that's fine. If we are to be looked at as a service that contributes to the resolution of an emergency, we have to keep up with the times. If your not willing to do this, then maybe it's time to enjoy the other aspects of radio.
If we are needed and fail to live up to expectations, we will be irrelevant in the future. Never forget, we enjoy the radio spectrum we have because the government knows we are a necessity in times of emergency. If we fail at those times, they might just figure our spectrum is more valuable being sold for business use.

There are many groups who are doing things right. It's been shown time and time again that Amateur radio is important to emergency's and disasters. These are the groups who are keeping up with the times.

To the OP, hang in there and maybe you can convince some in your group to not worry about having the latest, most expensive gear, but learning to use what you have and get your group up to speed in todays emcom.
If the net control operator cannot be professional, maybe it's time he handed over the mic to someone else, but you too must be professional.

John
« Last Edit: May 10, 2015, 10:12:41 PM by KF7VXA » Logged
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