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Author Topic: Boat anchors in Hollywood  (Read 24479 times)
JS6TMW
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« on: August 08, 2015, 07:13:20 PM »

Avengers 2 was showing on my flight to Narita and it was hard to not look away from the nonstop special effects although it was really giving me a headache. My reward was a 1/2-second shot of an otherwise high-tech console in some operations room, that included a pie-shaped yellow-lighted dial that could have only been an old Hallicrafters SX. Crazy out of place but it some set designer must have thought it was cool-looking, as do we.
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KAPT4560
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« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2015, 02:56:34 AM »

 The venerable SX-42 also appears to have accompanied many inter-planetary rocketship voyages back in the 1950's.  Grin
 It was state-of-the-art communications in its day.
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WA2ISE
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« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2015, 05:04:33 PM »

From "Forbidden Planet"


Some of it looks like bare boatanchors, and a rack of more boatanchor equipment.
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ONAIR
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« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2015, 10:33:31 PM »

From "Forbidden Planet"


Some of it looks like bare boatanchors, and a rack of more boatanchor equipment.

    Boat anchors in the 22nd century!  Wink
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G3RZP
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« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2015, 07:09:57 AM »

Not quite Hollywood (although United Artists bankrolled it) is the James Bond film 'Dr. No'. This starts a KW Electronics 'Vanguard' transmitter, dating from the 50s: 10 - 80m, (some models added 160) AM/CW (although with a drift like Kon Tiki on 10m CW) with a 6146 PA, modulated by push-pull 6L6s. The woman is told to change frequency and adjusts the PA plate tuning - at which point, quite rightly, she is shot! I seem to recall that there's Racal RA17 in there somewhere.

I remember a film from the '70s - 'Our Man Flint' or some such title. That has a Drake TR4 and a Vibroplex key....
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KD0REQ
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« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2015, 09:14:34 AM »

M probably had the Racal pop out of a fountain pen....
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KG6YV
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« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2015, 02:50:37 PM »

Here is a "classic".... In the movie Manchurian candidate Laurence Harvey goes up in the rafters of the convention center to shoot the candidate (supposedly) with a rifle.  On his right side in this little room is a BC375 transmitter, supposed to be the PA system.  Ha!!!

Its the original movie with Frank Sinatra as the cop...

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KE6EE
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« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2015, 02:55:49 PM »

with a drift like Kon Tiki...

That's surely the best phrase of the day! Cheesy
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N4NYY
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« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2015, 05:41:31 PM »

The Waltons used a ham radio to listen to the war communications in WWII. I could not see/remember the model, however.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2015, 10:15:26 AM by N4NYY » Logged
KM1H
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« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2015, 03:00:09 PM »

The Waltons was a 38 Zenith 12S232 12 tube table model which covered the BCB to 18mc; I have the 9 tube 9S232 version in my collection.

Carl
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KAPT4560
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« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2015, 03:33:55 AM »

 I remember the passage in the book: The Sands of Mars by Arthur C. Clarke.
 The astronauts had to boost output of the ship's transceiver by boosting operating voltages. Some of the tubes were short-lived and the spares were used up during the last-ditch, maximum-power transmission.
 Although there were no pictures of the transceiver, you could imagine what it looked like with tubes burning up and being changed in order to keep it running. You could feel the anxiety of the crew.
 Sir Arthur C. Clarke was a master at writing believable and thrilling sci-fi because of his science-based thinking and background.
 I do enjoy the passages in sci-fi books that describe the 'gee-whiz' 1950's era thinking of what future advanced technology would be like.
 The thought that solid-state would only be relegated to simple, low-power circuits and that robust, state-of-the-art vacuum tubes would still be necessary for space travel.  Cheesy
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WA2ISE
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« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2015, 01:03:00 PM »

I remember the passage in the book: The Sands of Mars by Arthur C. Clarke.
 The astronauts had to boost output of the ship's transceiver by boosting operating voltages. Some of the tubes were short-lived and the spares were used up during the last-ditch, maximum-power transmission.
 

I would have worked on the antenna instead.  Like a multi-element beam (assuming you know where to point it).  Or a homebrew bigger microwave dish, if applicable. 

In other movies, there were "boatanchors" in "Dr Strangelove".  Inside the B52, the CRM114 discriminitor radio set.
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N4NYY
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« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2015, 10:13:17 AM »

The Waltons was a 38 Zenith 12S232 12 tube table model which covered the BCB to 18mc; I have the 9 tube 9S232 version in my collection.

Carl


He was transmitting on it! LOL
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N3QE
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Posts: 5593




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« Reply #13 on: August 17, 2015, 09:48:54 AM »

I always liked the Eico 720 in the sherriff's office in Andy Griffith :-)

Even better, Ron Howard has the Apollo 11 LEM. "Me and my brothers, we hid up in the rafters, we saw the whole thing!". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9OQwZDTPoU
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KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 820




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« Reply #14 on: August 18, 2015, 12:01:36 AM »

I remember the passage in the book: The Sands of Mars by Arthur C. Clarke.
 The astronauts had to boost output of the ship's transceiver by boosting operating voltages. Some of the tubes were short-lived and the spares were used up during the last-ditch, maximum-power transmission.
 Although there were no pictures of the transceiver, you could imagine what it looked like with tubes burning up and being changed in order to keep it running. You could feel the anxiety of the crew.
 Sir Arthur C. Clarke was a master at writing believable and thrilling sci-fi because of his science-based thinking and background.
 I do enjoy the passages in sci-fi books that describe the 'gee-whiz' 1950's era thinking of what future advanced technology would be like.
 The thought that solid-state would only be relegated to simple, low-power circuits and that robust, state-of-the-art vacuum tubes would still be necessary for space travel.  Cheesy

Hey, we went to the moon using tech that seems laughably primitive today. If you're p'd about not being able to travel to the moon on a Pan Am space plane, blame Nixon, who gutted the space program in the early 70s. The Russians built a shuttle from stolen plans and determined that it was useless. Now the only way we have of getting to the ISS is Russian rockets.
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