Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: college ham radio clubs  (Read 14914 times)
WA2ISE
Member

Posts: 1258




Ignore
« on: September 22, 2015, 10:15:18 AM »

I paid a visit to my college Syracuse U last weekend, to see old friends and a football game.  While on campus, I noticed that the HF antenna atop one building (Hinds Hall) was gone, and the club shack we had in another building (the electrical engineering dept one) was also gone.  I knew that the club call had expired some years ago.  Only thing that still exists is an electrical outlet I installed almost 40 years ago to tap into a lighting circuit that would run off building emergency power so we could operate our radios if the power went out (so we could do emergency comms if needed). 

Back in the mid 70's when I was at college we'd do events like a traffic net where we invited students to send messages to friends off campus on Valentine's Day.  This  was back in the day before cell phones had even been invented, and phone calls were insanely expensive.  This was something we did to shot the student government that we did stuff to justify our club funding. 

Is dead college ham clubs a common occurance today?  Or maybe it's just a dry spell at SU right now.
Logged
N5VTU
Member

Posts: 388




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2015, 01:34:37 PM »

I experienced a similar situation at my school.  I attended the University of Houston in the mid nineties.  We had a modest HF station -Atlas 350XL Transceiver, Dentron MLA2500 Amp, TH6DXX on a 40 foot tower that sat atop a 3 story building.  In 2012 I returned to campus for a seminar, and noticed the tower and beam were no longer there.  I ventured inside the building to where the station used to be (in a custodial closet) and found the area had been remodeled completely, with no hint of a radio station, closet, or anything else I recognized from my time on campus.  Our club membership averaged only a dozen or so while I was there.  Once I graduated, I lost touch with the club, but found out a few years later that the faculty sponsor (a ham) left the school, and the trustee of the club call sign had passed away.  The best I can tell, the club simply went away because there was nobody there to keep it alive, which I suspect happens quite frequently.  I've tried to locate former members of the school club online to no avail.

On a positive note, there does seem to be increased interest in ham radio in the primary and secondary schools in my area due to a renewed focus on STEM subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math).  Perhaps some of these bright young minds will have enough interest in ham radio to take it with them to college and form or revive clubs.

Stephen
N5VTU
Logged
N3AIS
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2015, 01:23:00 PM »

We are presently restarting the University of Toronto Amateur Radio Society.  The club did have its last activity in 2007 or so.  It is common for college ham clubs to come and go depending on interest and especially a trusted long-time club trustee.

Look for stations in the ARRL School Club Roundup, held twice a year.  You will see a lot of schools QRV from Elementary to University levels.

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/SCR-L/info

Paul
VE3EEI
Logged
AF7JA
Member

Posts: 271




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2015, 10:08:20 AM »

I finished my MBA in 2010 and, to the best of my knowledge there was no Amateur Radio association on campus.

As far as Amateur Radio in Middle and Secondary schools, I am a technology teacher at  a Title 1 (low income) middle school and there are no signs whatsoever of Amateur Radio. If there was a real interest in promoting a program there is a need to lesson plans that use Amateur radio. Ideally a package of lessons that can be applied to an after-school program.

However, the first thing is a need to create a compelling "unique selling point" for amateur radio. There needs to be something that Amateur Radio can do for the district that will make them say "yes, adopt the program." there also needs to be a selling point to the students, something that will make them say "yes, I want to do that (and I see not way to do that with alternate technologies, such as a cell phone)." So far i don't see answers to those questions that are attractive enough for me to try to pitch Amateur radio to the district.
Logged
JS6TMW
Member

Posts: 1254




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2015, 03:11:18 PM »

I enjoyed my very active HS and college clubs back when ham radio was a popular hobby for young folks and budding engineers. Now that I am well-aged, I admit I can't see any attraction for kids to listen to a fading, noisy and boring conversation with some old coot in Podunk. What might have modern appeal is a SDR station or one set up for satellite communications.

Just my 2.2 Yen before going back on 15 meters to find some other geezers to talk to.

Steve in Okinawa
Logged
KG9H
Member

Posts: 82


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2015, 04:43:07 PM »

I went to Michigan Technological University and we had an active club back in the early 70's.  The club station was W8YY.
We had some old Heath stuff that was monstrous and then in my Senior year someone's Dad donated a Drake T4X and R4 system.
By that time I was off-campus but the momentum still exists.
Later in life I donated some (20) Motorola crystal 440 rigs to the club.  Some of the radios still are operational in the UP as well as a few of the frequencies that we started with some repeaters.  146.88 and 440.5
I was up there a few months back and while there was no one around to let me in.. the frequencies still have repeaters running on them.
A few weeks back I ran into an engineer at Motorola Solutions and he was one of the recipients of the Motorola radios I donated.
Cool stuff.  de KG9H, ex WA9YXY
Logged
N3AIS
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2017, 12:04:22 PM »

Steve,  If we actually get college age people to get back on the air, they won't have to rely on old geezers to talk to.  VE3EEI
Logged
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 3703




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2017, 12:45:51 PM »

Back in the '60s through '80s, many of the kids coming into college had been exposed to radio for years via walkie talkies and/or 11 meters.  That seemed to generate a greater curiosity and interest about radio for many of them.  Unfortunately, that path seems to no longer exist.
Logged
SOFAR
Member

Posts: 1384




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2017, 01:18:02 PM »

Back in the '60s through '80s, many of the kids coming into college had been exposed to radio for years via walkie talkies and/or 11 meters.  That seemed to generate a greater curiosity and interest about radio for many of them.  Unfortunately, that path seems to no longer exist.

What about FRS transceivers? I hear kids using them, and their parents also.

The father usually starts walking away from home, to see what kind of range they have. With my antenna I can hear both parties from a distance.

With FRS they can hear the GMRS repeaters, so that's also a gateway into radio.
Logged
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 3703




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2017, 03:54:16 PM »

Back in the '60s through '80s, many of the kids coming into college had been exposed to radio for years via walkie talkies and/or 11 meters.  That seemed to generate a greater curiosity and interest about radio for many of them.  Unfortunately, that path seems to no longer exist.

What about FRS transceivers? I hear kids using them, and their parents also.

The father usually starts walking away from home, to see what kind of range they have. With my antenna I can hear both parties from a distance.

With FRS they can hear the GMRS repeaters, so that's also a gateway into radio.
  When the kids were using 11 meter walkie talkies, many of them were able to actually hear their local hams chatting because of the walkie's wide open receivers!  When they graduated on to CB, they were able to tinker with microphones and antennas, and got a first hand taste of "skip" signals coming in from thousands of miles away!  They could chat with stations 50+ miles away on a regular basis, and just like hams, many of them even exchanged QSL cards!  Almost none of that is possible with FRS or GMRS units.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2017, 04:01:41 PM by ONAIR » Logged
JS6TMW
Member

Posts: 1254




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: January 25, 2017, 06:02:48 AM »

I enjoyed my very active HS and college clubs back when ham radio was a popular hobby for young folks and budding engineers. Now that I am well-aged, I admit I can't see any attraction for kids to listen to a fading, noisy and boring conversation with some old coot in Podunk. What might have modern appeal is a SDR station or one set up for satellite communications.

Just my 2.2 Yen before going back on 15 meters to find some other geezers to talk to.

Steve in Okinawa

I posted the above 13 months ago. Since then, I have become addicted to the FM satellites and am up on my roof several times a day waving the nerdy antenna around. One big reason for this mania is that 15 meters has been dead as a doornail for months now!

I also started using digital modes because of terrible band conditions. Not yet so up-to-date that I am using SDR, but the other night I was thrilled to see on pskreporter that my JT-65 was received by my old college station W6BB.

Steve in Okinawa
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!