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Author Topic: Power using Rigrunner  (Read 6799 times)
KG5ELA
Member

Posts: 26




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« Reply #15 on: September 30, 2015, 10:07:21 AM »

I am talking more about cheap as in price, not quality.  I don't need to break two legs and an arm to buy something I will rarely use. I am all for spending money, but for me spending it wisely is important. I am the consummate researcher and am continuing to do so. I just found a ratcheting crimper from Grainger that will go from 8-16 awg for $25.40 to use on uninsulated terminals.

It will probably take me a month or so to get all the items I need to install my unit and I will use it wisely. Something I hadn't mentioned is that I come from an Electronics Technician background. I worked for years building many military grade antennas and control units. I was once NASA certified in Hand Soldering Techniques. All of our stuff was QA certified. I understand about doing a good job. I can't tell you how many RF cables we built, it was in the thousands. We had the tools for the job.  Most of the stuff I will be doing with this installation is outside of the tools we used for our job so I need to get good ones, just not $50-$150 or more for a crimper I will use a couple of times here and there.

Many technicians I worked with were just happy to do a job. I always felt that my work was more than just doing a job. I have had people come to me and ask if I thought I was an artist or something. My answer was always that I am not an artist, however, my work was more than just throwing something together and make it work. Yes, it had to work, but it also had to look nice and function well. In a way there is a bit of artistry in what I did. I plan on trying to use those skills for this install. That is one of the reasons I am asking these questions so I make sure that I do a good job in a field I am not entirely familiar with. Some aspects of it will be the same, like workmanship, others will be new, but I plan on doing a good job. To make it look good, function well, and be proud of what I did.
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Tim
K0BG
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Posts: 10248


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« Reply #16 on: September 30, 2015, 10:39:43 AM »

Precisely! I just wish more folks understand the importance of job one!
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K9PHT
Member

Posts: 79




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« Reply #17 on: September 30, 2015, 02:32:20 PM »

I do the same thing here but use the BLUE SEA PRODUCTS...  They have a multi-output source that are all fused just like the rig runner...   These all use regular ring terminal connections...

I also use one of the BLUE SEA FUSE BLOCK assemblies close to the battery connection.  Mine has a 60AMP fuse in it...





All connection between the battery, fuse panel, and the DC SUB panel are 4AWG cabling with crimp on proper sized RING TERMINALS...   The SUB PANEL goes directly to frame ground using 4AWG cable.

Then I run the regular Ham Radio provided 12VDC cables that use the ring terminal connections... etc...

Works great for me...

The only thing I have against the rig runner connections is how easy they are to vibrate or get pulled out of their sockets when being used...

Roy Ken

« Last Edit: September 30, 2015, 02:34:23 PM by K9PHT » Logged
AC7CW
Member

Posts: leet




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« Reply #18 on: September 30, 2015, 02:44:25 PM »



Many technicians I worked with were just happy to do a job. I always felt that my work was more than just doing a job. I have had people come to me and ask if I thought I was an artist or something. My answer was always that I am not an artist, however, my work was more than just throwing something together and make it work. Yes, it had to work, but it also had to look nice and function well. In a way there is a bit of artistry in what I did. I plan on trying to use those skills for this install. That is one of the reasons I am asking these questions so I make sure that I do a good job in a field I am not entirely familiar with. Some aspects of it will be the same, like workmanship, others will be new, but I plan on doing a good job. To make it look good, function well, and be proud of what I did.

I worked as a tech for decades. One job that I had for years was pretty cushy. We had time and we had budget. I used to make stuff that was a work of art. I had friends in the machine shop and they were happy to machine panels out of delrin. I had a label maker that really made nice looking labels that never fell off. I'm a photographer and have an eye for what looks good so I built stuff that looked good unless the engineer objected. Strangely a lot of them expressly did not care how it looked.

I learned about customers while doing that work. Most of them didn't know exactly what they wanted until they saw what I built for them. Some would realize that they wanted a switch or something and act like I'd forgotten it. I learned what Steve Jobs learned: "It's not the customer's job to know what they want". Eventually I learned to make them give me a schematic and initial it with time and date. They were blaming me for holding up their schedules! I'd build them a first iteration very quickly and show it to them and then they would finalize their design and I'd build it. That worked great for everyone.

I worked on a touch screen device for the medical industry. We got it all up and running and brought in some doctors. They didn't like it. They liked the switches and knobs that they trusted. Years later Apple brought out the iPad and it is a huge success...

I feel sorry for these radio manufacturers that have to make something that hams will like. Maybe someone will come out with a rig that is entirely modular: Triple conversion or SDR, direct sampling or not, menus or buttons, knobs or mouse/keyboard with it's display showing the price as it's configured...
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Novice 1958, 20WPM Extra now... (and get off my lawn)
KG5ELA
Member

Posts: 26




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« Reply #19 on: September 30, 2015, 05:04:40 PM »

I do the same thing here but use the BLUE SEA PRODUCTS...  They have a multi-output source that are all fused just like the rig runner...   These all use regular ring terminal connections...

I also use one of the BLUE SEA FUSE BLOCK assemblies close to the battery connection.  Mine has a 60AMP fuse in it...





All connection between the battery, fuse panel, and the DC SUB panel are 4AWG cabling with crimp on proper sized RING TERMINALS...   The SUB PANEL goes directly to frame ground using 4AWG cable.

Then I run the regular Ham Radio provided 12VDC cables that use the ring terminal connections... etc...

Works great for me...

The only thing I have against the rig runner connections is how easy they are to vibrate or get pulled out of their sockets when being used...

Roy Ken



So you didn't run ground from the battery?
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Tim
ND6M
Member

Posts: 804




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« Reply #20 on: October 01, 2015, 06:31:13 AM »

How do you know? ;-)  So the Rigrunner has a 40 amp fuse for the incoming voltage, what should I use near the battery?

Just out of curiosity though, what would a fuse at the battery provide over the incoming fuse at the Rigrunner? If the wires shorted wouldn't the Rigrunner fuse be sufficient?
the 40 amp fuse protects the Rigrunner COMPONENT,........... a fuse near the battery protects the ENTIRE wiring system.
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K9PHT
Member

Posts: 79




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« Reply #21 on: October 10, 2015, 10:04:25 AM »

KG5ELA - I have run dual cable cables mostly when I am doing a very high current run. Usually I just go to frame ground using braid or solid bare copper #10 or #8 size. I also have used 4AWG flex cables as well for the ground to frame connections.

I really have not had any issues not running a second GROUND lead from the battery connection for my 50WATT and 100WATT radio units   My frame connection from the battery banks is heavy duty and I use a good solid method of connecting to the frame ground.  Always use just one connection when going to frame ground.

Most of my 12VDC SUB PANELS are usually close to the battery frame ground connections...

Roy Ken
k9pht - King George VA...

« Last Edit: October 10, 2015, 10:10:57 AM by K9PHT » Logged
KG5ELA
Member

Posts: 26




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« Reply #22 on: October 14, 2015, 08:57:41 AM »

I never got a response for this. So the Rigrunner will be fused for 40 amps, what should the fuses near the battery be? The same or maybe 50 amps?
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Tim
K0BG
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Posts: 10248


WWW

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« Reply #23 on: October 14, 2015, 11:52:00 AM »

That is determined by the size of the wire, and the load! It pays to remember that the fuses are there to protect the wiring, not the devices powered by the wiring.

And, if the biggest load is fused at 30 amps, then the fuse next to the battery should be the same. But... The wiring from point A to point B should be sized to minimize voltage drop, not the current carrying capacity.

There is one other issue to consider. The fuses the average 100 watt mobile transceiver are 30 amps, although Yaesu uses slow-blow 25 amp fuses. The I2T is about the same in either case. This said, both are really too big, and probably should be 20 amp fuses if one considers the wire size, voltage drop, etc.
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