Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Offbeat Phonetics  (Read 10680 times)
WN4V
Member

Posts: 30




Ignore
« on: October 19, 2015, 07:53:59 AM »

        Is it too much to ask that standard ICAO phonetics be used on the ham bands ? Although hams are not "professionals" by definition, use of ICAO phonetics would reflect positively on amateur radio. I cringe every time I hear made-up phonetics that my toddler niece might come up with. Print out a copy of the ICAO phonetic alphabet and stick it on the wall of your shack. It's no great task to learn it and it would reflect upon your standards as an operator.
Logged
N3QE
Member

Posts: 5593




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2015, 08:00:34 AM »

I was LMAO at "M as in Mancy": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_K_WmV50e7c
Logged
K8PRG
Member

Posts: 310


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2015, 08:01:18 AM »

        Is it too much to ask that standard ICAO phonetics be used on the ham bands ?

I learned them while being trained in CW in the service so I'm with you all the way on this...but in the short time I've been on the air I would say that it is a bit too much to ask.
Logged
KS2G
Member

Posts: 1079




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2015, 08:20:53 AM »

        Is it too much to ask that standard ICAO phonetics be used on the ham bands ?

Not this again.

This subject has been "beaten to death" repeatedly on just about every amateur radio forum on line.

ICAO (ITU) phonetics are fine -- when they work (that is, make clear the callsign being stated),  which they often don't!

In my case, for example, using ICAO "Golf" for the last letter of my callsign often times won't be understood -- but if I switch to "Germany" (sometimes "Guatemala" for South American DX) the receiving op will get it.

Under adverse propagation or crowded-band conditions (e.g. contests) I use whatever works. Wink

Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 1319




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2015, 08:28:56 AM »

ICAO/ITU/NATO phonetics were developed for communications with good signal to noise and strong accents. Many of them have no syllabic redundancy - which serves the same end as Forward Error Correction in digital systems - and have soft, low energy words.

So in high QRM, low SNR situations, (more typical of amateur practice) phonetics with longer words have a better chance of getting through. Messages take longer, though.

Pre WW2, this was understood with Amsterdam, Baltimore, Casablanca alphabet, although Xanthippe for X was hardly a good choice!
Logged
K4PIH
Member

Posts: 11




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2015, 08:36:44 AM »

K4PIH

Kilo 4 Pappa India Hotel

Or as dad used to say

King 4 Peter Ida Henry
Logged
AF7JA
Member

Posts: 285




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2015, 10:16:17 AM »

I teach Excel to 8th graders and I use the standard phonetics. The first few times the students giggle; then they get used to it and  most agree that it is better than just saying the letters. The ones who say it helps the most are the English Language Learner students.

I use the standard ITU (NATO) Phonetic Alphabet. It is on a small poster in my class room (I keep looking for a big poster).
Logged
WA2ISE
Member

Posts: 1294




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2015, 10:19:07 AM »

Obviously poor choices:

"knife psycho one example"
 Grin
Logged
N9FB
Member

Posts: 2388




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: October 19, 2015, 10:57:38 AM »

Obviously poor choices:

"knife psycho one example"
 Grin

or how about

I Steal Everything  Smiley (sorry)

I am thinking about some undesirable vanity calls:

GTH: Go To He _ _

or

BPD: Bad Phonetics Dictionary 

or

RAB: Rockey And Bullwinkle  -- i bet i work a lot of Asian stations using that one (not)

Logged
K8QV
Member

Posts: 79




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2015, 11:35:35 AM »

        Is it too much to ask that standard ICAO phonetics be used on the ham bands ? Although hams are not "professionals" by definition, use of ICAO phonetics would reflect positively on amateur radio. I cringe every time I hear made-up phonetics that my toddler niece might come up with. Print out a copy of the ICAO phonetic alphabet and stick it on the wall of your shack. It's no great task to learn it and it would reflect upon your standards as an operator.

While that sounds reasonable in theory, in practice I have frequently had trouble with "Quebec Victor" but everyone around the world seems to get "Queen Victoria" instantly. Whatever actually works will always supersede "amateur correctness" for me.
Logged
WS4E
Member

Posts: 341




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: October 19, 2015, 11:58:08 AM »

Is there a published version of the common 'extra' phonetics in use on the bands?

Here is what I hear on the bands more than the offical words:

A......AMERICA
B......bravo
C......CANADA
D......DENMARK
E......ENGLAND, Egypt
F......foxtrot
G.....GERMANY
H.....hotel
I.......ITALY
J......JAPAN
K......KILOWATT
L......LONDON
M......MEXICO
N......NORWAY
O......ONTARIO
P......PORTUGAL
Q......QUEBEC, QUEEN
R......RADIO
S......SUGAR
T......TOKYO
U......UNITED
V...... VICTORIA
W......whiskey
X......xray
Y......yankee
Z...... zulu


Frankly some of these actually DO work better than the ICAO ones.
Logged
W5SRT
Member

Posts: 416




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: October 19, 2015, 12:57:19 PM »

The one I dislike the most is kilowatt form "K", because I always write down "KW" and then have to correct it.

LOL

73

- Dan
Logged
DRBEN
Member

Posts: 337




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2015, 04:16:19 PM »

A case can be easily made for uniformity when using phonetic words to communicate letters.

For over 50 years that uniformity has existed in the ITU/NATO/UN/ICAO alphabet. It's phonetics should always be the FIRST choice. In some situations, such has heavy QRN QRM, it may be necessary to repeat a call sign using another letter name or names.

Here's an example from another field. If I call a certain sandwich a "submarine", almost all North American English speakers will know what I'm talking about. If a particular individual or group does not, I can then fall back on one of the less known regional names: hoagie, hero, po'boy, grinder, etc.

In Canada, some letters of the ITU alphabet are part of every combination and permutation of the questions used for the basic ham licence.

If I'm in the hospital emergency room and something needs to be done for me without delay, I expect to hear the doctor say "stat" (a Latin word everyone around him or her will understand). I would not expect to hear ASAP, PDQ, NOW, immediately, on the double, or pronto.

The phonetics we often hear are mostly from the list used by the U.S. military in World War II and from the list used by English speaking telephone operators and Western Union workers back in the old days when you could not directly dial long distance numbers but could end a real telegram that a boy on a bike would hand deliver to your door.
Logged
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 3693




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: October 19, 2015, 04:32:52 PM »

A – as in Aeolian
B – as in Bdellium
C – as in Czar
D – as in Djibouti
E – as in Eight
F – as in Philly
G – as in Gnat
H – as in Heir
I – as in One
J – as in Jalapeño
K – as in Knick-knack
L – as in Fifty – or as in llama
M – as in Mnemonic
N – as in Nguyen
O – as in Oedipus
P – as in Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis
Q – as in Quran
R – as in Are
S – as in Sea
T – as in Tsar
U – as in Uighur
V – as in Five
W – as in Write
X – as in Xylophone
Y – as in Yttrium
Z – as in Zwieback
Logged

73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
K6CPO
Member

Posts: 543




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: October 19, 2015, 04:48:48 PM »

I thought a list based on the Periodic table of the Elements would be fun, but there are no elements that begin with the letters J, Q or W...
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!