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Author Topic: Offbeat Phonetics  (Read 10691 times)
NJ1K
Member

Posts: 3




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« Reply #30 on: October 23, 2015, 05:18:36 AM »

In any case, the ITU requires the ITU/NATO/ICAO alphabet to be used by all radio stations. There is one exception to the rule. "However, stations of the same country, when communicating between themselves, may use any other table recognized by their administration. " (http://life.itu.ch/radioclub/rr/ap14.htm)

As far as I know, the FCC has not officially recognized any other alphabet. Thus because the U.S. is a signatory to the ITU rules, the ITU alphabet is the only one that should be used in normal radiocommunication activities.

The only reference to phonetics that I see in in Part 97 is:

§97.119   Station identification

(a) Each amateur station, except a space station or telecommand station, must transmit its assigned call sign on its transmitting channel at the end of each communication, and at least every 10 minutes during a communication, for the purpose of clearly making the source o
f the transmissions from the station known to those receiving the transmissions...

(2) By a phone emission in the English language. Use of a phonetic alphabet as an aid for correct station identification is encouraged;


Note that is says "a" phonetic alphabet, but does not specify any particular one.


Part 97 does not specify a particular phonetic alphabet. However, the ITU species the ITU/NATO alphabet. Since the U.S. is a signatory to the ITU treaty, the ITU rule is cosidered to be U.S. law.

Article Six, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution provides that the United States Constitution, federal statutes, and TREATIES are "the supreme law of the land."

U.S. courts have ruled that a treaty provision cannot be ignored unless it is in direct conflict with U.S. domestic law. Since Part 97 says "a" rather than "any" phonetic alphabet, the ITU rule complements Part 97 by requiring a specific alphabet; there is no conflict.

So, send the goons to arrest me.  73 de Not Just One Kilowatt.  Ta Ta for now.....
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N7AHE
Member

Posts: 16




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« Reply #31 on: October 23, 2015, 05:58:21 AM »

I thought a list based on the Periodic table of the Elements would be fun, but there are no elements that begin with the letters J, Q or W...

There is W =Tungsten. Just have to find J and Q.
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ND6M
Member

Posts: 848




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« Reply #32 on: October 23, 2015, 06:49:46 AM »

So, send the goons to arrest me.  73 de Not Just One Kilowatt.  Ta Ta for now.....

well the proof is in the pudding,
NJ1KW................... think about it
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KU4UV
Member

Posts: 447




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« Reply #33 on: October 23, 2015, 08:17:45 AM »

I couldn't agree more.  It helps when you have everybody on the same page, but as hams, that just isn't going to happen.  It would be nice if everyone would use the standard phonetics, makes it a lot easier for the person on the other end.  This is especially true when you might be talking to a ham whose first language isn't English to begin with.  My favorite is people who say, "Kilowatt" instead of "Kilo." 

73,
KU4UV
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K4EZD
Member

Posts: 172




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« Reply #34 on: October 23, 2015, 09:34:19 AM »

Quote
My favorite is people who say, "Kilowatt" instead of "Kilo." 
I operate  primarily DX but am limited to a stealth antenna and barefoot power, so at times the DX station cannot copy my call sign.  After giving the standard phonetics twice without success I then try less traditional ones.  I have actually had success using kilowatt when they could not understand kilo, and frequently Denmark for D, England for E, Zanzibar for Z have worked very well when the traditional ones failed.
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 3693




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« Reply #35 on: October 23, 2015, 05:22:13 PM »

"Kilowatt" is ONE word, very common among radio amateurs.  Why anyone would understand it as TWO separate words is a mystery to me.  Since before I was licensed in 1959, hams with a call beginning with the letter K identified with "kilowatt" and very few questioned the practice.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
K7RBW
Member

Posts: 525




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« Reply #36 on: October 23, 2015, 05:31:23 PM »

"Kilowatt" is ONE word, very common among radio amateurs.  Why anyone would understand it as TWO separate words is a mystery to me.  Since before I was licensed in 1959, hams with a call beginning with the letter K identified with "kilowatt" and very few questioned the practice.

Maybe I can help solve the mystery...

Coming into ham radio after using radios for years in the military and aviation, "Kilo", to me, is one word--the phonetic way to refer to the letter "K". So, I hear, "Kilo" "Watt" as two words which I decode as "KW". Try as I might after 20+ years of hamming, I still have to work at remembering that "Kilowatt" just means  "K".
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NJ1K
Member

Posts: 3




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« Reply #37 on: October 23, 2015, 07:05:00 PM »

Really, who cares.  Kilo, kilowatt, Nathan Jonathon one Kalamazoo, who cares.  It's entertaining listening to DX as well as stateside stations trying to decipher the call sign.

 There are so many other things to get really upset about other than phonetics.

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KD2ECF
Member

Posts: 19




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« Reply #38 on: October 23, 2015, 08:06:11 PM »

"Kilowatt" is ONE word, very common among radio amateurs.  Why anyone would understand it as TWO separate words is a mystery to me. 

The reason it causes confusion is because KW is the common abbreviation for kilowatt.

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WA2ISE
Member

Posts: 1294




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« Reply #39 on: October 23, 2015, 08:59:37 PM »


NJ1KW................... think about it

... Kilo whiskey.  I'll drink to that.   Grin
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NQ4T
Member

Posts: 133


WWW

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« Reply #40 on: October 24, 2015, 12:05:45 PM »

The Kilo Mike 4 part of my phonetics gets across pretty easy; the Juliet Oscar Juliet part gets confused with some guys. If they don't understand that...then I'll switch to something like Japan Ocean Japan...or Japan Ontario Japan. I usually make sure I use the standard phonetic at least once before I switch off.

Of course, that does nothing for the guys you're finishing a QSO with who decide to use joke phonetics to "go out on a joke". If I hear one more person tell me to "jump on Juliet"; I don't know what I'm going to do.
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KS2G
Member

Posts: 1081




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« Reply #41 on: October 25, 2015, 04:36:45 AM »

In any case, the ITU requires the ITU/NATO/ICAO alphabet to be used by all radio stations. There is one exception to the rule. "However, stations of the same country, when communicating between themselves, may use any other table recognized by their administration. " (http://life.itu.ch/radioclub/rr/ap14.htm)

As far as I know, the FCC has not officially recognized any other alphabet. Thus because the U.S. is a signatory to the ITU rules, the ITU alphabet is the only one that should be used in normal radiocommunication activities.

The only reference to phonetics that I see in in Part 97 is:

§97.119   Station identification

(a) Each amateur station, except a space station or telecommand station, must transmit its assigned call sign on its transmitting channel at the end of each communication, and at least every 10 minutes during a communication, for the purpose of clearly making the source o
f the transmissions from the station known to those receiving the transmissions...

(2) By a phone emission in the English language. Use of a phonetic alphabet as an aid for correct station identification is encouraged;


Note that is says "a" phonetic alphabet, but does not specify any particular one.


Part 97 does not specify a particular phonetic alphabet. However, the ITU species the ITU/NATO alphabet. Since the U.S. is a signatory to the ITU treaty, the ITU rule is cosidered to be U.S. law.

Article Six, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution provides that the United States Constitution, federal statutes, and TREATIES are "the supreme law of the land."

U.S. courts have ruled that a treaty provision cannot be ignored unless it is in direct conflict with U.S. domestic law. Since Part 97 says "a" rather than "any" phonetic alphabet, the ITU rule complements Part 97 by requiring a specific alphabet; there is no conflict.

All well and good.

But as I said in my initial post -- the ITU/NATO/ICAO alphabet very often just isn't effective under "real world" conditions on the ham bands.

Just listen to any big phone contest -- like this weekend's CQWW-SSB.

You'll hear lots of exchanges in which the receiving station doesn't "get" the callsign transmitted as  ITU/NATO/ICAO but recognizes it just fine with some alternative.
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SWMAN
Member

Posts: 1349




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« Reply #42 on: October 25, 2015, 05:56:36 AM »

"Whiskey Five Juliet Juliet Gulf" has always worked for me.  73  Jim. W5JJG
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WD4CHP
Member

Posts: 217




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« Reply #43 on: October 25, 2015, 08:12:04 AM »

I guess it is force of habit.

I use Whisky Delta Four Charlie Hotel Papa with out thinking and have no problem being understood.

Willis
WD4CHP
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K4BNC
Member

Posts: 39




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« Reply #44 on: October 25, 2015, 08:55:42 AM »

Sounds like nobody in this exchange ever worked KH6BZF - a prime example of unforgettable, non-standard phonetics.
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