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Author Topic: Linux and Wine Windows emulator  (Read 3288 times)
KX4OM
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Posts: 367




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« on: January 23, 2016, 11:30:26 AM »

Wine doesn't handle all Windows applications, some not well and some not at all. There are a few lists on the internet of those that it does; one is at   https://appdb.winehq.org/   Looks like Wine is a favorite of gamers.

I loaded ExpressPCB earlier this week, and it works. I even puts ExpressPCB and ExpressSch shortcuts on my Linux Mint 17.2 Cinnamon desktop automatically. I also loaded DosBox, which is itself an emulator, for some old Dos applications. Many of those apps ran under WindowsXP, but not under Vista or later. One program that I have not gotten to run correctly is RFSim99.

Today, I installed Adobe Photoshop CS2, and it works. I've attached a screenshot of the Mint desktop,with an image file of PCB artwork displayed in Photoshop. It appears large, to show the Mint bar at the bottom. I generally like to do a final edit of PCBs I've made using Eagle, improving clearances and resizing some pads, etc. I also edit board artwork from the 73 Magazine archive online, which are usually scans that don't produce good black and white images. They also need to be resized for doing toner transfer.

Ted, KX4OM

« Last Edit: January 23, 2016, 02:05:59 PM by KX4OM » Logged
N0NB
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Posts: 154


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« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2016, 05:37:22 PM »

It's been several years since I used Wine for GUI apps as I never seemed to be able to get its access to serial ports working satisfactorily.  I used to like running Morse Runner but then I started using Debian amd64 and unless I want to add a lot of 32 bit multi-arch libraries, those older programs no longer run.

I actually do run Wine on a daily basis to generate the MS VC++ support for the Hamlib daily snapshot which is run in a 32 bit installation of Debian Jessie running in Virtual Box on my amd64 Debian Jessie installation!  It actually works rather well and was kind of a geeky thing to set up which is probably why I did it in the first place.   Wink  Running Morse Runner under the VM Jessie didn't work so well as the sound was rather choppy.

For those that benefit from it, Wine is a nice piece of software.
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73, de Nate
Bremen, KS

SKCC 6225
N7EKU
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Posts: 1044




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« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2016, 06:03:42 PM »

Hi,

I've found that PlayOnLinux is a better way to use Wine in Linux.  This package helps you manage your Wine installation.  It has automatic installation routines for many Windows games and productivity programs.  It also lets you set up specific Wine versions for programs that need older Wine versions (e.g. Elsie).  Winetricks is another good helper for Wine, but I find PlayOnLinux to be even better.

73,


Mark.
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Mark -- N7EKU/VE3
KX4OM
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Posts: 367




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« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2016, 06:40:56 PM »

Thanks for the info, Mark. I used Winetricks to install some Windows-related configuration stuff that had me stumped originally. Some missing MS True Type Fonts would halt the startup of my original installation of Photoshop CS2 (after I had run it successfully it to make the screenshot above.) I used that experience to get RFSim99 working today. I'll set up PlayOnLinux. I have Elsie on the WinXP VM, and it would be good to get it into Wine, as Winetricks is sort of obtuse. 

Next thing to try will be the EMRFD Ladpac suite of programs that are running on XP in the VM. Then, a good test will be to see if I can install the same (earlier) version of the DotNet framework that I run in Vista that works with the obsolete 32-bit Paint.Net graphic editor. Newer versions of that program require 64-bit hardware and 64-bit DotNet framework. I use Paint.Net for highlighting lines with semitransparency and when I need to do a lot of repetitive cut-and-pastes for schematic enhancement for some of my boatanchors. It has a much quicker workflow for those tasks than Photoshop or Gimp.

Ted
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K4FMH
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Posts: 513




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« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2016, 07:21:51 AM »

Good stuff here, OMs! I have not yet tried PlayOnLinux. But I bought codeweavers' CrossOver fir Linux for my Linux Mint machines. It works well...for applications it supports...and a few it doesn't. Compilation in Visual Basic can give it trouble. HRD, for instance, just won't install and execute. Does playonlinux handle hrd? If so, it will draw many hams. I dint use hrd but prefer log4om instead. If you try installing hrd under playonlinuc, please report your experience back to this thread, ok?

73,

Frank
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