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Author Topic: As spotted on the cluster last night...  (Read 93 times)
WB9LUR
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« on: Today at 03:47:03 PM »

Saw an ATNO spotted last night and quickly dialed up the frequency. He had a strong signal and was working 'em fast. In fact, he sounded too strong for band conditions but hey - prop can be very selective and unpredictable right?

While listening for a pattern before jumping in with my call - I hear the "DX" drop his call, "de WXXXX". What? A U.S. call? I checked the cluster spot - now there were even more spots for the same ATNO - and I was on the spotted frequency...

Drops his call again. Two times in just a few minutes. This wasn't any DX at all - it was a stateside ham working a pileup - contest style.  Apparently, this "DX" had been spotted and folks were tuning in and working him without really listening - then adding their own new spot with the wrong call. Error on top of error. OK, I get it, work 'em first and worry later. In this case listening after the "Q" to confirm the call sign might have been advisable.

I have no idea if this was a mistakenly spotted call or if the real DX went QRT after being spotted or what. Glad that he did ID or I might have "worked" the DX too!



Randy / WB9LUR
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73, Randy / WB9LUR - http://www.CallingDX.com

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NI0C
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« Reply #1 on: Today at 04:31:15 PM »

Quote from an eHam article that I posted back in 2006:

"I’m connected to the cluster and I see a spot for a country or band-zone that I need. What do I do? A spot is not an invitation to transmit! The first thing I do is to QSY my rig to the spot frequency and then listen. This is not a time to say Heloooo Radiooo or send carriers or question marks on CW or to blow into the microphone, or send QRL’s or ask if the frequency is in use. The spot is an indication that the frequency is or (was very recently) in use. Until I hear and positively identify the DX station and know that he or she is standing by for calls, any transmission by me on the frequency is simply QRM. If I can’t hear the DX, maybe they QRT, maybe they did a QSY, maybe they asked the pileup to stand by, or maybe propagation just isn’t in my favor. It is my job to try to find out, but I do that by listening, not transmitting. "

73 de Chuck  NI0C
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WO7R
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« Reply #2 on: Today at 05:26:37 PM »

This happens to me about once a day.

Stale cluster spots, news at 11.
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AA6YQ
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« Reply #3 on: Today at 05:48:07 PM »

Quote from an eHam article that I posted back in 2006:

"I’m connected to the cluster and I see a spot for a country or band-zone that I need. What do I do? A spot is not an invitation to transmit! The first thing I do is to QSY my rig to the spot frequency and then listen. This is not a time to say Heloooo Radiooo or send carriers or question marks on CW or to blow into the microphone, or send QRL’s or ask if the frequency is in use. The spot is an indication that the frequency is or (was very recently) in use. Until I hear and positively identify the DX station and know that he or she is standing by for calls, any transmission by me on the frequency is simply QRM. If I can’t hear the DX, maybe they QRT, maybe they did a QSY, maybe they asked the pileup to stand by, or maybe propagation just isn’t in my favor. It is my job to try to find out, but I do that by listening, not transmitting. "


Well said, Chuck.

Knowledge of propagation can sometimes save you the time spent listening for the callsign. Obviously you're not going to work a VU on 80m at 2 pm your time, whether the callsign is accurately spotted or not; a propagation forecast can reveal whether a 20m spot is possibly worth your time.
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