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Author Topic: Network Interference  (Read 4533 times)
JSKJJ73
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Posts: 3




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« on: April 21, 2016, 11:18:11 AM »

First of all I'd like to say that this is my first post here. That being said, here is my issue:

My station is located near a Linksys wireless router which feeds the station and house. When the main network cable is connected, it seems to act as an antenna, wreaking havoc on the 2 meter band (and possibly others). I was told to use Ferrite chokes, I only had a couple in my junk box but gave it a shot, no affect at all. I'm assuming I need particular ones but not sure which. Please note I've been a ham for less than a year, but have a great deal of experience with computer networks. Relocating the router is not an option. The WiFi itself doesn't seem to be causing the problem, but more the router's electronics. Anybody else ever have this issue? If so, was a solution found? Thanks in advance.
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KC2MMI
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Posts: 831




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« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2016, 11:54:37 AM »

Had a similar issue maybe ten years ago. Even tried putting the router in a cookie tin (aka faraday cage) to suppress the noise. Didn't work because so much was being carried out on the power wires. Linksys said "no longer under warranty, not our problem" and the FCC said "You own it? Your job to turn it off." and everyone ignored the fact that the Part15 certification had either been fraudulently obtained, or the device had been changed in between then and actual sales. (There were obvious changes in the components versus the board screening.)

So...Knowing that neither Linksys nor the FCC gives a damn? Good luck with the chokes, they might work for you, but I think a new router is in your future. Might be a good opportunity to upgrade to a faster type.

I know that Cisco bought Linksys somewhere along the line so in theory there's new management, but I'll still never buy another Linksys product.
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JSKJJ73
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« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2016, 12:05:47 PM »

Is there a non-disruptive router that you can recommend? I need good WiFi range to cover my area. Thanks.
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N5EG
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Posts: 330


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« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2016, 12:15:55 PM »

What kind of wired Ethernet interface does your wifi access point / router have?

The 100 Mb/s ones seem to me noisier than the 1GE interfaces.

I've successfully quieted down 100Mbs interfaces by using shielded Cat5e or Cat6 cable.
Your router should have metal flashing around the Ethernet connector (the shield connects to it).
Have not noticed much problem with 1GE.  The Ethernet Jack usually has common mode chokes
built inside it, so external common mode chokes don't help much.

1GE devices have become quite inexpensive, however both ends of the cable have to
be plugged into 1GE devices, or else the interface will auto negotiate down to 100M, or
even 10M.

-- Tom, N5EG
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JSKJJ73
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Posts: 3




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« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2016, 12:59:09 PM »

It's 100MBs, I would have to buy two 1GE's. One connects to the modem close to my station, a single network cable connects it to a wireless access point to carry the signal into the house. Would all the wireless devices in use also have to support this speed?

When I unplug the cable from either end, the noise vanishes, so I'm convinced the noise from the router is being carried along the Cat 5e line. External chokes that I had dampened it a little, but not enough to matter.
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N5EG
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« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2016, 01:37:09 PM »

Hi John -

When you unplug the cable, the Ethernet link goes down, it stops signaling (thus stops making noise).
You can't use this to debug the problem.

With an Ethernet switch, each port selects it's own speed according to what is plugged into it.
Different ports on the same switch can be running at different speeds.

The wireless devices themselves don't care about the speed of the electrical interface
on the router or access point, they'll run whatever RF speed they can.

-- Tom, N5EG





« Last Edit: April 21, 2016, 02:05:30 PM by N5EG » Logged
WB4SPT
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Posts: 686




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« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2016, 03:34:53 PM »

My Asus router is quiet near my uhf and vhf.  I have had issues with other brands.
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KY6M
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Posts: 128




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« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2016, 08:46:52 AM »

I have a TP-LINK, zero noise. On a previous router I had noise on one of the long runs of LAN cable to my ham radio computer so I wound the CAT 5 cable around a large toroid core (maybe 1 or 1.5 inch) 10 times on both ends and eliminated the noise (but that was on HF).
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KC3BBI
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Posts: 77




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« Reply #8 on: May 19, 2016, 09:48:54 PM »

There is major differences in Ethernet cable. I would attempt to replace the cat 5 with shielded cat 6 cable and also run the cable through the ferite beads of the appropritate mix type. http://kf7p.com/KF7P/Ferrite_chokes.html
The link should help to find something you need.
http://palomar-engineers.com/rfi-kits/computer-rfi-kits Specifically this one shows a cure for the RF issues from the router.
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KC1BMD
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Posts: 838




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« Reply #9 on: May 25, 2016, 03:56:46 AM »

No noise problems with my Asus routers (one main in basement, one access point on 1st floor and shack on 2nd floor). Some TP-Link power line Ethernet modules produce noise but it seems they notched for the ham bands Smiley.
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