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Author Topic: Linux/Win 10  (Read 8688 times)
W0DLM
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Posts: 178




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« on: July 01, 2016, 07:28:56 AM »

Setting up a new home computer soon. I use linux (RHEL) at work. I want to be able to run both Linux (probably Mint) and Win 10 on the new computer. So looking for opinions on the best setup...

1. Linux with Win10 running in VirtualBox
2. Win10 with Linux running in VirtualBox
3. Dual boot
4. Something else?
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KK4GGL
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« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2016, 08:07:19 AM »

I don't know about advice, but I can tell you what I do.
On my main computer I dual boot Opensuse Leap and Vista, but I also have XP VMs inside Suse.. I rarely boot Vista except to install any updates that might be floating around.
On my backup computer I dual boot XP and Debian Testing, also with a couple of VMs inside Debian.
If you are using RHEL at work, wha are you not considering one of the Red Hat derivatives?
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73,
Rick KK4GGL
G4AON
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« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2016, 08:32:05 AM »

I run Oracle Virtual Box under Win 10 64 bit. In V/B I have 32 bit Windows XP for a few legacy programs... From clicking "go", XP is up and running in around 25 seconds, I notice no interaction or any conflict between the two systems. XP runs very fast. You might need the extension pack in order to run serial ports (it's free). I isolate XP from the outside world and only share files via a named USB memory stick. I don't update XP or use A/V with it.

It helps to have dual monitors, I usually have XP on the left and Win 10 on the right, switching is by moving the mouse pointer to the other screen.

Highly recommended and best of all, it's free!

73 Dave
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WW7KE
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« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2016, 08:38:54 AM »

You'll have disk partitioning issues if you're going to dual-boot, so I recommend running Linux in a virtual machine (I take it you have 8 Gb RAM or more). 

But if you already use Red Hat at work, why not run CentOS at home, since you already know RHEL?  Other than branding, they're identical.
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He speaks fluent PSK31, in FT8...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
AC7CW
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« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2016, 04:08:59 PM »

perhaps you can run mint from a thumb drive?
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Novice 1958, 20WPM Extra now... (and get off my lawn)
VK6IS
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« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2016, 06:55:46 PM »

run the Linux in a VB, for the short term,
- assuming that your new machine has at least 8Gb of ram.

then, depending on the HDD partitioning layout,
you can go for a long term approach,  with a dual boot.

so - if the HDDs partitioning layout is with GPT,
then it's somewhat straightforward to add 2 - 3 extra partitions.

you’ll may have to turn off secure boot,
but still be able to use UEFI mode.
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KK4GGL
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« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2016, 04:49:41 AM »

You can also add a second HD and dual boot. No need to partition the first drive.
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Rick KK4GGL
KX4OM
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« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2016, 11:43:32 AM »

For a dual boot setup, the general recommendation on Linux forums is to install Windows 10 first. Once it is set up, install Linux. That way the grub bootloader (assuming you are installing Mint; some distros don't use grub) will see the Windows installation. When you start the computer, the Linux boot option will appear at the top of the list.

I have that exact setup on this laptop, with Mint 17.3 Mate. I have other OSes running in VirtualBox VMs on Linux. I use VMs to experiment with other Linux distros, one for legacy apps on an WinXP SP3 VM, and I've also done a VM of DOS 6.22.

Ted, KX4OM
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W0BTU
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« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2016, 09:05:47 PM »

You can also add a second HD and dual boot. No need to partition the first drive.

I thought that would work with Windows 7. I added another drive and installed Linux Mint MATE 17.3 on it. However, at some point, Windows decided that the boot sector on the Linux HD should be trashed. :-(

I'm fed up with Microsoft. We're eliminating Windows here. Period!
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K5UNX
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« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2016, 10:08:15 AM »

Dual boot or Virtual machines? Hard to say which is best given your situation. But I can provide some thoughts.

Dual-boot - I have never been a fan. Always needed something in the OS I wasn't running. That said, I got a new job recently and am running a Linux laptop for work. It's going to be dual boot and have about 20 VM's. The main OS is alpha code so it's no production stable. The other OS will be a safety net, production stable OS. If you do decide dual boot, like some others have said, install Windows first, then Linux. This makes the disk partitioning and boot loader config much easier.

Host OS + VM's - I like this scenario better. You can run two or more OS's at the same time. Which one is the host and which is the VM?? Well first ask yoursefl one question.

Which OS will you spend the most time in? Use the most?  - - Whatever the answer is, use that one as the Host OS and put the other in a VM.

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W0BTU
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« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2016, 11:12:03 AM »

Windows in a virtual machine might have prevented the trashed Linux LVM drive (as I described earlier).
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