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Author Topic: 160 mobile range  (Read 6520 times)
WA9CFK
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Posts: 214




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« on: December 31, 2016, 07:17:42 PM »

I have run mobile on 40 and 80 meters and have had coverage over several states, perhaps 250 to 300 miles. Nothing fancy, just 100 watts into an old Hustler antenna mounted to the bumper of my pick up.

I am going to build a similar center loaded 9 ft antenna for 160 m and wonder if the coverage would be about the same.

What do you 160 mobile folks consider the normal area of coverage.
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KB4QAA
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« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2016, 10:56:17 PM »

The range would be about the same.

Now there are darned few people who work 160m mobile.
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KA0HCP, ex-KB4QAA Relocated to Ks. April 2019.
ONAIR
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« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2017, 02:10:48 AM »

Saw a trucker once who worked 160 meter mobile.  He had an antenna that stretched from the front to the back of his trailer!
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W8JX
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« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2017, 04:19:50 AM »

I have run mobile on 40 and 80 meters and have had coverage over several states, perhaps 250 to 300 miles. Nothing fancy, just 100 watts into an old Hustler antenna mounted to the bumper of my pick up.

I worked a lot of 40m mobile in past with hamstick type antennas on a bumper mount with a Kenwood TS-140 and got good range. Even worked down under a few times in morning going to work continuing a chat started from home rig. Daytime norm was 500 miles or more and at night well over 1500. I even worked Hawaii once on 40 while mobile at night while in Colorado on vacation. Never had much luck on 80m mobile. Bandwidth was very limited and efficiency was lower yet and best I did was 500 miles or so at night but signals were weak. Spent 98% of time on 40 or 20m
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Ham since 1969....  Old School 20wpm REAL Extra Class..
K5LXP
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« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2017, 08:19:08 AM »

"Back in the day" 160M was a mobile band.  In old magazines you read about long bumper mounted whips, large loading coils and running AM.  Receive was done by tweaking the broadast radio up into the ham band.  I doubt this was for working grayline into europe, rather it was a way to keep in touch while driving around town but it worked well enough for that.

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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MM0TWX
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Posts: 7




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« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2017, 08:58:57 AM »

As a matter of curiosity, I remember a feature article on CQ Magazine, years ago, about somebody who had worked 160m DXCC from the mobile! I remember a white pickup van with a relatively ordinary centre-loaded mobile antenna, and 500 watts.
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KB4QAA
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« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2017, 02:05:34 PM »

If you are lucky you might catch Tim-tron WA1HLR on the air (AM) in his Cadaverlac!  I've heard him once on 80m.  Note the size of his loading coil!  Antenna parts get very bit on 160m.


« Last Edit: January 01, 2017, 02:08:27 PM by KB4QAA » Logged

KA0HCP, ex-KB4QAA Relocated to Ks. April 2019.
W4FID
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Posts: 233




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« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2017, 03:12:53 AM »

I had a dynamotor powered 160 AM rig built from TV tubes in an industrial size J&J band aid can. Ran about 5 watts out. Had a CB whip and varnished Quaker Oats cardboard form for the loading coil. And a 12 V car battery. Used a detuned 6 transistor radio as the receiver. On my old heavy Schwinn balloon tire bicycle. All I had to do to make a turn was lean a little and the inertia did the rest! I was too young for a driver's license. Worked fixed stations in about a 15 or so mile radius. Mobile to mobile was VERY local only. As much fun as a 14 year old geek could possibly have. There was a group of 160 meter guys in Chicago and we even did fox hunts on 160 once a month. 1805 was for fixed station and 1810 was for mobiles. But that was 50 years ago. More recently I had a nice HF rig in my pick up and enjoyed 75 meter SSB but the bandwidth of the hamstick was very narrow so I was limited to the freq I could work. 160 would be even more so. No doubt that's why we were all on one freq for 160 meter operation "back in the day"
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NO2A
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« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2017, 02:41:58 PM »

Your bandwidth will be very narrow on 160m. You might want to use one frequency and tweak it for swr. How much power will actually get to the antenna? They say Hamsticks are terribly inefficient on 80m,for 100 watts in you may get a watt output. I can only imagine on 160m. I applaud anyone for trying on that band. It would be great working someone mobile.
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W4KYR
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Posts: 1803




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« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2017, 11:35:51 PM »

Your bandwidth will be very narrow on 160m. You might want to use one frequency and tweak it for swr. How much power will actually get to the antenna? They say Hamsticks are terribly inefficient on 80m,for 100 watts in you may get a watt output. I can only imagine on 160m. I applaud anyone for trying on that band. It would be great working someone mobile.

Many years ago the old police band used to start at 1600 khz and up just above the old AM broadcast band. I wonder what power they used and how far they got. I assume they used whip antennas and loading coils.


http://forums.radioreference.com/general-scanning-discussion/280497-1-73mhz.html


Quote
The old police MW band was 1600 to just above 2500 kHz (some locations licensed as high as 3200 kHz, but I don’t find records of operation that high). This was initially one way, from station to police car, to respond the mobile unit would have to stop at a call box. Later some systems used MF station-to-car and VHF car-to-station. As late as 1964 LAPD was still dispatching on 1700 kHz (according to Electric Radio #169, June 2003).


There must be pictures out there on the web of those old car to station units. Maybe there is an antenna and coil diagram that we could adopt for ham radio.

160 meter mobile antenna

By the way several years ago, Valor sold a 160 meter mobile antenna. The Valor Pro-Am 160 meter center-loaded mobile whip (PHF-160B) sold for about $70.  It had quality control issues according to one reviewer, another used it with no problem and another used on his mobile home roof!.

http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/706

It looked like this





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The internet and cellphone networks are great until they go down, what then? Find out here. 
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Using Windows 98 For Packet...
KC7YE
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Posts: 25




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« Reply #10 on: January 12, 2017, 07:50:21 AM »

Long ago, in the dim past 160 AM mobile was "the" ECOM choice. 50 -60 miles with solid copy. Never had 160 mobile rig but did ride along with W7UGK (SK) when we went out to monitor Snohomish & Skykomish Rivers flood levels when local ecom net was activated. County never sent out an op alone for safety. That function now automated on dedicated UHF feed.
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