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Author Topic: 811A Socket=Loose pin contacts--how to fix? Tighten up?  (Read 4062 times)
N6QWP
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Posts: 778




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« on: April 29, 2017, 07:02:19 AM »

Looking for an experienced solution to tightening up the pin contacts on 811A tube sockets--without cracking the porcelain bases.  Anyone come up with a way to safely save these sockets once they become loose?  Would like to avoid having to replace them.  Practical experiences appreciated.

I asked this question at the end of another long thread, but guess it is buried (and not the main topic, there)....so was not getting any responses.

Using a small screwdriver?  Awl?  Nose pliers?  Solder?  Any ideas?  From above or below the chassis?  (From the tube side would be the most accessible--and likely to cause cracks in the base).
« Last Edit: April 29, 2017, 07:17:35 AM by N6QWP » Logged
N6QWP
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« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2017, 09:30:55 AM »

 OBVIOUSLY, THIS WOULD APPLY TO 572B AMPS AS WELL. Roll Eyes
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K8AXW
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« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2017, 10:38:40 AM »

I would first acquire a new socket, just in case.  Then I would try to tighten up the socket by squeezing the pin slightly.  Then I would clean the pin inside with a good contact cleaner and swab just in case the problem of poor contact was caused by corrosion or heat.

If the pin problem was caused by excessive heat, you can bet that you will eventually need the new socket.  IMHO.
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A Pessimist is Never Disappointed!
N6QWP
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« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2017, 11:20:13 AM »

Would you be trying to squeeze them from the bottom.....or trying to pry them closer from the top?

I'll be looking for new replacement sockets.  In the meantime, I'd like to try to salvage what is in there.  Thanx
« Last Edit: April 29, 2017, 11:22:15 AM by N6QWP » Logged
W1BR
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Posts: 4196




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« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2017, 11:27:46 AM »

There are  dental cleaning tools that can be used to apply lateral pressure between the outer side of the contact and ceramic socket wall. I've had luck retensioning octal and other sockets.  The dental tools are SS, and can be snapped if too much pressure is needed.  Cheap imported sockets are known to lose tension after a few years of use.
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KC4ZGP
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Posts: 1961




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« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2017, 11:32:00 AM »

Solder them into their sockets.

And when you have to replace one, make it a nice Sunday afternooon event with the whole family.

73 and wear your seat belt.

Kraus
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G3RZP
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« Reply #6 on: April 29, 2017, 03:26:38 PM »

Change the sockets. I know it is expensive - it cost me $6 at Dayton for 4 new sockets for a 30L1. I could have 2 or even 3 beers for that, although better was to visit Lou, W1QJ, and get a YuengLing from him for nothing!

You going to be there this year, Lou?
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N6QWP
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« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2017, 03:56:13 PM »

Trying to find some American sockets.....Everything online appears to be Chinese.  Not going to be able to buy at anywhere near the deal that you found....but persistence can pay in the end.....one way or the other.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2017, 03:59:04 PM by N6QWP » Logged
G3RZP
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« Reply #8 on: April 29, 2017, 04:03:04 PM »

They were the same type as the 30L1, but country of manufacture unknown. But good quality. Can't remember who the supplier was, but it was in the fleamarket....
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WA7PRC
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« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2017, 04:10:28 PM »

When the 3-500Z filament pins in my SB-220 overheated and the socket terminal tensioners failed, rather than try to make them work again, I just replaced the sockets. It was neither difficult nor expensive. With 811s having fewer pins and using less expensive sockets, I'd recommend the same. The ONLY time I'd recommend fiddling with old parts is when new parts are unavailable or yuuugely expensive.
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G3RZP
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« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2017, 04:14:58 PM »

7PRC,

I'd go along with that....

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VK3BL
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« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2017, 05:55:57 AM »

Replace the sockets.

Over time, the heating and cooling cycles anneals the spring steel, making for a poor connection.  No matter what you do (aside from reprocessing), you cannot restore the temper of the spring steel.

They're not expensive, and country of origin shouldn't be an issue for all but vintage gear perfectionists.
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J.D. Mitchell BA  - VK3BL / XU7AGA - https://www.youtube.com/ratemyradio - Honesty & Integrity
AA4HA
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« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2017, 01:48:05 PM »

Replace the sockets.
Completely agree, for the exact reasons stated.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
KH6AQ
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« Reply #13 on: April 30, 2017, 01:50:32 PM »

Your amp is saying "socket to me!"
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KB2WIG
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« Reply #14 on: April 30, 2017, 02:20:42 PM »



Verry interesting.


klc
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EXTRALight  1/3 less WPM than a Real EXTRA
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