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Author Topic: reading the exam  (Read 5240 times)
KD5RYO
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« on: July 11, 2017, 08:09:56 AM »

A little backstory:

My son is currently 6 years old and will be 7 in October.  He operates on the radio and builds electronic things with me pretty regularly.  He's learned quite a lot about radio and math, including some Morse code.  He asked me if he could get his own license and I didn't realize how much he had absorbed until I started reading some of the tech questions to him.  I believe with a little study, he'd have a good shot at passing the test.

The issue is the speed at which he reads.  He's reading at a high level for his age, reading some kids and preteen novels, but he doesn't read them quickly.  I told him he would probably have to wait until he could read the exam fully in a timely manner before taking it.  At that point, he asked me if I could read the exam to him or have a VEC do it so that he could just choose the answers.

I still insisted that he continue to operate with me and take the test when he could read it quickly enough but it was a question I had never thought of before.  Is it permissible to read the questions and answers on the exam to someone taking the test?  I know blind hams and I've heard of children as young as 5 or 6 being licensed but now I'm curious how the exam was administered to them.

Thanks and 73!
cmh
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W3HF
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« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2017, 08:55:06 AM »

Reading per se is not a requirement for a license, nor is reading speed. I'd suggest contacting a local VE team and see what they would offer to accommodate him. They might be willing to have an extra-long session (if he's able to read all the questions and answers given enough time) or they might be willing to read the questions and answers to him (similar to a blind person).

Our VE team has never (to my knowledge) dealt with someone that young. My son was 9 when he took his first test, so he was clearly able to read the test himself. But our team provided a dedicated two-VE team to assist a blind candidate (one reading, one writing out the answer sheet, and the first confirming that the second had properly marked the answer selected by the candidate). I'm sure we would do the same thing for young person who couldn't read. (Though it's probably an 1100-mile trip for you to our test site in Lansdale PA!)
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KD5RYO
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« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2017, 09:09:05 AM »

Thanks for the reply!

I'd suggest contacting a local VE team and see what they would offer to accommodate him. They might be willing to have an extra-long session (if he's able to read all the questions and answers given enough time) or they might be willing to read the questions and answers to him (similar to a blind person).

Along with this post, I also wrote the VEC who was present when I re-took the tech test this time around.  He's capable of reading the questions but certainly not as fast as everyone else.  That was sort of my main concern and I didn't want to put anyone out.

But our team provided a dedicated two-VE team to assist a blind candidate (one reading, one writing out the answer sheet, and the first confirming that the second had properly marked the answer selected by the candidate).

I assumed it would have to be a setup like this for the blind.  Otherwise, I figured it'd be some sort of text to speech with an electronic exam.

I'm sure we would do the same thing for young person who couldn't read. (Though it's probably an 1100-mile trip for you to our test site in Lansdale PA!)

Sounds like an excuse for a road trip to me!  Grin
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K2OWK
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« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2017, 03:36:15 PM »

I am a VE and as far as I know there is no time limit on taking the exam. We do not end the exam until all testers are finished.

73s

K2OWK
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KC4ZGP
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« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2017, 03:41:25 PM »


And don't forget the beer.

Kraus
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K6CPO
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« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2017, 04:12:52 PM »

The youngest person I have tested as a VE Team leader was nine years old.  i would have no qualms testing someone younger than that, but I would NOT let the parent read the examination to the child.  I think there'd be too much temptation for the parent to coach the child. If that were necessary, it would be a qualified VE reading to the child.

I once had an adult with cerebral palsy come in to take the general exam.  He had trouble reading the exam so I sat a trusted VE down with him to read and mark the examination for him.  He passed.
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KD5RYO
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« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2017, 06:07:30 PM »

i would have no qualms testing someone younger than that, but I would NOT let the parent read the examination to the child.  I think there'd be too much temptation for the parent to coach the child. If that were necessary, it would be a qualified VE reading to the child.

I don't think it'd be a good idea for the parent to read the exam to the child, either.  I was thinking more along the lines of a VE reading it as well.
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KD5RYO
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« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2017, 06:07:56 PM »


And don't forget the beer.

Kraus

6 is a little young for a beer!  Cheesy
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K7KBN
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« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2017, 09:27:51 PM »

Chateau Budlite
Mise en bouteille just last week.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
KB9ZB
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« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2017, 04:33:48 AM »

We have given exams to 9 and 10 year old kids, no problem. We also have read exams to kids and adults who have reading issues. The rules are to accommodate and we are more than happy to read an exam. sometimes that is all it takes to see another ham and a happy face!!
Ron
KB9ZB
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AA8TA
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« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2017, 03:53:11 PM »

Interesting question.  How slow is slow?  Is he slowly sounding out the words in his head but otherwise grasps the meaning?

How about trying an experiment: there are practice sites, for example QRZ.com and others, where he could take a test.  Or, find one where you can print out, say, 10 questions with the multiple choices, then have the kid take the test and see how much time he takes.  Triple a 10-question practice exam and you'll be close to 35 question real exam.

I'm a VE and if you told me in advance that your kid is slow at reading but can otherwise handle the test, I would let him take whatever time he needs.  Of course, 2 other VEs also have to agree.

Unless he is going to need a few hours, he should be OK.
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TU es 73 de Joe AA8TA
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