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Author Topic: "Burning in" tubes?  (Read 42594 times)
KM4AH
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Posts: 963




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« Reply #90 on: September 25, 2017, 02:19:45 PM »

Even with the easier requirements ham radio is a shadow of what it was back when I got in to it.

Serious questions:

When did you get into it?

How is it "a shadow of what it was"?

1985

And, I am talking about the number of hams actually on the air at any given time. I know more dead hams than live ones.
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N2EY
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Posts: 5096




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« Reply #91 on: September 25, 2017, 06:04:35 PM »

Even with the easier requirements ham radio is a shadow of what it was back when I got in to it.

Serious questions:

When did you get into it?

How is it "a shadow of what it was"?

1985

And, I am talking about the number of hams actually on the air at any given time. I know more dead hams than live ones.

What bands and modes do you use?

---

Think about all that has changed in 32 years.....

In 1985, the repeater boom was in full swting. Cell phones and PCs were in their infancy. So was the online universe.

Being able to communicate from your car, or a hand-held device, was still revolutionary at the time. Only hams had cool stuff like auto-patch. Being able to chat while driving made long commutes less boring, and in the event of an emergency - experienced or seen - we could call for help.

Now the situation is completely different. EVERYONE has a cell phone, email, an online presence. If you see an accident, by the time you can bring up the autopatch, three other people have already called 911. Texting lets us communicate without requiring the immediate attention of others - and we can text to groups.

In fact the problem today is getting people to NOT text and have phone calls while driving!

I used to be a regular on 2 meters from the mobile - and then I got a new vehicle, a shorter commute, and a cell phone. No more mobile operation for me - the car became one of the few places I could be isolated! ("I couldn't answer your call because I was driving").

You're looking at one of the other factors. The online environment requires no antennas, no specialized equipment, no RFI/EMI issues. And you can use the computer for many other things.

On top of all that, we have email (which is effective free for most of us) and long-distance calling which is free, or nearly so.

The main reason to do amateur radio today is "radio for its own sake".

And....if you know more dead hams than live ones - get on the air and meet some more. Try new bands and modes. Build something. Do different things.

Upgrade to Extra...

73 de Jim, N2EY
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N2EY
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Posts: 5096




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« Reply #92 on: September 25, 2017, 06:16:01 PM »

I wonder why they used to publish the Bash books then? Maybe so people could actually pass the older tests? And why is that any different then today, other than the questions and answers are official?

If you want to complain about the current system, then you also need to condemn the older system as well. Otherwise your condemnation is simply a personal opinion not based on any facts. Other than those you make up along the way to win an argument.

Ahhhh...... good point, Mr. Bash was not very well taken by many hams since basically his motive was to compile a study guide full of "verbatim" questions that appeared on the exam pools. 

And make $$$ doing so. His books sold for $20 back then. An ARRL License Manual was.....$3.


 
The question pool in today's study guides contain all the "verbatim" questions and is EXACTLY what Bash tried to do back then. 

Tried and succeeded.

Unfortunately we forget one major stumbling block that even Bash couldn't do anything about and that was a 20 WPM code exam.  No way around it.   Some of today's hams are still hams prior to Bash.  They did not have "Bash Crash Books" and the only study guide was the ARRL publication.  It was a very thin book with sample questions.  There was a good explanation of theory behind the sample questions which provoked insight rather than "spoon feeding". 

There were study guides by others. Ameco was one. But a License Manual was cheaper.

There are still hams that passed a written test on this basis of study and did the code test where you had to have one minute of solid copy.  To add to the complexity of obtaining the license there was no credit given for passing either element of the test.  You had to pass both CODE and WRITTEN in the same sitting.  In fact you were given the code test first, if you missed it, you did not get to take the written.  You had to go home and WAIT 30 days before you can retest.  The killer was if you passed the code and failed the written, you had to pass the code again.  This is frustrating to say the least but yet, many hams endured.  I can't say I really blame some of the older fellas for feeling the hobby has been thumbed down. 

I don't think Amateur Radio has been "dumbed down". What has changed is the entry requirements. Can't blame the newcomers for that!

And a lot of newcomers I encounter really want to learn and understand the material - they don't just want to pass the test and forget everything.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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W9FIB
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Posts: 2531




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« Reply #93 on: September 25, 2017, 06:45:36 PM »

I don't think Amateur Radio has been "dumbed down". What has changed is the entry requirements. Can't blame the newcomers for that!

And a lot of newcomers I encounter really want to learn and understand the material - they don't just want to pass the test and forget everything.

73 de Jim, N2EY

In an awkward way, that was my point. Thanks Jim for stating it in a better choice of words.
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73, Stan
Wisdom is knowledge you gain after you know it all.
N0YXB
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Posts: 1560




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« Reply #94 on: September 25, 2017, 09:06:59 PM »


I don't think Amateur Radio has been "dumbed down". What has changed is the entry requirements. Can't blame the newcomers for that!

And a lot of newcomers I encounter really want to learn and understand the material - they don't just want to pass the test and forget everything.

73 de Jim, N2EY

Totally agree. And many have a tendency to believe that everything is easier for those who come after us. 

"You think your boot camp was hard? Well in my day..."
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 5096




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« Reply #95 on: September 26, 2017, 05:01:56 AM »


I don't think Amateur Radio has been "dumbed down". What has changed is the entry requirements. Can't blame the newcomers for that!

And a lot of newcomers I encounter really want to learn and understand the material - they don't just want to pass the test and forget everything.

73 de Jim, N2EY

Totally agree. And many have a tendency to believe that everything is easier for those who come after us. 

"You think your boot camp was hard? Well in my day..."

Four Yorkshiremen syndrome:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xe1a1wHxTyo
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KM4AH
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Posts: 963




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« Reply #96 on: September 27, 2017, 09:13:25 AM »

Quote
Upgrade to Extra...


Nah. I have the only class of license that proves you actually know code.
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 7042




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« Reply #97 on: September 27, 2017, 10:03:28 AM »

Quote
I don't think Amateur Radio has been "dumbed down". What has changed is the entry requirements. Can't blame the newcomers for that!

I've been avoiding reading this thread....for a number of reasons, but checked this last page to see what was going on NOW.

I read the above quote, and I mean no offense; please believe me, and I almost choked.

First of all amateur radio cannot be "dumbed down."  Physics, electronics and mathematics cannot be "dumbed down."  OK?

What has been dumbed down are the "entry requirements" as stated above and the statement "You can't blame the newcomers for that." These statements are absolutely correct.

When the term "dumbed down" is used it REFERS to the entry requirements!  This is what old timers, old farts or whatever term you prefer are bitching about.

Now ham radio has become, for the MOST part nothing more than "taxi" radio.  It has become HTs, repeaters or boxes connected to antennas bought and erected.  This is exactly why CB radio became so popular so fast.

It has been shown that a majority of new "hams" get into the hobby with these dumbed down "question pools" instead of learning about the things that make ham radio what it used to be, the most interesting hobby in existence.

This has all come about because amateur radio was dying.  The "fix" was to make it easier to become a "ham" with dumbed down entrance exams, i.e, question pools.  Prior to that it was the Novice ticket, which was a great idea that eventually failed because it still wasn't easy enough.  Now with this 'everyone can get a license' thing, the numbers are increasing and the commercial gear has never been higher. The ARRL is happier; the vendors are happy. 

THIS is why so many are disgusted with the present influx of new hams and why you read so many questions here on eHam that can or are answered by simply reading the equipment instruction manuals or any one of hundreds of books available on the subjects.

What I am saying is, I hear,  "I don't know what to do; the hell with figuring it out, ask someone to figure it out for me.

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A Pessimist is Never Disappointed!
KOP
Member

Posts: 346




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« Reply #98 on: September 27, 2017, 11:18:35 AM »

Quote
Upgrade to Extra...
Nah. I have the only class of license that proves you actually know code.

The only proof you know code is the last CW contact you had. Is it really that important that the amateur community knows you are code proficient ? Is the extra bandwidth afforded by the upgrade worth it? I think both are valid questions. A better question for me,  is "conversational" code important enough for me to learn ? Actually it is. Is it important enough for me to prove it via COLEM, associate it with my FRN and display it in my sig line on every amateur radio forum known to the web ? Probably not.
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I considered a microwave oven magnetron and a 4' dish as a drone-killer. The ERP would be on the order of a hundred thousand watts or so. ~anon

November 28, 2018, 09:16:04 AM
W9IQ
Member

Posts: 3563




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« Reply #99 on: September 27, 2017, 11:28:14 AM »

Quote
Nah. I have the only class of license that proves you actually know code.

You have a Novice license?

- Glenn W9IQ
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- Glenn W9IQ

I never make a mistake. I thought I did once but I was wrong.
KOP
Member

Posts: 346




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« Reply #100 on: September 27, 2017, 11:56:54 AM »

This isn't the largest thread drift I've seen here but wasn't the original topic "Burning in" tubes? Roll Eyes
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I considered a microwave oven magnetron and a 4' dish as a drone-killer. The ERP would be on the order of a hundred thousand watts or so. ~anon

November 28, 2018, 09:16:04 AM
KC2QYM
Member

Posts: 958




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« Reply #101 on: September 27, 2017, 12:24:52 PM »

Yes, a number of guys did totally deviate from the title theme.  Let's get back to it shall we?
I burn them tubes in the fireplace and watch em pop....
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W9FIB
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Posts: 2531




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« Reply #102 on: September 27, 2017, 02:39:08 PM »

Now ham radio has become, for the MOST part nothing more than "taxi" radio.  It has become HTs, repeaters or boxes connected to antennas bought and erected.  This is exactly why CB radio became so popular so fast.

Yea it grew so fast that now most of the companies that made them are gone. Just like the majority of operators from that time period are gone as well. Under that scenario ham radio has about 3-5 years left. Must be doomsday soon!

Also some taxi companies have far better equipment than the average ham.
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73, Stan
Wisdom is knowledge you gain after you know it all.
KM4AH
Member

Posts: 963




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« Reply #103 on: September 27, 2017, 04:04:45 PM »

Quote
Nah. I have the only class of license that proves you actually know code.

You have a Novice license?

- Glenn W9IQ

Advanced.
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KB2WIG
Member

Posts: 636




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« Reply #104 on: September 27, 2017, 04:59:56 PM »




This is what the  FCC uls website would show if you upgrade to Extra


Amateur Data  
 
Operator Class           Amateur Extra             Prev. Op. Class           Advanced  


This is what finally did it for me; I can look down on the lowly Generals and haughtily look down on the un-washed no coders.
Its a win win situation.

 

EXTRALight - 7 wpm less than our regular EXTRA.


klc

They removed the tubes and then sent me home.
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EXTRALight  1/3 less WPM than a Real EXTRA
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