Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Duplicate QSLs  (Read 4193 times)
WO7R
Member

Posts: 3232




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: December 10, 2017, 10:18:02 PM »

The other imaginable thing that could be done is to be very ruthless about postage.  This could again be a sponsorship issue, but it has long been true that some DXpeditioners (and even ordinary DXers) put out a much cheaper card for the "buro".  The most important thing is not whether it is a full color card or not, but how thick the paper is.  The difference in thickness can mean the difference between 10 cards per ounce and 18 per ounce. That translates directly into mailing costs.  

I suggest that you could go as thin as 120 grams per square meter (the US nomenclature for paper weight is a nightmare, so I give only metric) and this would still give a usably thick, sort-able card for the volunteers.  The 120 grams per square meter would be the same as resume paper (though if you shop a bit, you can find much cheaper paper at the same weight class).  Easy to get the paper cost in the 1 to 2 cents range, per card.

The difficulty here is that many of the 'QSL card professionals' here seem to prefer heavier weight cards.  One vendor I like does have an inexpensive 'buro' card, but it is still 185 grams per square meter.  That is only about 12 cards to the ounce.  As far as I can tell, others do the same.   So, on this path, one would really be designing and printing one's own cards using a local shop or something.  Still, once you get into the 1,000s of card volumes, getting them printed and cut just about anywhere is not as bad as one might think as far as costs go.  They will also use whatever paper you like.

Maybe you could negotiate different paper stock with one of the professional QSL card vendors for "buro" cards?  The thing is, even free cards can (for buro cards anyway) give back a lot of that saved money if the cards are thick enough.

In the US, you could also plan on mailing to the international "buros" (or at least JA and DL for reasons well known to DXpedition QSL managers) by using a slightly smaller card (3 1/2 by 5 1/4 inches).  The US has a box where "if it fits it ships" that can be cost effective.

The medium box, which could fit 2200 of the cards I just described (inside dimensions are 11 by 8.5 by 6 inches), would get the mailed cost of the 120 grams per square meter card down to about 2 cents each for international priority mail.  They could presumably be printed for 3 to 5 cents.  The small box would be much pricier as it has much less volume, but could still be used for smaller volumes at a similar price per card, but fewer cards.

I frankly don't know how Global QSLs makes its price happen.  Maybe mailing is unusually cheap from Israel.


« Last Edit: December 10, 2017, 10:22:33 PM by WO7R » Logged
N3QE
Member

Posts: 5472




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2017, 05:32:14 AM »

I frankly don't know how Global QSLs makes its price happen.  Maybe mailing is unusually cheap from Israel.

Many real QSL bureaus use outgoing costs to support their incoming operations. Even when sorted by volunteers and recipients supply envelopes/postage there are still real costs.

GlobalQSL has no such incoming costs.

I worry that ARRL just instituted a "Death Spiral" by adding surcharges to outgoing service. Folks move to GlobalQSL for outgoing, driving down ARRL bureau receipts even more, possibly to the point that incoming costs cannot be supported.
Logged
VA3VF
Member

Posts: 1941




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: December 11, 2017, 05:56:26 AM »

I frankly don't know how Global QSLs makes its price happen.  Maybe mailing is unusually cheap from Israel.

I'm surprised we don't have a China based commercial QSL bureau yet. Their postal costs are really low. The system must be heavily subsidized, not doubt. Look at eBay purchases from China. How can there be any money left on a 50 cents item that includes worldwide shipping? Let's not get political, or involved in trade wars, focus on the shipping costs only, please. Grin

But there are alternatives to 'official' postal services as well. I have received items that were routed through shipping companies in Belgium and the Netherlands. Curious to hear about these operations.
Logged
VA3VF
Member

Posts: 1941




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: December 11, 2017, 06:03:22 AM »

Many real QSL bureaus use outgoing costs to support their incoming operations. Even when sorted by volunteers and recipients supply envelopes/postage there are still real costs.

While there are costs, I doubt the incoming bureau would be in jeopardy due to costs, if the outgoing bureau were to cease to operate. Like a lot of other things, volunteer heroes are the reason these things exist.

But if outgoing bureaus were to stop operating, incoming bureaus would also stop overtime, for lack of cards to distribute.
Logged
K5GS
Member

Posts: 30




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: December 11, 2017, 07:20:58 AM »

I frankly don't know how Global QSLs makes its price happen.  Maybe mailing is unusually cheap from Israel.

Many real QSL bureaus use outgoing costs to support their incoming operations. Even when sorted by volunteers and recipients supply envelopes/postage there are still real costs.

GlobalQSL has no such incoming costs.

I worry that ARRL just instituted a "Death Spiral" by adding surcharges to outgoing service. Folks move to GlobalQSL for outgoing, driving down ARRL bureau receipts even more, possibly to the point that incoming costs cannot be supported.


I think the Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) is on the leading edge of dealing with the buro system.

RSGB members may receive cards via the RSGB Buro system at no additional charge. Unlike the ARRL whose incoming system is free to everyone, member or not, the RSGB implemented a fee for non members.

Non members must pay an annual fee to receive cards.

Non-members and short wave listeners


"Full use of the RSGB QSL Bureau is a members-only benefit. However it is possible for UK-based, non-members to collect incoming cards in the usual way—but not send them—by joining the RSGB QSL receive service, for which there is a nominal annual fee. To join, simply follow the link from this page."

RSGB QSL Receive Service
If you are not a member of the RSGB but would like to receive QSL via the RSGB Bureau there is a charge for doing so. The subscription will cover all UK callsigns you hold but these are restricted to a single UK address for receipt and the callsign must be registered to you (if your details are withheld in the RSGB Yearbook, we may request a copy of your licence for any additional callsigns). If you would like to sign up for the service you may select a fixed term of 1, 2 or 3 years for the service and make a payment by credit or debit card.

Pay by DD and SAVE

If you choose to pay by annual direct debit you can save £4.00 OFF the one year price of the service. If you would like an application form to return to us please click here or alternatively ring the RSGB sales office on +44 (0) 1234 832700, during office hours, to complete the application over the phone. This form can also be used if you would prefer to Join the RSGB and gain all the other benefits of membership including the ability to send cards via the bureau and our great monthly magazine RadCom.

------------------------------

QSL Recieve Service
1 Year @ £11.99
2 Years @ £19.99
3 Years @ £27.99

Logged
VE3VEE
Member

Posts: 1807




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: December 11, 2017, 07:23:56 AM »


I frankly don't know how Global QSLs makes its price happen.  Maybe mailing is unusually cheap from Israel.


I started to use Global QSL about a year ago, and I'm still trying to form my opinion and decide whether to continue using the service. I suspect QSL cards are not being shipped out from Global QSL as often as advertised. The following information is straight from the QSL managers of the respective bureaus: VE QSL bureau has not received a single package from Global QSL in 2017 yet, 9A QSL bureau has not received anything from Global in 2 to 3 years, and OM QSL bureau has not received anything from Global QSL in 5 to 7 years. Since I had sent over 100 QSL cards to OM-land alone, I inquired when the last shipment by Global QSL was made. The following was the answer received a week ago:

Hello Marvin,

Last shipment to Slovakia was about 80 days.
Is it a sea land delivery please allow 180 days for delivery.

73

Azar  4X6MI


As I said, I'm still trying to form my opinion and decide if to continue using Global QSL, so if someone here has some valuable first hand knowledge of the service, please do share.

Marvin VE3VEE
Logged
N3QE
Member

Posts: 5472




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: December 14, 2017, 04:35:48 AM »

I think the Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) is on the leading edge of dealing with the buro system.

RSGB outgoing bureau went almost a whole decade without sending any buro cards to USA.

Just got straightened out a year or two ago (thanks to M0URX and others).

I am glad they are getting back on track.
Logged
K5GS
Member

Posts: 30




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: December 14, 2017, 11:40:05 AM »

I think the Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) is on the leading edge of dealing with the buro system.

RSGB outgoing bureau went almost a whole decade without sending any buro cards to USA.

Just got straightened out a year or two ago (thanks to M0URX and others).

I am glad they are getting back on track.


10 years seems like a long time, so I asked Tim. 

While Tim does recall there were some issues, there was a solution to get the cards into the ARRL buro system. It would be difficult to believe RSGB and ARRL would sit on this for almost a decade.

Regardless, both organizations face the same financial challenges, the bureaus should not operate at a loss to either organization. In 2008 RSGB outsourced some buro services.

I think companies that made buggy whips had similar strategic challenges.

On a more positive note:

Last month Tim celebrated 10 years as a QSL manager.
http://www.m0urx.com/3-M0URX/746-united-radio-10-years-of-qsl-management.html

Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!