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Author Topic: 1000kHz Time - Frequency Station?  (Read 4969 times)
W6EM
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Posts: 1941




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« on: January 03, 2018, 04:57:53 PM »

I was tuning an old analog dial radio across the broadcast band, and I came across what sounded like a time/frequency broadcast with the familiar "ticks" and momentary tone on 1000kHz.

No ID, and I've listened to it on two evenings.  From the loostick orientation, it appears to be from north or south of my temporary location in NW Florida.

It isn't an image of an upper SW frequency broadcast of either WWV or CHU.  Although it does sound a lot like the CHU tick and tone sequence.

Do any of you have any idea what it is or where it's coming from?

Lee
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RENTON481
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Posts: 279




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« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2018, 05:39:14 PM »

Possibly Radio Reloj ("Radio Clock") from Cuba. Time ticks and 'R' in Morse Code.

I know Radio Reloj is audible on the Gulf Coast (I heard it once on a boombox when I was in Louisiana). According to Wikipedia, they have an outlet on 1020 khz, as well as numerous other frequencies.
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W6EM
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Posts: 1941




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« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2018, 06:14:48 PM »

Thanks.  Very likely is RR, as my dial could have been off a bit.  In fact, as I just heard the two CW "Rs", it is Radio Reloj.

I'm in Pensacola temporarily, right near the Gulf of Mexico, so a direct shot across the water.  About 500 miles, plus or minus.

The old radio is a "super-sensitive" Sony TC-7, purchased in 1975 in Fiji.  A radio that was well made at the time.


« Last Edit: January 03, 2018, 06:31:07 PM by W6EM » Logged
RENTON481
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« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2018, 01:00:32 PM »

I heard Radio Reloj (and a few other UNID Caribbean signals) on a GE boombox that had a terrific MW section, and I was on Grand Isle, Louisiana at the time. It was really cool to hear. I've never heard it since (not in the SE US).
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W6EM
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Posts: 1941




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« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2018, 05:24:54 PM »

Like I said, that old Sony is/was one fine receiver, for an inexpensive AM/SW portable.

What I find strange in reading the Wiki description of La Radio Reloj, are the multiple frequencies and the supposedly high power (50kW) used on each.  Which begs the questions: Was/is the purpose more than propaganda?  It emits a tone, apparently once per minute with the ticks and "RR.".  Is it used as a synchronizing time base for clocks or other instruments?  If so, the time delays in transmission to various sites would not result in identical times.  It doesn't make much sense that a small, economically diminished country would spend a lot of money on radio transmissions without an important purpose.

One would think that with GPS clock technology, a much more accurate timing signal with less chance for error (relative delay would be more equivalent from a satellite than from earth stations).

Maybe its not as complicated... like synchronizing schoolhouse clocks..  :-)



 
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W6EM
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Posts: 1941




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« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2018, 10:13:03 AM »

The correct frequency for it is 950kHz.  An Orlando station, WTLN, running 5kW at night, interferes, but the loopstick allows a bit more directivity to pick it out.

50kW is a lot of power, so not surprised it comes barreling through.  When other modulated content appears, it is at a very low level.  Perhaps 50% or less modulation, and hard to hear.

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NO2A
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« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2018, 06:55:32 PM »

I'm right on the FL Panhandle and I hear them mostly from about 800-900khz,with one on 570 also. If your radio tunes as low as 530,you might be able to hear Radio Enciclopedia. They play soft, classical type music. From Havana. 
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