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Author Topic: I wonder about morse code  (Read 20857 times)
KC8KTN
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« on: January 06, 2018, 08:56:27 PM »

On  all the movies and tv shows I have watched and morse code is being received is it real...I was watching Wild Wild West tv show and morse code was sent to James West rail car was what was being sent was what tv show said it was. Hmmmmmm.Have a Blessed Day. Be Safe. God Bless All.
  ..END OF TRANSMISSION.


https://youtu.be/jHHj09tVi9Q"

« Last Edit: January 06, 2018, 09:06:12 PM by KC8KTN » Logged
WZ7U
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« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2018, 09:22:38 PM »

Why not learn it then you would know? That's how I fixed it when I had the same question. It's not really hard, it just requires regular practice to retain and regular use to stay on top of the game.

Most of the time it seems like jibberish and occasionally something really funny. Otherwise, it is usually what you might expect. Depends on the program.
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KC8KTN
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« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2018, 09:29:21 PM »

https://youtu.be/bNoOYeS0gs0

Have a Blessed Day.God Bless.Be Safe
 END OF TRANSMISSION   
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WZ7U
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« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2018, 09:47:52 PM »


That tapping reminded me of what the original Morse operators had to work with. No 600hz tones, only clacking and timing spaces. Amazing, quite the skill.
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G3RZP
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« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2018, 01:49:57 AM »

And also American Morse, not the international Morse that is most used.
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KAPT4560
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« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2018, 02:10:07 AM »

  Both my parents were music teachers. I started piano at 4 yrs old and strings at 7 yrs old. It gave me a good ear and a sense of pitch, rhythm and cadence.
 Playing instruments also strengthened my hands and fingers considerably. My parents bought me the AMECO code practice records (which I still have).
 I became interested in electronics, listened to dad's shortwave (no BFO) and got my WN2BIA Novice license in 1972 (7th grade). Keeping in practice is important. Concentration with no distractions is important. It is like a 2nd language, but still in english.
 A guy at work and I whistle code back and forth at each other whenever we work in the same area. A couple of other nearby radio guys have caught on to what we are doing.
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W1JKA
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« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2018, 03:20:12 AM »

 .
 A guy at work and I whistle code back and forth at each other whenever we work in the same area. A couple of other nearby radio guys have caught on to what we are doing.

Be careful whistle blowing is frowned on by the management.
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KC8KTN
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« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2018, 06:49:13 AM »

There is a AWESOME  code application for your smart phone. Morse Code Trainer M.C.T. . I will learn code in a month . I will practice practice practice . Everyone have a BLESSED DAY. Everyone Be Safe. GOD BLESS.
                                                             ......END OF TRANSMISSION.......

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rufnWLVQcKg
                                     .......END OF TRANSMISSION #2.........
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KC8KTN
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« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2018, 07:15:17 AM »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PCQjE9yj5n4


                           .......AWESOME..........
                                                                 .......END OF TRANSMISSION......
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KC8KTN
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« Reply #9 on: January 07, 2018, 07:53:08 AM »

Morse code and STAR TREK.    .WOW.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m916ZChc3oE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=diiKtGv-uDU

.....................................MORSE CODE IS THE BOMB/AWESOME/FANTASTIC...............

.................................WOWX2....................
............................................--------------END OF TRANSMISSION--------------------.....................
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N0YXB
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« Reply #10 on: January 07, 2018, 08:13:22 AM »

There is a AWESOME  code application for your smart phone. Morse Code Trainer M.C.T. . I will learn code in a month . I will practice practice practice.
And you'll get your Extra, and you'll deal with the non-HOA neighbor who doesn't like antennas, and you'll get an IC-7300, and you'll put up a billboard promoting ham radio, and you'll be offered countless jobs by you adversaries, and ...

Let me help you, 2018 will be more fantasy. Looking forward to the fiction you'll write on eHAM this year.   Wink
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SWMAN
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« Reply #11 on: January 07, 2018, 02:19:55 PM »

Just wondering if anyone knows what they called the morse code that used click sounds rather that beeps. I remember my dad taking me down to the railroad where he worked and the telegraph operator was his friend and they used the click code. This was around 1960 or so. Seems like clicks would be harder to understand than beeps because of the spacing of letters etc.
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KAPT4560
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« Reply #12 on: January 07, 2018, 11:47:13 PM »

 The telegraph receiver was called a sounder. There was an 'on' click as well as an 'off' click, so that the operator would know when the dot or dash began and ended.
 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telegraph_sounder
 I agree that deciphering clicks would take a highly skilled ear. Some machines could punch or ink a strip of paper tape with dots and dashes as a reader.
 Early radio used undampened waves (CW) for telegraphy. A regenerative receiver could then be adjusted into the point of oscillation in order to add 'tone' to the CW signal for an easy copy.
 The superheterodyne and BFO came later.
 
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G3RZP
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« Reply #13 on: January 08, 2018, 03:35:17 AM »

The telegraph with sounders used American or 'land line' Morse, which had significant differences from International Morse Code. For example, a 'P' was 5 dots....so a very good test of using a mechanical bug key was to be able to send 'Mississippi ships' in American Morse.

You may wonder why mechanical Morse keys in the US have a 'switch' to short circuit them. This is because in the land line system, all keys and sounders were in series, so if a key was left open, there was no communication possible. Not necessary for radio purposes, but while the railroads were using Morse, there was a demand for keys of that sort. Can be useful when tuning a tx, though.
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SWMAN
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« Reply #14 on: January 08, 2018, 06:24:58 AM »

Thanks guys for explaining the Click style of code to me. I can see why they don't use it anymore as it seems more difficult to read or send as compared to our code that we use nowadays. I'll bet the old style took much more practice to learn.      73. Jim. W5JJG  in Texas
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