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Author Topic: Did anyone here used to DX or regularly listen to the police on 1650-1700 khz?  (Read 6607 times)
G3RZP
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« Reply #15 on: March 16, 2018, 03:59:44 AM »

My father told me about listening to US police transmissions just above 30 MHz in about 1938-9.
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KM1H
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« Reply #16 on: March 16, 2018, 07:24:09 AM »

Doesnt CHP still maintain a presence on VHF Low Band?

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HFCRUSR
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« Reply #17 on: March 16, 2018, 07:57:42 AM »

Doesnt CHP still maintain a presence on VHF Low Band?


Yes.
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Not a ham, but an avid hobbyist in HF world. All things, short of transmit happen in this shack.
N9AOP
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« Reply #18 on: March 16, 2018, 09:44:38 AM »

In the mid 50,s I remember listening to police just above the AM band.  Don't remember who but the traffic was so constant that I believe it was Chicago.
Art
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KA4DPO
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« Reply #19 on: March 16, 2018, 10:19:57 AM »

I started listening to SW in 1963 when my uncle gave me an old Zenith trans-oceanic radio.  I put up a wire antenna outside and it really pulled in the stations, the bands were alive with activity in those days.  I remember the marking on the dial that said police but by the 1960's the police, in Southern California at least, were all on VHF so I never heard any police on the low band.  I did used to hear a lot of marine radio traffic on AM phone between 2 and 3 MHZ.  The farthest I ever heard were fishing boats down off the coast of Peru and Chile. 
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DL8OV
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« Reply #20 on: March 17, 2018, 03:30:53 AM »

If you watch 'In The Heat of the Night' the police chief has a very long whip antenna on the back of his car, way too long for VHF.

It's also a great movie.

Peter DL8OV
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KB2WIG
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« Reply #21 on: March 17, 2018, 06:34:27 AM »



Commonly caled VHF Low.


It was an interesting movie...   no Miranda before they hauled Sid in ...

KLC
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EXTRALight  1/3 less WPM than a Real EXTRA
AA4HA
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« Reply #22 on: March 17, 2018, 08:45:05 AM »

The VHF-Low band is 30-50 MHz and can still be found in use by State and County police departments where long-range coverage is needed.

It is not uncommon to get Mobile-Base communications out to 100 miles. You can see that if you were trying to cover an entire state you could accomplish that with a half-dozen or so base stations.

One state agency I did a little bit of work for had five or six frequencies in the 44 MHz part of the band. Each district had their own base and frequency, plus there was a statewide base-mobile and another statewide mobile-mobile frequency. From their central office at the state capital they also had a voting receiver rack on the statewide B-M frequency.

With 110 watts in a car the voting receiver board would light-up from 3-4 of the receiving sites. The base would then selectively reply back to the strongest base for that mobile. Additionally they had the ability to simulcast to every base transmitter from the central office (like the voice of god, they would do that for weather emergencies).

This was all very 1960's-1970's but worked quite well.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
K1DA
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« Reply #23 on: March 17, 2018, 11:34:22 AM »

If you watch 'In The Heat of the Night' the police chief has a very long whip antenna on the back of his car, way too long for VHF.

It's also a great movie.   Police operated AM and then FM just above 10 meters.  That whip was for  the 29.7 to 31 MHZ bandband.  Our state  DEM was on 31MHZ until l the 90's.  The Mass state police may STILL have some 40 MHZ gear in their cars for use in the western part of the state.  Those "low band" 100 watt Micors could talk a long way on simplex back then.  My small town police operated in the 31MHZ range until the 80s using loaded whips which looked like VHF antennas.  They would have QRM from the Arizona Highway Patrol  during times when 10 and above were open. 

Peter DL8OV
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NO2A
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Posts: 1400




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« Reply #24 on: March 17, 2018, 12:14:08 PM »

Wow...  I have been doing Ham Radio for 50 years now, and never knew the police were above the AM broadcast band...  What year was this when it was happening?

30's.     When I read this you got me thinking about the 30's. Images of "The green mile" movie and the electric chair! My grandfather once said you could always tell when a prisoner was being executed by the lights dimming in everyone's houses!
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KF7CG
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« Reply #25 on: March 18, 2018, 05:21:43 PM »

Yes, I remember police above the BC band back in the fifties. That is what got me interested in Amateur Radio.

David
KF7CG
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W4AMP
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« Reply #26 on: March 19, 2018, 04:52:47 PM »

A lot of Georgia public service was on 31-44 mhz in the sixties and seventies.
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WB6CVR
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« Reply #27 on: March 20, 2018, 05:22:07 PM »

I remember listening to the Los Angeles area police on LF during the 1965 Watts riots. The friend has a new HRO-500 that tuned in just about everything. We listened in the evenings from about 140 miles northeast of LA.
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K1HMS
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Posts: 526




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« Reply #28 on: March 22, 2018, 10:24:19 AM »

During the late 1960's I found I could de-tune a table radio and listen to ~1700 kHz police calls from Los Angeles from San Jose, CA. They were 59+ any night of the year. All I could hear was dispatch. Still, pre cell phones, DMR, and victims rights it was plain language and interesting. There was a area around Figaroa St SP? that always had something happening.
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W2LO
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« Reply #29 on: March 26, 2018, 01:49:36 PM »

 I started DXing in the mid-fifties and read publications at the time that police communications often took place just above the broadcast band. Try as I might over several years, I heard nothing.

 I think that around 1700 Khz or so police communications DID take place but were mostly, although not completely, supplanted by VHF and frequencies around 35Mhz beginning in the years after WW II. The publications that I read at the time were simply repeating largely out-of-date info.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2018, 01:56:53 PM by W2LO » Logged
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