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Author Topic: LTE interference on TV signals  (Read 1320 times)
N8FNR
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Posts: 308




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« on: March 28, 2018, 07:49:11 AM »

Interesting article about using filters to keep LTE signals from bleeding over to improve TV reception.
https://www.techhive.com/article/3235649/tv-antenna/lte-filters-for-tv-antennas.html

Zack N8FNR
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W8JX
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Posts: 13268




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« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2018, 08:17:11 AM »

Personally I thinks its a bad move to convert digital TV spectrum to LTE. There is a lot of spectrum available above 900 mhz that some providers are sitting on unused. Granted 700 mhz has a somewhat better ground wave range than 2 ghz there is still far more frequency for use at 2ghz and above that should be used instead. FCC is bowing to special interest lobbying and not for the best consumer interests here trying to squeeze free OTA programing which ATT for one would like to see go away so you have to pay to watch TV.
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N0YXB
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Posts: 1542




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« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2018, 08:39:46 AM »

Interesting article about using filters to keep LTE signals from bleeding over to improve TV reception.
https://www.techhive.com/article/3235649/tv-antenna/lte-filters-for-tv-antennas.html

Zack N8FNR

Interesting indeed, thanks for sharing.

The major wireless carriers utilize multiple LTE bands, often referred to as low, medium and high bands. For example, one carrier has LTE allocations in the 800 MHz band, the 1900 MHz band and the 2500 MHz band. The wireless device and the network determine which band to use at any given time. The 2500 MHz band is great for high throughput if you've got sufficient signal quality. Otherwise the device will utilize 1900 MHz, or perhaps if the device is indoors or in an area where the 1900 or 2500 MHz signals are insufficient, 800 MHz. With the constant growth in data, the major carriers make good use of their spectrum allotments. I expect greater use of the former OTA TV spectrum as 5G networks roll out in the next couple of years.
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N8EKT
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« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2018, 07:26:20 PM »

Tv LTE filters cut off at 700Mhz so they work well today but in the very near future you will need a filter that cuts off at 600Mhz due to more tv spectrum sales.
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