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Author Topic: Doc Martin  (Read 3913 times)
K3UIM
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Posts: 387




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« on: April 05, 2018, 08:28:08 AM »

If this is too far from the ham radio subject, feel free to delete it.

I was fanning the TV dial and came across a "Brit-com" called "Doc Martin". I loved it!! Has anyone out there also found the series? It is hilarious! Talk about "quirky"! Hi. "Waiting On God" and "Are You Being Served" ended and I was hoping for another series like it out of England. This is it!

Charlie, K3UIM
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Where I am: You will be!
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KC9MGX
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Posts: 14




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« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2018, 08:33:04 AM »

I've seen it! I can't say that I really enjoyed any of the characters very much. Doc himself is just too cold and there's no rich counterpart character (for example, consider the characters around House in the series....House).

BUT the scenery and the idea of life in the village is really nice. Whenever I've seen the show, it's the setting that held my attention.

Father Brown (available on Netflix) is a similar show that is just as quirky but I think a little more compelling. Foyle's War is similar, but even more serious in some ways.

Enjoy.

73 de KC9MGX, Dave
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VK6IS
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Posts: 358




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« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2018, 08:42:52 AM »

if you can get the entire series on DVD then there is some extra's from the support actors.

- it's a great UK show, & one of the better ones, too.

also do look for some of the UK police drama shows - their very good, too.
- quite different to US police drama shows. . .
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K0UA
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« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2018, 09:10:13 AM »

I have watched all Three, and Midsommer Murders too.  Foyles war was the best of the bunch. Doc Martin was a cold fish, the wife he married was pretty decent.
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73  James K0UA
ARRL Missouri Technical Specialist
N0YXB
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Posts: 1543




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« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2018, 10:34:13 AM »

If this is too far from the ham radio subject, feel free to delete it.

I was fanning the TV dial and came across a "Brit-com" called "Doc Martin". I loved it!! Has anyone out there also found the series? It is hilarious! Talk about "quirky"! Hi. "Waiting On God" and "Are You Being Served" ended and I was hoping for another series like it out of England. This is it!

Charlie, K3UIM


All great shows. And the British police drama "New Tricks" is also very good.
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WA2ONH
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Posts: 518




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« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2018, 12:37:15 PM »

Have not seen the Doc Martin series. My favorite was the Foyle's War series.

Do you shop PBS for vidoes? https://shop.pbs.org/

Doc Martin Series 1-6 + The Movies + Series 7 + Series 8 DVD Combo DVD Combo
https://shop.pbs.org/doc-martin-series-1-6-the-movies-series-7-series-8-dvd-combo-dvd-combo/product/DMAR459
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73 de WA2ONH  <dit dit> ... Charlie
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Never be satisfied with what you know, only with what more you can find out"
Dr David Fairchild 1869-1954 US Scientist
AB3MO
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« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2018, 03:53:22 PM »

Doc Martin: Excellent acting, good character development over the entire series of at least three/four seasons.  The "Doc," Martin Clunes, has played one of the lead characters in "Men Behaving Badly" and has narrated the "British Islands" series on the smaller islands surrounding Great Britain. The series also serves as a public educational contribution on widespread public health issues from The National Health Service.  Doc Martin might best be described as having a bit of Asperger's and an excessive interest in patient health rather than the patient!  I sympathize with him.     
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K3UIM
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Posts: 387




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« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2018, 05:44:19 PM »

It's just me again! I now have, thanks to eBay, the entire 9 episodes!!
Woo-hah!
Charlie. K3UIM
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W0BKR
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Posts: 2066




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« Reply #8 on: April 12, 2018, 05:45:48 PM »

Never heard of it...links to some of it?
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WD4AOG
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« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2018, 10:47:23 PM »

Love the series.  My wife and I are entirely hooked on it and can't wait for the last 2 seasons to be released in the U.S.  Tried to call the American distributor, American Public Television in Boston, but you can't get a human on the phone to make such an inquiry.  Gave up on them and decided to subscribe to Acorn where the final seasons are already available.

I love all the characters and the writing is superb.  I agree that the location scenes are set in some very scenic places which, as I've read, has done wonders for tourism in the area.

If you haven't seen it, the series is available on Netflix up through the 6th season.  Watch the first 4 episodes or so of season 1 to learn why the doctor developed possibly the worst bedside manner in the history of medicine.

If you like Doc Martin, also look up Northern Exposure, a CBS series from the 90's featuring another doctor stuck in a place he hates and the eccentric characters that surround him.
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KE6EE
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Posts: 2788




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« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2018, 05:00:16 PM »

British TV series are often of very high quality.

All of the shows mentioned thus far, plus many more, are available via Acorn TV which is
accessed from the internet via a Roku box, Apple TV, etc.
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N9CQC
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Posts: 10




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« Reply #11 on: April 27, 2018, 10:59:23 AM »

When it comes to mysteries, no one does it better than the Brits.  I especially enjoy the Morse series (Morse, Inspector Lewis and Endeavor) with the subtle ham radio connection.

Ed
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K4EZD
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Posts: 170




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« Reply #12 on: April 27, 2018, 11:56:59 AM »

In the British series Lark Rise to Candleford the post office handled telegrams that appear to be sent by code and automatically translated and printed. In the show you hear the transmissions and there is a copying device.  Does anyone have any idea about that technology and if it is actually Morse code that is being sent and copied?   (my wife watched it and so I had to also).  Grin
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N7EKU
Member

Posts: 1037




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« Reply #13 on: April 27, 2018, 07:40:18 PM »

Hi,

These were printing telegraphs.  Wikipedia has some good information and pictures:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telegraphy#Telegraphic_improvements

Quote
David Edward Hughes invented the printing telegraph in 1855; it used a keyboard of 26 keys for the alphabet and a spinning type wheel that determined the letter being transmitted by the length of time that had elapsed since the previous transmission. The system allowed for automatic recording on the receiving end. The system was very stable and accurate and became the accepted around the world.[42]

The next improvement was the Baudot code of 1874. French engineer Émile Baudot patented a printing telegraph in which the signals were translated automatically into typographic characters. Each character was assigned a unique code based on the sequence of just five contacts. Operators had to maintain a steady rhythm, and the usual speed of operation was 30 words per minute.[43]

I haven't seen the show so I don't know what the device looks like, but maybe it would be one of the two above.

73,


Mark.
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Mark -- N7EKU/VE3
K4EZD
Member

Posts: 170




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« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2018, 02:21:52 PM »

Hi,

These were printing telegraphs.  Wikipedia has some good information and pictures:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telegraphy#Telegraphic_improvements

Quote
David Edward Hughes invented the printing telegraph in 1855; it used a keyboard of 26 keys for the alphabet and a spinning type wheel that determined the letter being transmitted by the length of time that had elapsed since the previous transmission. The system allowed for automatic recording on the receiving end. The system was very stable and accurate and became the accepted around the world.[42]

The next improvement was the Baudot code of 1874. French engineer Émile Baudot patented a printing telegraph in which the signals were translated automatically into typographic characters. Each character was assigned a unique code based on the sequence of just five contacts. Operators had to maintain a steady rhythm, and the usual speed of operation was 30 words per minute.[43]

I haven't seen the show so I don't know what the device looks like, but maybe it would be one of the two above.

73,


Mark.
Thanks for the info Mark
73
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