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Author Topic: Virgin: That First QSO Ever -- Remember Yours?  (Read 4530 times)
K8AXW
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Posts: 6994




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« Reply #15 on: April 11, 2018, 11:16:24 AM »

Quote
My first QSO was ....well....orgasmic.  I saw stars, my breath became heavy, I don't remember what we talked about...mostly mumbling and grunts, afterwards I relaxed and smoked a cigarette.

The QSO I wanted to forget?  Well QYM, you brought it all back in vivid color!

You see, I was using the Heath AT-1 transmitter which used cathode keying.  It was hot in the shack, there were a couple other hams there and I was sweating like a pig.

I heard a Norwegian station call CQ and I gave him a call. When he returned using my call, for the first time, I too was breathless.

That's when I got my sweaty hand across the key contacts and almost electrocuted myself!

I too saw stars, the breathing stopped or perhaps paused at least, and instead of becoming "orgasmic" I almost loaded my pants!  My key arm was numb, feeling like it had been smashed with a mallet and my mind to this day can't recall what I said. 

Whatever it was probably didn't sound like coherent Morse because the guy rattled off something and was gone!

He didn't even kiss me!

I too had a cigarette but a buddy had to light it because my thumb still wasn't strong enough to flip the wheel on my Zippo lighter!  Which was a blessing I guess because I was shaking so bad I probably would have burned my nose.

Some things are best forgotten!

 
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A Pessimist is Never Disappointed!
W4KVW
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Posts: 185




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« Reply #16 on: April 16, 2018, 05:06:49 PM »

It was is March of 1994 on 2 meter simplex with a local.My 1st HF Contact was from my mobile with a Ham in Minnesota on 17 meters just 20 minutes or so after passing the General Written & 5 WPM Code.I ACED both test & did straight copy on the CW which I do NOT use since it gives me a terrible headache & I can't stand listening to all of that noise.I do Phone or Nothing.I have a QSL Card from that 1st HF QSO but not from the 2 meter contact.  Cheesy Grin Wink Smiley

Clayton
W4KVW
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WZ7U
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Posts: 1016




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« Reply #17 on: April 16, 2018, 05:15:58 PM »

Nope. Does that make me a radio slut?
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For this and every day, thank you Jesus
Philippians 4:8
AD8AT
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Posts: 5




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« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2018, 10:12:35 AM »

I remember it like it was less than 2 months ago...

Oh wait, it was less than 2 months ago.
On 2 meters.
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DL8OV
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Posts: 899




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« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2018, 12:53:11 AM »

A lot of clubs run classes for the ham radio examinations. One club I attended back in the UK had one final class AFTER the examinations where the folk with new tickets took turns to go on air for the first time with the support the rest of the class sitting behind them.

Certificates were then issued by the club marking the event.

Peter DL8OV
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N8AUC
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Posts: 391




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« Reply #20 on: May 11, 2018, 08:48:41 AM »

I'll never forget my first QSO. Ever.

It was my senior year of high school. I had taken my Novice exam in March 1978.
Back then, you didn't know if you passed or failed until you either got your license in the mail, or a letter from the FCC indicating you had failed.
The normal wait was about 13 weeks back then.

I was out mowing the front lawn at my parent's house when the mailman walked up. I shut off the mower, and met him in the driveway to take the mail.
I looked through the mail and there was an envelope from the FCC. I opened it up, and there was my brand new Novice license with the call sign KA8AKY!

I abandoned the mower in the front yard and went into the house. Fired up my homebrewed, crystal controlled CW transmitter and that old Hallicrafters S-111 receiver.
My elmer had tested the transmitter for me, and helped tune the ground mounted Hustler 4-BTV in the backyard. So I was ready to go if and when the license arrived.
(That should have been a hint right there that I had passed, but I didn't pick up on it!)

I called CQ on 40 meters a few times, and finally got a reply from WD9DOA in Litchfield, IL. I was nervous and a bit shaky as I made that first contact. Which is a massive
understatement. But I logged the contact, and sent him a QSL card. The return card came in the mail a week later, and I still have it.

Then I had to go back outside and finish the mowing. Had my father come home and found the half mowed lawn, with the abandoned mower in the front yard, my
first QSO might have been my last. Once the mowing was done, I came back inside and made a couple more contacts. Dad got home a few hours later, so that ended well.

5/27/1978, 1805Z, 7.115 MHz CW. That is where the journey began. And almost 40 years later, I'm still hamming, and still love CW on 40 meters.

73 de N8AUC
Eric

« Last Edit: May 11, 2018, 08:59:15 AM by N8AUC » Logged
AC7CW
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Posts: 1241




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« Reply #21 on: May 11, 2018, 09:21:14 AM »

In 1958 we had to wait a few weeks to receive our license and were not allowed to operate without it even though we passed the exam. Mine came in the mail one day. I told my Elmer, Bill, who lived quite close by. He came over, helped me tune up the Globe Scout and I got into a QSO only to find that I had forgotten the code! I was sending at about 3 wpm and having to stop and ask Bill for prompts on certain letters but I got through the QSO.
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Novice 1958, 20WPM Extra now... (and get off my lawn)
NO2A
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« Reply #22 on: May 11, 2018, 09:49:29 AM »

In those days if you got an F.C.C. notice in the mail 4 weeks after the test,you probably failed. When I passed mine I think it was 8-9 weeks or more. Oh the agony of " Did I pass?"
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WA2ISE
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Posts: 1177




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« Reply #23 on: May 18, 2018, 02:39:30 PM »

Got my license in 1976.  Tech (general written, novice code).  Had to go to the FCC office in New York City, summer of 76.  I had to do sending as well as copying the code.  Barely passed the written, which was a bit embarrassing for an electrical engineering major in college.   my parents mailed me the license and got it in October.  Went up to the Syracuse U ham club shack and fired up the SB102 transciever.  Managed to get a CW QSO with a local ham, Wx2QMS or something like that.  (too lazy to get the log out).  Exchanged QSL cards.  Went home for Thanksgiving and got on 2 meters phone.  Graduated 2 years later BSEE. 

In April 2000 became a "nickel" extra (5WPM but all the writtens).  And got a Kenwood TS440SAT to get on HF.  
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K9MHZ
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Posts: 1725




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« Reply #24 on: May 18, 2018, 05:45:31 PM »

It was my senior year of high school. I had taken my Novice exam in March 1978.
Back then, you didn't know if you passed or failed until you either got your license in the mail, or a letter from the FCC indicating you had failed.
The normal wait was about 13 weeks back then.

73 de N8AUC
Eric
He's not kidding, folks.  For all of the supposed fond memories of ham radio of the past, this wasn't one of them.
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KG4NEL
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Posts: 541




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« Reply #25 on: June 01, 2018, 11:00:23 AM »

My first QSO under my own call was probably on a repeater, but the first QSO(s) I remember specifically was an F2 opening on six meters around Christmas, 2001. Scotland and Greenland on that opening, with an HF rig connected to one of those Ten Tec transverters and an attic dipole.

Most embarrassing? Probably every time I get on for an international phone contest and I end up calling a Caribbean station out of the US phone band  Grin
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K3GM
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Posts: 2414




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« Reply #26 on: June 01, 2018, 03:23:14 PM »

Early June, 1980, I was home from work following surgery for a separated shoulder when my Novice ticket arrived.  10 minutes later, I banged out my first QSO on 15m with a station in Colorado using a straight key screwed to a board that spanned across the arms of my chair as my right arm was firmly secured to my side.  I have the log book with my first entry as well as a QSL card indicating my first QSO. The other op was 12 years old.  It's among my most coveted amateur radio things.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2018, 03:26:11 PM by K3GM » Logged
WA2ISE
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Posts: 1177




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« Reply #27 on: June 05, 2018, 02:32:10 PM »

In those days if you got an F.C.C. notice in the mail 4 weeks after the test,you probably failed. ...

When I took my tech plus (back then it was general written and novice code) at the FCC field office they graded my written right then and there and told me that I barely passed...   Grin   I thought I'd do better than that, but a pass is a pass.   It was about 2 months before I knew my callsign.  WA2ISE.  I wasn't excited about that suffix, but it did grow on me.  I did like getting a WA2 prefix, as it would make me look like an older ham.  Turns out the FCC was recycling callsigns back then.  As a brand new callsign would be WB2xxx. 
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VE3WI
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Posts: 44




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« Reply #28 on: June 06, 2018, 11:53:25 AM »

I got my Amateur (CW only) ticket in 1968 at Univ of New Brunswick.  I remember nervously checking in to the Maritime Net on 80m from the club station VE1UNB (VE9UNB now).  It was a phone net but graciously welcomed CWers.  I think my entire check-in was "NAME DAVE QRU".

73
Dave, VE3WI
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N9LCD
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Posts: 36




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« Reply #29 on: June 19, 2018, 12:58:52 PM »

My first QSO (HF) was as a guest operator of HV3SJ.  It's an extraterritorial Vatican-licensed ham station located at the Jesuit motherhouse in Rome proper.

The control op picked 40 meters, found an open frequency, swung the beam around and said "We'll start with Germany" and slide the mic to me.

OK, here I go, BIG TIME>  I knew what to call --  "CQ DX.  CD DX.  This is HV3SJ calling CQ DX, Germany."

I got one QSO before I got buried under the pileup. HV3** calls aren't the rarest DX around.  There's a HV3** station on the air at least once a month.  I got rattled, trying to pick out the next station to answer and the control op kindly took over, leaving me to log the stations worked and stare at the dome of St. Peter's -- AT EYE-LEVEL AND LESS THAT 200 YARDS AWAY.

N9LCD
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