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   Home   Help Search  
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Author Topic: Pretty Quiet Out There  (Read 6078 times)
KM6RWB
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Posts: 51




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« on: April 19, 2018, 11:57:17 AM »

I got on my club net for check in- then nada- it was quiet- I've been trying for almost 2 weeks and only have talked to 2 guys- one on a test- I have tried at all hours of the day and into the late evening and like someone said for a communications hobby there is not a lot of communicating on the 2 meter/70cm band. I'll keep on trying though, but I can see how someone may get discouraged after a while-  KM6RWB- Vic in SoCal
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SOFAR
Member

Posts: 1448




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« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2018, 12:42:50 PM »

After my first repeater contact (to confirm the radio was working), all subsequent contacts were simplex. 146.520 (2-meter calling frequency) also some activity on 146.550, 146.580, 446.000. Band plan lists more.

With some elevation, made a lot of simplex contacts with an FT-60.
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G3RZP
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Posts: 1225




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« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2018, 02:40:56 PM »

It sounds very active compared with 2m around here!!
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K0UA
Member

Posts: 4369




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« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2018, 04:29:01 PM »

Always contacts available on HF.
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73  James K0UA
ARRL Missouri Technical Specialist
KM6RWB
Member

Posts: 51




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« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2018, 06:46:07 PM »

I guess this is incentive to upgrade my license? it would be a big investment to have the same results though-
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N0YXB
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Posts: 1545




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« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2018, 06:54:16 PM »

I guess this is incentive to upgrade my license? 

I believe you'll find it's worth the time and effort.
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ONAIR
Member

Posts: 3730




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« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2018, 07:18:04 PM »

I got on my club net for check in- then nada- it was quiet- I've been trying for almost 2 weeks and only have talked to 2 guys- one on a test- I have tried at all hours of the day and into the late evening and like someone said for a communications hobby there is not a lot of communicating on the 2 meter/70cm band. I'll keep on trying though, but I can see how someone may get discouraged after a while-  KM6RWB- Vic in SoCal
   It may be quiet in your area.  Jump onto EchoLink, and you'll be able to chat with other hams all over the world 24/7!  www.EchoLink.org
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KG5AHC
Member

Posts: 239




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« Reply #7 on: April 19, 2018, 07:53:01 PM »

D-Star is another route to go.

According to http://dstarinfo.com/repeater-list.aspx There is a D-STAR repeater in Pomona CA and a good number of other ones in the Los Angeles area. (Anaheim, Corona, San Bernadino, etc).

A mobile D-STAR radio like the ICOM ID-4100A or the 5100A  in the car might be a great choice if you are on the road alot in LA.  Bring it indoors for a base station configuration with a 1/4 wave ground plane antenna outdoors.

With a DVDONGLE you can be on D-star with a computer and a headset. (no radio required).

With a DVAP attached to your computer you can use a D-STAR HT like the ICOM ID31A or the ID-51A around the house, backyard, etc.

These suggestions are not the full list of methods for getting onboard with D-STAR.

But yes, HF is a lot of fun when you are ready to go there. 


73's
Jeff KG5AHC
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K5LXP
Member

Posts: 6097


WWW

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« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2018, 06:25:45 AM »

I've been trying for almost 2 weeks and only have talked to 2 guys-  ... I have tried at all hours of the day and into the late evening ...  there is not a lot of communicating on the 2 meter/70cm band.

RepeaterBook shows over fifty (50!) 2M and 440 repeaters within 15 miles of you.  While some repeaters tend to be more quiet than others, I guarantee with that many repeaters accessible you should be able to stir up a contact with someone, somewhere, 24/7.  Part of it will be how you present yourself on the air - if you sound like a newbie, how confident and personable you are. 

"KM6RWB, monitoring" once in a while isn't going to generate much interest.  "This is KM6RWB, anyone around for a contact?" will get you further.  Calling someone by their call after they've finished a QSO, called "tail ending" is very effective.  Few hams will ignore a direct call.  So figure out what repeaters you can hit and make yourself known.  Be friendly, personable and in a very short time you will have a core group of folks that you know, and will be have frequent contacts with. 

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
 
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KM6RWB
Member

Posts: 51




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« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2018, 04:25:56 PM »

Thanks for all the thoughtful replies- I'll try the eco link and as this is a YAESU I'll have to do wires I guess- It's only been a couple of weeks- I'll keep you posted -
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 7036




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« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2018, 09:40:37 PM »

RWB:  Mark is correct.  You need to state your purpose.....ask if "anyone is around for a chat?"  Think "selling."
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A Pessimist is Never Disappointed!
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 3730




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« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2018, 11:33:03 AM »

I've been trying for almost 2 weeks and only have talked to 2 guys-  ... I have tried at all hours of the day and into the late evening ...  there is not a lot of communicating on the 2 meter/70cm band.

RepeaterBook shows over fifty (50!) 2M and 440 repeaters within 15 miles of you.  While some repeaters tend to be more quiet than others, I guarantee with that many repeaters accessible you should be able to stir up a contact with someone, somewhere, 24/7.  Part of it will be how you present yourself on the air - if you sound like a newbie, how confident and personable you are. 

"KM6RWB, monitoring" once in a while isn't going to generate much interest.  "This is KM6RWB, anyone around for a contact?" will get you further.  Calling someone by their call after they've finished a QSO, called "tail ending" is very effective.  Few hams will ignore a direct call.  So figure out what repeaters you can hit and make yourself known.  Be friendly, personable and in a very short time you will have a core group of folks that you know, and will be have frequent contacts with. 

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
 
  Good advice!  I found that asking for a radio check also helps, since many hams are happy to help out a stranger!  Smiley
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K0UA
Member

Posts: 4369




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« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2018, 08:55:14 PM »

   
Quote
I found that asking for a radio check also helps, since many hams are happy to help out a stranger!


Kerchunk: "Anyone around for a radio check, this is Wxyyy"

First station: "I got mine"
Second station" "I got mine too"
Third station: "yup, I still have mine too"

<squelch tail>

I have seen this actually happen. 


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73  James K0UA
ARRL Missouri Technical Specialist
WZ7U
Member

Posts: 1073




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: April 21, 2018, 09:20:58 PM »

   
Quote
I found that asking for a radio check also helps, since many hams are happy to help out a stranger!


Kerchunk: "Anyone around for a radio check, this is Wxyyy"

First station: "I got mine"
Second station" "I got mine too"
Third station: "yup, I still have mine too"

<squelch tail>

I have seen this actually happen. 




More than once.

My favorite response was "No radio checks accepted. Radio cash only."
It's a rough world out here...
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AA4HA
Member

Posts: 2630




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« Reply #14 on: April 22, 2018, 08:27:25 AM »

It is pretty sad with what has happened to VHF/UHF and how the least knowledgeable of ham radio operators get stuck with one of three choices;

Someone with a tech license does not really understand the differences and limitations between CF4M (Yaesu WIRES), AMBE (Icom D-Dstar) or analog simplex. They are the least prepared to be able to look at the technical merits of one system over another. Often they make a decision within a week or so of earning a license and it limits them to some percentage of all hams on VHF/UHF.

So a newly minted ham, goes to HRO or buys a radio on-line; Maybe they like something about Yaesu, or ICOM or Kenwood, Alinco or maybe even a second-hand radio that another ham gives them a deal on. They install the radio or use the HT and find that there are a limited number of people out there.

Maybe your friends are using D-Star but you bought a Yaesu and can only do analog or WIRES. That can be pretty frustrating.

So quite a few tech licensees go inactive. They will keep the radio around for emergencies; not really understanding that they chose on the wrong side of a technology divide. It is just as bad as the IOS/ Windows situation; most apps are different but both companies claim compatibility by saying that you can save documents or files in a "compatible" format.

It would be ideal if they just decided to make a multi-mode radio that could automatically sense the digital mode and convert on the fly. That goes against the commercial interests of many companies who prefer a "lock" on customers.

It has been hurting the hobby and will continue to do so.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
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