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Author Topic: Learning Morse Code  (Read 3022 times)
G0CTC
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Posts: 2




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« on: April 23, 2018, 08:08:34 AM »

Returning to the hobby after a long  absence. When I passed my morse test about 45 years ago I used a computer with a Morse key attached to practise learning, this was a windows based system.
I now have Apple mack book pro and an iPhone, is it possible to use the mack book pro and attach an iambic key with a program on the computer to practice the morse code. Any help appreciated .
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KG7WGX
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Posts: 71




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« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2018, 08:07:35 PM »

I see that Fldigi is available for Mac computers, and if set up correctly it will decode Morse and show it on the screen in the "receive" window.

The best way to create the Morse from paddles is to get something like

http://www.hamgadgets.com/ULTRA-PICOKEYER

which has a earphone jack.  You can connect the earphone jack to "audio in" on your computer, then configure Fldigi for that sound source. Set levels to prevent overdriving your computer's sound "card".

Windows usually provides a way to "listen to source" when recording, and if your Mac provides this you can have a sidetone when practicing.  Otherwise you would have to devise some kind of Y-cable.

I find CW decoders are useful to help with the timing of the transmitted Morse characters.  If I leave too much time between letters in a word, extra spaces are shown.  Conversely, if I run characters together, I get "unrecognized", wrong letters or sometimes prosigns (like <AS>). 

Quote
...about 45 years ago I used a computer with a Morse key attached to practise learning, this was a windows based system

Bill Gates was setting up in Bellevue and had Basic in his back pocket in 1979 -  Windows was some way off, yet.   Smiley
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G0CTC
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« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2018, 09:40:27 AM »

Thank you very much, very helpful information
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KA5ROW
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« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2018, 02:45:16 PM »

I learned my 5 WPM many years ago got my Tech stopped working with about 4 years. I decided to buy a new HF rig, and thought if I buy a new radio I want to be able to use it for more than CW. I bought high speed CW tapes I lessened to them going and coming back home, the 45 minuet drive each way and none on weekends. It took me about 20 to 25 days and passed my 13 WPM.

Don't start at 7 WPM and work up. Start at 13 - 15 WPM, That was the way I did it, and I believe that is what helped me more than anything.
   
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VK6IS
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Posts: 359




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« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2018, 09:52:06 PM »

on my Tablet, whilst searching for the program from IZ2UUf, & which does work well,
in the search list for Morse Code programs,
- was another called " Faster than Morse Code",, from PaPaCut

this program does seem to work for me, and it has several options,
like Race Against Time and Complex Training.

so,in the Options Area,  I've used the Farnsworth method,
and set the Character Speed to 24wpm & the Code Speed to 16wpm.
since the virtual keyboard is much smaller on the Tablet, than on this Laptop,
for these settings work well, and with enough Character Speed to have to react quickly,
but the Code Speed is slow enough to hit the virtual keyboard.
 Grin
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