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Author Topic: Cold 807s  (Read 3850 times)
N0MKC
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2018, 05:01:29 PM »

<snip>

That's because our beers have taste and so don't have to be refrigerated to get the taste out of them! But remember why there is IPA.....

There's a saying popular among vintage British car & motorcycle enthusiasts over here: "Why do the British drink warm beer?  Lucas refrigerators."

(I've paid my Lucas dues by way of a 70's era Triumph Trident...)
« Last Edit: June 01, 2018, 05:11:37 PM by N0MKC » Logged
KB2WIG
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Posts: 625




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« Reply #16 on: June 02, 2018, 08:54:00 AM »



Are the Brit oz's the same as the US oz's Huh? ??

klc
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 3335




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« Reply #17 on: June 02, 2018, 10:46:01 AM »



Are the Brit oz's the same as the US oz's Huh? ??

klc
Liquid ounces are the same.  Pint, Quart and Gallon are different, however.  Imperial vs. "English" systems.
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KA0HCP, ex-KB4QAA Relocated to Ks. April 2019.
G3RZP
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Posts: 1223




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« Reply #18 on: June 03, 2018, 02:19:55 AM »

The UK pint is 20 fluid ounces: the gallon is 8 pints and thus 160 fluid ounces. The quart - a measure rarely used in the UK these days - is 2 pints i.e. 40 fluid ounces. A gill ( pronounced 'jill') is 1/4 of a pint: that's a measure used mainly for spirits such whisky, gin, rum etc., and a standard 'shot' is 1/5 of a gill in England and Wales but 1/4 of a gill in Scotland.
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KB2WIG
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« Reply #19 on: June 03, 2018, 03:45:20 PM »



So I guess its better to go drinking in Scotland.

klc
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WZ7U
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Posts: 1073




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« Reply #20 on: June 03, 2018, 04:13:46 PM »

Seems like a long way to go just to fudge around with the measurements...
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G3RZP
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Posts: 1223




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« Reply #21 on: June 04, 2018, 01:03:37 AM »

But Scotland has a much lower blood alcohol limit for driving than England or Wales.  I'm told you hit it with 1 pint of 3% beer.

Quote
Seems like a long way to go just to fudge around with the measurements...

Prior to the French revolution and the imposition of the metric system (based, incidentally, on an inaccurate measurement of the earth's diameter), there were a lot of measurements that were generally approximately the same throughout Europe, although the names varied. They all had the same basis - practicality. A furlong (1/8 of a mile) is about the maximum length of furrow the average horse could plough before needing a rest. The acre was the amount of land one man with one horse could plough in a day. A 'stone' (14 pounds)was just that - a rock weighing 14 pounds. Even the depth of the sea was measured in units of around 6 feet (one fathom) in various countries.

For a basically agrarian economy, it worked pretty well. Once manufacturing industry developed beyond making a machine in situ to effectively factory manufacture, more standardisation was needed. At Crofton Beam Engines, on the Kennet and Avon Canal, the Boulton and Watt engine built in 1812 needs a large number of wrenches because the nuts are not all of the same size, and even the threads vary between items of almost the same size. No adjustable wrenches - they came much later, invented by a Swede.
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K4KYV
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« Reply #22 on: July 22, 2018, 10:53:15 AM »

Some geeky ham expression used by ship board radio operators during WWII who were bottled up for hours seeking some escape with a cold brew. They were probably Yanks cause Brits don't like cold beer...perhaps because refrigeration was a standard in the US while in Britain it was a luxury.

US beer is traditionally served ice cold to hide its bland tastelessness. Beer has been around a lot longer than refrigeration.

With the recent explosion in popularity of microbreweries, US beer is now world class if you avoid slop like Budweiser, Bud Lite and their ilk.
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N9AOP
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Posts: 1150




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« Reply #23 on: July 22, 2018, 10:58:33 AM »

Microbreweries are getting like fast food joints--here today, gone tomorrow and replaced by a different one.
Art
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WW7KE
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Posts: 932




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« Reply #24 on: July 22, 2018, 11:16:25 AM »

Microbreweries are getting like fast food joints--here today, gone tomorrow and replaced by a different one.
Art

Or, like Goose Island in Chicago and Four Peaks in Phoenix, they get bought out by Anheuser-Bush-InBev.  Some of those "craft beers" are no longer owned and/or produced by microbreweries.  AB-Inbev, to their credit, has kept the breweries it bought open, and hasn't turned those great beers into Bud Light, at least so far.
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He speaks fluent PSK31, in FT8...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
G3RZP
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Posts: 1223




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« Reply #25 on: July 23, 2018, 12:00:05 PM »

A Californian friend always refers to it as 'Buttwiper'............
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K5LXP
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Posts: 6092


WWW

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« Reply #26 on: July 24, 2018, 03:39:08 AM »


There are a many a fine brewpub/microbrews out there now and it's encouraging to see that industry burgeon as it has in the last couple decades.  But I also see a shift in taste, in the form of "strange brew" that has many and varied adjuncts.  While technically I guess it's beer, the only familiar ingredient is water.  And now IPA isn't just a type, it's a contest to see just how much synthesized hop extract you can add before you start corroding the bottle cap.  Fans of dunkel beer like me who favor more malt based variants like nut browns, porters and scottish ales are often out of luck.  There's a few microbrews around here with 20+ listings on the freshly-made menu, 3/4's of them are horrid IPA's and the rest are the fru-fru fruit or coffee beers.  No doubt they are making what is popular, but it sure ain't popular with me.  The nearby national retail emporium advertises 1100 beers or some fantastic claim, last time I went in there they only had 3 kinds of scottish ales but hundreds of types of IPA's and rice beer swill.  Guess I'll have to start homebrewing again...

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
 
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